Wednesday, July 28th 2021

Intel Alder Lake-S to See Limited Launch of Enthusiast SKUs in 2021, Other Models Arrive 2022

Intel's 12th Generation Core "Alder Lake-S" desktop processor will see a limited launch in 2021, according to an Igor's Lab report. This will be restricted to PC enthusiast-relevant SKUs bearing the -K and -KF brand extensions, and compatible Socket LGA1700 motherboards based only on the top Z690 (Z590-successor) chipset. The series will ramp up to other (locked) models, along with more affordable chipset models (B560-successor), only by Q1-2022, on the sidelines of the 2022 International CES. Sources tell Igor's Lab that these select few models could be launched between October 25 and November 19.

Intel is expected to make several technological leaps over AMD with "Alder Lake-S." To begin with, it has the first hybrid core technology that combines high-performance "Golden Cove" cores with high-efficiency "Gracemont" cores, in a heterogenous multi-core setup comparable to Arm big.LITTLE. Next up, it is expected to debut the PCI-Express Gen 5 I/O, and DDR5 memory support. While PCIe 5.0 GPUs remain under development, the first devices to take advantage of it are expected to be NVMe SSDs, benefiting from 128 Gbps bandwidth (Gen 5 x4). It is also learned that the next-gen motherboards will retain the current ATX 24-pin + EPS power interface, and Intel won't force adoption of ATX12VO. The new ATX12VO standard increases motherboard costs as it essentially transfers DC-to-DC switching components from the PSU to the motherboard (12 V to 5 V; 12 V to 3.3 V, etc), and adds output connectors.
Source: Igor's Lab
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37 Comments on Intel Alder Lake-S to See Limited Launch of Enthusiast SKUs in 2021, Other Models Arrive 2022

#1
Crackong
hmm

So if someone buys a 12th gen
He also needs to

1. Buy a new MB with a new chipset and new socket
2. Buy a new cooler , since no cooler is bundled with "Enthusiast SKUs" , and the Z height has changed with LGA1700.
3. Buy New (Expensive) DDR5 RAM
4. Buy New (Expensive) ATX12VO only PSU
5. Must Install Windows 11 otherwise the BIG. Little core scheduling does not work

Good Luck Intel !

Edit: Misunderstood the ATX12VO thing, it is not forced.
Posted on Reply
#2
TumbleGeorge
Enthusiast platforms for long was LGA 2066 when mainstream was on LGA 1XXX. Entusiast was class between mainstream and server. What stay with Intel?
Posted on Reply
#3
watzupken
Crackonghmm

So if someone buys a 12th gen
He also needs to

1. Buy a new MB with a new chipset and new socket
2. Buy a new cooler , since no cooler is bundled with "Enthusiast SKUs" , and the Z height has changed with LGA1700.
3. Buy New (Expensive) DDR5 RAM
4. Buy New (Expensive) ATX12VO only PSU
5. Must Install Windows 11 otherwise the BIG. Little core scheduling does not work

Good Luck Intel !
Basically other than your casing, SSD and maybe PSU, every other hardware will be new. But the same can be said for AMD's Zen 4 as well I guess.
Posted on Reply
#4
Crackong
watzupkenBasically other than your casing, SSD and maybe PSU, every other hardware will be new. But the same can be said for AMD's Zen 4 as well I guess.
There are too little "leaks" about Zen4 right now, can't say anything for sure.

But so far, we can safely assume we can keep our current PSU for Zen4, and keep our current windows 10 installation.

And if we are lucky, the AMD new socket might retain AM4 cooler compatibility.

That already takes 3 out of the 5 things on my list.

Edit: My bad, it seems ATX12VO is not forced to have on 12th gen MB.
Posted on Reply
#5
Chomiq
Crackonghmm

So if someone buys a 12th gen
He also needs to

1. Buy a new MB with a new chipset and new socket
2. Buy a new cooler , since no cooler is bundled with "Enthusiast SKUs" , and the Z height has changed with LGA1700.
3. Buy New (Expensive) DDR5 RAM
4. Buy New (Expensive) ATX12VO only PSU
5. Must Install Windows 11 otherwise the BIG. Little core scheduling does not work

Good Luck Intel !

