Friday, August 6th 2021

AMD Ryzen 7 5700G and Ryzen 5 5600G Already Outselling 5800X and 5600X on Mindfactory

German online retailer Mindfactory may not be as big as Amazon, but it puts out its sales figures of PC hardware components, that often get picked up by the tech-press as a sample size. While using its data as a yardstick for AMD outselling Intel in the DIY market is debatable, sales of individual AMD or Intel products provide valuable insights to what consumers are after these days. Apparently, the recently launched Ryzen 7 5700G and Ryzen 5 5600G APUs are already outselling the Ryzen 7 5800X and Ryzen 5 5600X, respectively, for the week of 2nd August running.

AMD designed the Ryzen 7 5700G to succeed the popular Ryzen 7 3700X, and the 5600G to succeed the best-selling Ryzen 5 3600, which explains the absence of "Ryzen 7 5700X" or "Ryzen 5 5600," at least in the DIY market. It's little surprise then, that just as the 3700X outsold the 3800X, Mindfactory bagged orders for 820 units of 5700G, as opposed to 610 units of the 5800X; and 900 units of the 5600G, compared to 680 units of the 5600X. It's interesting to note that the 5700G even outsold the 5600X. The 5700G and 5600G are based on the 7 nm "Cezanne" silicon, which packs up to 8 "Zen 3" cores, and an iGPU with up to 512 stream processors. Unlike "Vermeer," Cezanne is a monolithic die.
Source: Tech Epiphany (Twitter)
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45 Comments on AMD Ryzen 7 5700G and Ryzen 5 5600G Already Outselling 5800X and 5600X on Mindfactory

#1
eidairaman1
The Exiled Airman
Yeah it's because there are only so many people that can only afford just a processor not a processor and a graphics card

Also oems
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#2
freeagent
It looks like they are a ton of fun to oc.
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#3
Cheese_On_tsaot
5600G is such an awesome option, if I could go back I would choose the G over my X just to have the option of onboard graphics.. if your GPU dies you at least still have something.
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#4
Turmania
A good integrated gpu goes a long way.
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#5
Blaylock
I wonder if this factors in the fact that if you wanted a 5800x, you already have it, so naturally sales will decline after a product has been out for a while. News flash, the newest products sell better than older products. It's literally the reason so many models exist and are launched at different times.
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#6
persondb
I still think that the 5700G has terrible value.
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#7
kruk
persondbI still think that the 5700G has terrible value.
At the current GPU prices, you basically get a $100+ worth GPU with the purchase. With that in mind, the pricing is great compared to the non-APUs.
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#8
mechtech
Not surprising. Less power. Has igp. Less money. Basically same performance with a few exceptions where the extra cache from the 5800x helps like BL3, etc.

If I built a zen 3 system it would be a 5700G

I will probably wait for zen 4. See if it’s ddr5 and how bugs and prices are on the new platform first. At that point maybe get a 5700G and ddr4 for a nice discount.
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#9
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
persondbI still think that the 5700G has terrible value.
AMD says 5700G succeeds 3700X.

3700X launched at $330. 5700G launched at $360 ($30 more), and you get an iGPU, and incrementally more CPU performance than a 3700X. I'd say that's a fair deal. The only area where you're losing out is PCIe, you won't be able to take full advantage of the high-end Gen4 SSDs.
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#10
ODOGG26
btarunrAMD says 5700G succeeds 3700X.

3700X launched at $330. 5700G launched at $360 ($30 more), and you get an iGPU, and incrementally more CPU performance than a 3700X. I'd say that's a fair deal. The only area where you're losing out is PCIe, you won't be able to take full advantage of the high-end Gen4 SSDs.
Great point. Could never get what people be talking about sometimes. $30 for a better product and people complain. Nevermind the cost to make the product has increased as well. Which takes me back to people freaking out over $50 increase for the 5600x. Quite hilarious if you ask me.
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#11
lynx29
hmm, integrated graphics or stick with my gtx 1070... gtx 1070 it is.

still this is good for indie gamers.
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#12
Chrispy_
I'm surprised they're so popular. Halving the cache clearly hurts performance.

I guess some people really are struggling to find a dGPU. Personally I'd dump an old gpu from a decade-old rig in there and stick with the full-fat 5800X/5600X because that half-cache penalty will hurt performance for the entire time you have the CPU, not just the 6 months you need to wait before RTX 3060Ti cards come down to a sensible price.

You don't need the best GPU in the world, you just need a sub-$25 piece of junk that outputs to a display:


Arguably the Vega8 IGP in the 5700G is quite a lot better, but the list of games that run badly on the 5700G's IGP is similar to the list of games that run badly on a shitty old $15 GTX 460. Games either run fine at reasonable graphics settings or they are outside the enjoyable experience threshold on both the vega8 and an old GPU alike.

Unless you spend double-digit hours per week on a specific title that just happens to be on the edge of acceptable performance for a Vega8 IGP, there's really no point to having an IGP outside of troubleshooting.
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#13
Cheese_On_tsaot
Chrispy_I'm surprised they're so popular. Halving the cache clearly hurts performance.

I guess some people really are struggling to find a dGPU. Personally I'd dump an old gpu from a decade-old rig in there and stick with the full-fat 5800X/5600X because that half-cache penalty will hurt performance for the entire time you have the CPU, not just the 6 months you need to wait before RTX 3060Ti cards come down to a sensible price.

You don't need the best GPU in the world, you just need a sub-$25 piece of junk that outputs to a display:


Arguably the Vega8 IGP in the 5700G is quite a lot better, but the list of games that run badly on the 5700G's IGP is similar to the list of games that run badly on a shitty old $15 GTX 460. Games either run fine at reasonable graphics settings or they are outside the enjoyable experience threshold on both the vega8 and an old GPU alike.

