Wednesday, October 6th 2021

Intel's Pat Gelsinger Exclaims "Intel is Back" AMD is "Over"

Intel's recently appointed CEO wasn't mincing words in a recent interview with CRN, where he claimed that Intel not only "have the best product" but also that "this period of time when people could say, "Hey, [AMD] is leading," that's over." We'd say them are fighting words, regardless of what various leaks have suggested, since Intel still has a lot to prove with its upcoming Alder Lake CPUs.

Gelsinger continues with "We have 80 percent market share. We have the best software assets that are available in the industry. We do the best job supporting our partners and our OEMs with it. We have an incredible brand that our channel partners, customers want and trust. Wow, that's a lot of assets in that. If the channel partner doesn't see value in that, I want to talk to him." It's pretty clear from this that Intel believes that they're doing a bang up job and if their customers don't see it, then they need a talking to.
For those that were hoping for an engineer to be at the reins of Intel again, the interview with CRN reads like a marketing spinner is at the head of the company. "We are back with a very defined view of what it requires to be leadership in every dimension: leadership product, leadership [chip] packaging, leadership process, leadership software, unquestioned leadership on critical new workloads like AI, graphics, media, power-performance, enabling again the ecosystem. This is what we will be doing with aggressive actions and programs over the next couple of years." How Intel is planning to take the lead in the graphics market is going to be interesting to see if nothing else.

Most of the interview is about how Intel is planning on growing its channel and partner ecosystem, but the article also touches on things like Apple, although once again, Gelsinger dismisses Apple's move away from Intel hardware by saying " We ultimately see the real competition to enable the ecosystem to compete with Apple". This suggests that he doesn't seem to understand why Apple decided to make its own processors in the first place. He also doesn't seem to be a fan of what he calls "Apples closed garden" while calling Windows an "open ecosystem".

When asked how Intel is going to be able to compete with AMD and the various Arm based server parts from companies like Amazon and Ampere, he simply answers "do better products". It's hard to take that kind of an answer seriously and although Intel is hardly in a situation where they're likely to end up on the brink of ruin any time soon, the company has been losing ground in both the server, desktop and notebook markets over the past couple of years.

Gelsinger isn't expecting any further slips in terms of market share, mostly due to the fact that neither Intel or AMD can increase their production at the moment and the situation is likely the same for the Arm based server chip makers. Furthermore, he's expecting pricing to remain stable, although this seems to be referring to server parts, as consumer CPUs aren't discussed in the article. He doesn't see a thread from Arm based server CPUs either, claiming that they have a "very minimal" market share today and will continue to do so.

One interesting quote about the consumer PC side is that he believes that with Alder Lake, Intel will have the "energy efficiency leadership", something no-one else is expecting. That said, it seems like he does have some respect for AMD, saying "AMD has done a solid job over the last couple of years. We won't dismiss them of the good work that they've done". It'll be interesting to see how this unfolds over the next couple of generations of CPUs from both companies, as Intel still has a lot to prove with its new CPU designs.
Source: CRN
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161 Comments on Intel's Pat Gelsinger Exclaims "Intel is Back" AMD is "Over"

#101
GURU7OF9
ThrashZoneHi,
Sounds more like reaction releases after having their ass handed to them
And it took two sockets and two chips to finally beat amd hardly a success story Intel lol
They havent beaten AMD just yet. We have not seen proper testing, all we have had so far is Intel SPIN and some dogy benchmark leaks !
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#102
Chrispy_
When Intel says "we are back" then the first thing I think of is that the old Intel played dirty, bribed/corrupted some OEMs, made illegal impositions on others, was found guilty, and fined.

Intel are back to cheating and playing dirty? I can totally believe it.
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#103
AusWolf
What's the point of all this dick size comparison? Just release Alder Lake, and we'll see for ourselves what's what.
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#104
DonKnotts
HenrySomeoneA whole lot of good that does them with the measly profits there and besides, they can't even deliver enough volume anyway. I wouldn't be surprised if next console contract actually goes to Intel, now that they'll have their gpus as well and not to mention their larger (and more reliable) production capacities.
You're ignoring that TSMC has several new fabs in the process of being built around the globe as well. I doubt Intel will be getting anyone's game console business anytime soon. It's far more likely that if either Sony or MS ever do leave AMD, they will be going to Nvidia if their ARM acquisition goes forward.
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#105
cst1992
AusWolfJust release Alder Lake
That's what, a magic wand? What's that going to fix that what, 6 older generations haven't been able to?
DonKnottsif their ARM acquisition goes forward
Doubt it, if some international governing body is interfering. It'll be either severely delayed or outright cancelled.
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#106
HenrySomeone
DonKnottsYou're ignoring that TSMC has several new fabs in the process of being built around the globe as well. I doubt Intel will be getting anyone's game console business anytime soon. It's far more likely that if either Sony or MS ever do leave AMD, they will be going to Nvidia if their ARM acquisition goes forward.
And AMD won't have priority at ANY of those new fabs, just like they don't have it now. Regarding consoles going to ARM though, it's possible eventually, but not for at least another cycle.
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#107
TheoneandonlyMrK
Wow, this turned a bit steamy.

He's probably not your Dad, remember that.

I mean, he has said it now, like most poor Volta moments, I can't help but wonder , who the f#£@ got this past the PR team, push your wares yes, but minimize the likelihood of you looking stupid.