Edit: Misunderstood the ATX12VO thing, it is not forced.
Which part of "Enthusiasts" are you missing? If someone is into new hardware they will buy it. Like @watzupken said, AMD will follow similar path sooner or later when they switch to AM5.
Posted on Reply
#6
TheLostSwede
Crackonghmm

So if someone buys a 12th gen
He also needs to

1. Buy a new MB with a new chipset and new socket
2. Buy a new cooler , since no cooler is bundled with "Enthusiast SKUs" , and the Z height has changed with LGA1700.
3. Buy New (Expensive) DDR5 RAM
4. Buy New (Expensive) ATX12VO only PSU
5. Must Install Windows 11 otherwise the BIG. Little core scheduling does not work

Good Luck Intel !

Edit: Misunderstood the ATX12VO thing, it is not forced.
Actually, it's likely we'll see more motherboards with DDR4 support over boards with DDR5 support. Motherboard makers have realised there will be a shortage of DDR5 as well as high costs for it and they want to sell boards, so...
Only the highest end SKUs are likely to get DDR5 support, at least until costs come down.
Posted on Reply
#7
Lnxepique
I don't get the hate that Intel is facing, DDR5 was long expected and the new PSU standard was long overdue (and is in many ways superior). Especially for ITX builds it'll be a welcome change.

The new mobo thing has been endlessly discussed, AM4 wasn't the miracle everyone seems to have it in mind as. Also, who says manufactuers won't come out with mounting brackets if possible?
Posted on Reply
#8
Melvis
LnxepiqueAM4 wasn't the miracle everyone seems to have it in mind as.
Really? Name a better one?
Posted on Reply
#9
ZoneDymo
this is going to be expensive, but F it, been on the same pc for freaking 10 years now? I think?....now we just need to confirm it being decent.
Posted on Reply
#10
TumbleGeorge
MelvisReally? Name a better one?
AMD AM4 boards with 300 series chipset support CPUs from 28nm Bristol Ridge to 7nm Matisse(and some of motherboards with beta BIOS also work with 7nm Vermeer) . Where is chipset/socket manufacturer Intel in comparison of longevity?
Posted on Reply
#11
Metroid
Forget Intel, think about buying AM5, I have already learned my lesson when I bought core i7 in 2009.
Posted on Reply
#12
docnorth
CrackongThere are too little "leaks" about Zen4 right now, can't say anything for sure.

But so far, we can safely assume we can keep our current PSU for Zen4, and keep our current windows 10 installation.

And if we are lucky, the AMD new socket might retain AM4 cooler compatibility.

That already takes 3 out of the 5 things on my list.

Edit: My bad, it seems ATX12VO is not forced to have on 12th gen MB.
Noctua said the necessary adapter for LGA1700 will be provided for free and probably they 'll do the same for the AM5 (LGA I think) socket. The same is expected for most serious manufacturers, in the worst case at a small cost. Also newer coolers or versions are already designed with LGA1700 in mind. I'm not worried about windows 11 either, can't(?) be worse than 10. But you are right, DDR5 pricing and/or availability might be a real problem.
Posted on Reply
#13
ppn
This is the sandy bridge we have been waiting for, so intel can just say nothing and take the money. The same way 3070 is gone even at 2x msrp this has no hope of being reasonably priced, but it would be great to have an Alder Lake/ Ada Lovelace build possible at the end of 2022.
Always the same, first K Sku. this is a 10 year purchase, so double the price means nothing as it just spreads over the years. But it's worth waiting for the intel 20A node for that kind of deal.
Posted on Reply
#14
persondb
Crackonghmm

So if someone buys a 12th gen
He also needs to

1. Buy a new MB with a new chipset and new socket
2. Buy a new cooler , since no cooler is bundled with "Enthusiast SKUs" , and the Z height has changed with LGA1700.
3. Buy New (Expensive) DDR5 RAM
4. Buy New (Expensive) ATX12VO only PSU
5. Must Install Windows 11 otherwise the BIG. Little core scheduling does not work

Good Luck Intel !

Edit: Misunderstood the ATX12VO thing, it is not forced.
Neither ATX12VO nor DDR5 is forced as Alder lake will also support DDR4 and that will probably be more common.
Posted on Reply
#15
watzupken
LnxepiqueI don't get the hate that Intel is facing, DDR5 was long expected and the new PSU standard was long overdue (and is in many ways superior). Especially for ITX builds it'll be a welcome change.