Unless you spend double-digit hours per week on a specific title that just happens to be on the edge of acceptable performance for a Vega8 IGP, there's really no point to having an IGP outside of troubleshooting.
A GTX 650 Ti can't even run Ass Creed Valhalla, the iGPU on this can.
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#14
Chrispy_
Cheese_On_tsaotA GTX 650 Ti can't even run Ass Creed Valhalla, the iGPU on this can.
This is my point. The ancient $25 GPU can't run ACV well at all. It's so bad it's painful to look at. But do you really want to play an expensive, AAA sightseeing title like AC Valhalla at 26fps on the lowest settings?

My point is that there really isn't a very big list of titles that a 5700G can run well enough, but an ancient $25 GPU can't run well enough.

Either both IGP and GPU are fine, or both are bad enough that you wouldn't bother.
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#15
Cheese_On_tsaot
Chrispy_This is my point. The ancient $25 GPU can't run ACV well at all. It's so bad it's painful to look at. But do you really want to play an expensive, AAA sightseeing title like AC Valhalla at 26fps on the lowest settings?

My point is that there really isn't a very big list of titles that a 5700G can run well enough, but an ancient $25 GPU can't run well enough.

Either both IGP and GPU are fine, or both are bad enough that you wouldn't bother.
Lowered to 720p with 30+ and sit back with a controller is completely fine, the tests were at 1080P. I think the 5600G is an awesome option due to choice and safety if your dGPU fails.
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#16
mechtech
Chrispy_I'm surprised they're so popular. Halving the cache clearly hurts performance.
It does, but not by much in most things...........I think it would have to come down to what you're going to run with it. Also my 1700 cpu has the same cache as the 5700g so not a loss when comparing to that.

Where I was surprised was the BL3 performance difference?!! And obviously a few science benchmarks.
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#17
Chrispy_
Yeah that's the very slim window where some people will find it acceptable. If you'll tolerate 720p/lowest settings/30-45fps then there are definitely things that a 5700G IGP will handle that you can't do on cheap, ancient GPUs.

TBH, I do wonder how many games live in that overlap though, and also what percentage of people are happy with 720p/lowest/sub-60fps. I know that struggle well, since there were various games I tried to play on a Vega10 2700U laptop - not even a 25W TDP boost and faster RAM could help that play some things....
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#18
Cheese_On_tsaot
Chrispy_Yeah that's the very slim window where some people will find it acceptable. If you'll tolerate 720p/lowest settings/30-45fps then there are definitely things that a 5700G IGP will handle that you can't do on cheap, ancient GPUs.

TBH, I do wonder how many games live in that overlap though, and also what percentage of people are happy with 720p/lowest/sub-60fps. I know that struggle well, since there were various games I tried to play on a Vega10 2700U laptop - not even a 25W TDP boost and faster RAM could help that play some things....
I had an old ACER laptop around 6 years back with a 4570m in it and ran Bioshock Infinite in 480p with the lowest settings and running Radeon Pro to mess with under the hood things and also Windows 7 stripped to it's minimum, I was running it at 27-33 FPS which is insane performance for that GPU as it normally got barely 16 FPS before all the tweaks. That's how I first played that game back when I had money issues and lost all my good gear.
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#19
Chrispy_
mechtechAlso my 1700 cpu has the same cache as the 5700g so not a loss when comparing to that.
I think larger caches are the way forward though; Zen2's IPC uplift was largely attributed to the huge cache increase, and AMD are talking about tripling Zen3's L3 cache with the vertically stacked dies.
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#20
TumbleGeorge
Chrispy_AMD are talking about tripling Zen3's L3 cache with the vertically stacked dies.
For future series*
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#21
mechtech
Chrispy_I think larger caches are the way forward though; Zen2's IPC uplift was largely attributed to the huge cache increase, and AMD are talking about tripling Zen3's L3 cache with the vertically stacked dies.
Ya cache is cash :)

I wonder if we'll see a point when/where DDR will run in sync with L3 cache if the size of the L3 will be as critical then??
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#22
R0H1T
Just wondering if this (5700/5600 G) works with the curve optimizer :confused:
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#23
tabascosauz
R0H1TJust wondering if this (5700/5600 G) works with the curve optimizer :confused:
It's present in Gigabyte's 1.2.0.3b BIOS with 5600G. Same place you'd usually look, AMD OC.

Still working on the CPU OC for my 5600G though, so not sure if it actually works yet.

Interestingly enough, there's a GFX Curve Optimizer. I run a pretty high daily OC of 2275/2300MHz on my 4650G/5600G and don't have any headroom left at 1.2V, so this will be fun to tinker if it works.



edit: not looking so great. Only works when iGPU not manually OC'd, but still basically does the same thing (ie. forces VDDCR_GFX = VSOC). Worst part is that it follows the same rules as PBO so max boost override is +200MHz. Not helpful when I'm already running 2275/2300Mhz.
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#24
Mussels
Freshwater Moderator
persondbI still think that the 5700G has terrible value.
The pricing for it here in Au is great vs the regular chips
For far less money, you basically a 5800 non-x with an IGP




The 5600G is a screamer for a great option for new gaming rigs
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#25
Selaya
Disagree. The only time you should consider Cezanne is when you're taking advantage of its IGP.
Otherwise, it's either Vermeer (no IGP but actual CPU performance in gaming due to 32MiB of cache) or Skylake (for the IGP fans if you need a debug, or just budget because Vermeer is still very expensive - in that latter case at your option, F without the IGP), both will see less of a CPU bottleneck, and in the latter case, for less $ too.
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