The new mobo thing has been endlessly discussed, AM4 wasn't the miracle everyone seems to have it in mind as. Also, who says manufactuers won't come out with mounting brackets if possible?
I have been thinking to myself, why in the blazers are we in 2021 and still using the dumb 24pin motherboard power connector. Every single power connector have seen some sort of improvement except this. It is good to see someone make a decision to switch out of this ancient power connector for something more streamline and modern. However, the annoying part is that we will need to change PSU. I do hope there is some sort of adapter to use in the interim since I just got my PSU recently and its gonna be a pain to sell it and get another one.
Posted on Reply
#16
ThrashZone
Hi,
Wow already whacked z590 boards too
Guess intel just doesn't understand all this new board stuff is crazy as microsoft carrot on a stick versions nonsense lol
Posted on Reply
#17
efikkan
I'm curious to see what will actually be available.
MetroidForget Intel, think about buying AM5, I have already learned my lesson when I bought core i7 in 2009.
So you are making buying recommendations for 2021/2022 based on a purchase you made back in 2009? :rolleyes:
And how many months do we have to give AMD this time around to get their firmware working? At least when Intel ships their they actually work (or at least within a few days).
watzupkenI have been thinking to myself, why in the blazers are we in 2021 and still using the dumb 24pin motherboard power connector. Every single power connector have seen some sort of improvement except this. It is good to see someone make a decision to switch out of this ancient power connector for something more streamline and modern. However, the annoying part is that we will need to change PSU. I do hope there is some sort of adapter to use in the interim since I just got my PSU recently and its gonna be a pain to sell it and get another one.
Because having long-lasting standards is way more valuable than having the perfect solution for every use case.
Most people today don't grasp the usefulness of standards and wide compatibility. If it were not for the "IBM PC clones" in the 80s, we would have mostly proprietary hardware and software today, and the revolution we saw in the 90s where "every household" could afford a computer would have taken much longer. Good solid standards both helps innovation, brings down cost, and also helps for compatibility/spare parts (which reduces electronic waste).
There are good examples like PCIe, RJ45/Ethernet, etc. and bad ones like SATA power (why did we need this one?) and the ever-changing USB.
Posted on Reply
#19
GeneO
Crackonghmm

So if someone buys a 12th gen
He also needs to

1. Buy a new MB with a new chipset and new socket
2. Buy a new cooler , since no cooler is bundled with "Enthusiast SKUs" , and the Z height has changed with LGA1700.
3. Buy New (Expensive) DDR5 RAM
4. Buy New (Expensive) ATX12VO only PSU
5. Must Install Windows 11 otherwise the BIG. Little core scheduling does not work

Good Luck Intel !

Edit: Misunderstood the ATX12VO thing, it is not forced.
Yeah, it is not forced. Besides, most enthusiast power supplies are single rail 12v with the other voltages derived from the 12v. So I think they would likely need, at most, and adaptor that I expect the PSU manufacturer would supply (seeing as most have 10 year warranties). It's about time PSU moved forwards.
Posted on Reply
#20
Metroid
efikkanSo you are making buying recommendations for 2021/2022 based on a purchase you made back in 2009? :rolleyes:
And how many months do we have to give AMD this time around to get their firmware working? At least when Intel ships their they actually work (or at least within a few days).
Based on what I have seen and experienced what happens when you buy an intel system motherboard+cpu, with every cpu they launch, you need to buy a new motherboard and that is something I'm against. I bought a 3600 with an am4 motherboard and I could upgrade to a 5900x without a problem, with Intel it would not be possible and like I said before I experienced it already back in 2009 and later in 2016.
Posted on Reply
#21
Raven Rampkin
MelvisReally? Name a better one?
Something that doesn't "feature" failing USB, audio, and flaky SATA/PCIe (ok this is rare) across chipsets and chipset families. Something that doesn't try to jump above its head (like they say), cuz (backwards) compatibility is a fickle thing on AM4. Oh... and sure thing it's vendors to blame, not AMD. It's always vendors.
Something that holds the CPU firm. I'm not exactly a butterfingers but I've had a freshly repasted CPU (had to reinsert for troubleshooting) pop out with the cooler... one hour after installation. Despite the twists.

1151. 2015-2019 (not too shabby... from first Sky to last Coffee Re with a mod, and now let's see what AM4's lifespan is going to be), v1 may become v2 with a mod, none of the issues listed above (do tell if I'm clueless), same mounting as other 115s and 1200.
Posted on Reply
#22
efikkan
MetroidBased on what I have seen and experienced what happens when you buy an intel system motherboard+cpu, with every cpu they launch, you need to buy a new motherboard and that is something I'm against. I bought a 3600 with an am4 motherboard and I could upgrade to a 5900x without a problem, with Intel it would not be possible and like I said before I experienced it already back in 2009 and later in 2016.
Intel has, with a few exceptions, launched a new socket with a new architecture. But the quality of the support has been very good to excellent all throughout.
But if you are to criticize Intel for "just" supporting 2 iterations, you have to take a critical look at what the competition does too. AMD has with AM4 promised more than they could deliver. In practice, most boards and chips are compatible 2-3 iterations/refreshes, but you need at big matrix of chipsets and CPUs to check compatibility, and even check the individual motherboards. AMD has unfortunately done a poor job on their firmware too, with Zen 1 and 2 it took ~3 months until they were fairly stable, and Zen 3 was "usable" after 4-5 months but still had some stability issues that was patched recently. These are two major issues with spoils otherwise good products.
So you got to choose between 2 iterations of good support, or 2-3 iterations of questionable support, with iffy memory support and firmware issues for months after release.
Posted on Reply
#23
Tigger
I'm the only one
efikkanIntel has, with a few exceptions, launched a new socket with a new architecture. But the quality of the support has been very good to excellent all throughout.
But if you are to criticize Intel for "just" supporting 2 iterations, you have to take a critical look at what the competition does too. AMD has with AM4 promised more than they could deliver. In practice, most boards and chips are compatible 2-3 iterations/refreshes, but you need at big matrix of chipsets and CPUs to check compatibility, and even check the individual motherboards. AMD has unfortunately done a poor job on their firmware too, with Zen 1 and 2 it took ~3 months until they were fairly stable, and Zen 3 was "usable" after 4-5 months but still had some stability issues that was patched recently. These are two major issues with spoils otherwise good products.
So you got to choose between 2 iterations of good support, or 2-3 iterations of questionable support, with iffy memory support and firmware issues for months after release.
Whereas Intel always works fine from release.
Posted on Reply
#24
TheinsanegamerN
Gruffalo.SoldierWhereas Intel always works fine from release.
For the most part yeah. There were some stabiity issues with rocket lake's launch, which intel was rightly criticized for, the whoe generation has been written off as a waste of time and a mistake.

IME ryzen 1000 was an unstable disaster, 2000 was better, but it wasnt until 3000 that AMD was on intel's level.
efikkanIntel has, with a few exceptions, launched a new socket with a new architecture. But the quality of the support has been very good to excellent all throughout.
But if you are to criticize Intel for "just" supporting 2 iterations, you have to take a critical look at what the competition does too. AMD has with AM4 promised more than they could deliver. In practice, most boards and chips are compatible 2-3 iterations/refreshes, but you need at big matrix of chipsets and CPUs to check compatibility, and even check the individual motherboards. AMD has unfortunately done a poor job on their firmware too, with Zen 1 and 2 it took ~3 months until they were fairly stable, and Zen 3 was "usable" after 4-5 months but still had some stability issues that was patched recently. These are two major issues with spoils otherwise good products.
So you got to choose between 2 iterations of good support, or 2-3 iterations of questionable support, with iffy memory support and firmware issues for months after release.
And let us not forget, for all the "muh AMD 4 years of support" coming from the community, that the 300 series chipsets technically only fully supports 2 geneerations, that AMD had to be forced to support ryzen 3000 on the 300 chipsets, and the outrage that forced them to backtrack on the 5000 series ONLY being suported on the 500 series chipsets. Remember how the 400 series didnt support the ryzen 5000s? I 'member.

It's not 4 years of support, its 2 years, maybe 3 if the community gets outraged enough. But somehow this is better then intel's cleear cut 2 chips per generation.
Posted on Reply
#25
Sabishii Hito
TheinsanegamerNFor the most part yeah. There were some stabiity issues with rocket lake's launch, which intel was rightly criticized for, the whoe generation has been written off as a waste of time and a mistake.

IME ryzen 1000 was an unstable disaster, 2000 was better, but it wasnt until 3000 that AMD was on intel's level.


And let us not forget, for all the "muh AMD 4 years of support" coming from the community, that the 300 series chipsets technically only fully supports 2 geneerations, that AMD had to be forced to support ryzen 3000 on the 300 chipsets, and the outrage that forced them to backtrack on the 5000 series ONLY being suported on the 500 series chipsets. Remember how the 400 series didnt support the ryzen 5000s? I 'member.

It's not 4 years of support, its 2 years, maybe 3 if the community gets outraged enough. But somehow this is better then intel's cleear cut 2 chips per generation.
The kiddies still think it's cool to hate on Intel.
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