Like EA with Powered by football, for FIFA

I mean wtaf , cheese, powered by cheese, it is beyond ridiculous.

As is Pat's statement.
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#108
HenrySomeone
It's only ridiculous if it turns out to be false and none and I mean, NONE of the info out so far shows any indication of that. With Alder Lake Intel is certain to take a massive lead in single thread and even in multi, only (the more expensive) 5950x is likely to pose any threat as well, so...
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#109
londiste
cst1992That's what, a magic wand? What's that going to fix that what, 6 older generations haven't been able to?
1. Not accounting for Rocket Lake that has its own problems - a new architecture. 5 of the last 6 have been basically Skylake.
2. A manufacturing process that is competitive enough to TSMC-s 7nm.

This is a pretty big step forward.
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#110
TheoneandonlyMrK
HenrySomeoneIt's only ridiculous if it turns out to be false and none and I mean, NONE of the info out so far shows any indication of that. With Alder Lake Intel is certain to take a massive lead in single thread and even in multi, only (the more expensive) 5950x is likely to pose any threat as well, so...
Regardless of what alder lake achieves, AMD won't be "Over".

That's Ridiculous.

As for arguing with you, no thanks I have been there before , it's dull and completely predictable.
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#111
Chrispy_
cst1992Doubt it, if some international governing body is interfering. It'll be either severely delayed or outright cancelled.
Never underestimate Boris Johnson.
No matter how incompetent you believe the UK government to be, they will disappoint you.
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#112
medi01
mechtechMaybe give out a few more x86 licenses and see how long that lasts.
I think you are underestimating how complicated it is to develop x86 CPUs, let alone compete with established duopoly.
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#113
HenrySomeone
londiste1. Not accounting for Rocket Lake that has its own problems - a new architecture. 5 of the last 6 have been basically Skylake.
2. A manufacturing process that is competitive enough to TSMC-s 7nm.

This is a pretty big step forward.
Yup, Alder Lake is bringing to the table the first real jump in single thread performance in over 6 years (it says a lot about AMD or at least how desperately far behind they were, that they have only been able to match it by now, despite Intel not really advancing since Skylake) and yet certain people (let's call them fans of a certain brand at the least) are crapping all over it with made up or pretend arguments. I think they are in for a world of hurt shortly though... :cool:
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#114
Darmok N Jalad
Based on Intel’s own guidance for 12v2 power delivery, Adler Lake is going to use even more peak current than Canon and Rocket Lakes. It’s going to come at great cost and complexity to beat an existing design that comes no where close to using that kind of juice. And for what? A record CPU-Z score? A 10600K or 5600X will get you all the frames you need to drive a game (if you can afford a GPU), and there are many suitable choices in existence today where multi-thread is your big need. I’m talking designs that don’t peak at over 450W. I don’t see how Intel wouldn’t up the spec on 12v2 unless it was needed to deliver these record scores. If the performance is indeed there, it came at great cost. What really sucks is that this will probably be the future since we’re getting this for 3 straight generations.
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#115
AusWolf
cst1992That's what, a magic wand? What's that going to fix that what, 6 older generations haven't been able to?
It's foolish to form an opinion on a product that hasn't been released.
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#116
Valantar
HenrySomeoneYup, Alder Lake is bringing to the table the first real jump in single thread performance in over 6 years (it says a lot about AMD or at least how desperately far behind they were, that they have only been able to match it by now, despite Intel not really advancing since Skylake) and yet certain people (let's call them fans of a certain brand at the least) are crapping all over it with made up or pretend arguments. I think they are in for a world of hurt shortly though... :cool:
Saying that we can't trust leaks is hardly a "made up argument" - it's the only common sense approach. It's entirely possible that the leaks are accurate, but that again doesn't tell us if they are representative of all usage scenarios, etc. I'm pretty sure Alder Lake will be good (Intel's recent architectures have been, in Ice and Tiger lake), but how good? We have no idea until reviews arrive.
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#117
GURU7OF9
With all this hype and spin the one thing that sticks out in my mind is the new power efficiency of the big little cores . They are supposed to be a much more power efficient setup and yet from what I have read they will still use PL1 125w and PL2 228W. Not much appears to have changed in this space ?
I would have thought it would have come down somewhat ? Mind you its all speculation at this point .
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#118
HenrySomeone
I believe the higher PL2 will be to extract the highest possible multi core performance, but in most other situations, Alder Lake will have a very respectable efficiency (quite possibly better in some than Zen 3, just like Coffee Lake was besting Zen 2 in many scenarios on power usage, despite the higher maximums)
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#119
mechtech
medi01I think you are underestimating how complicated it is to develop x86 CPUs, let alone compete with established duopoly.
No. That’s exactly my point. When you are the dominant company in a duopoly it’s not surprising to have an 80% market share.

ideally it would be nice to have 3 or 4 big players with close to equal market share and company size. It would probably on the whole employ more cpu researchers than one company would and probably on a whole help drive cpu advancement a bit more. In theory if they all had fabs it would probably also help reduce supply issues like we have seen with covid and give the customer more choice.

it is also extremely expensive and complicated to enter the automotive market and compete with GM or Toyota or Honda right off the start, but there is a lot more automotive companies. the other part of my point was the cpu market is also hindered by licensing and other such red tape and duopoly barriers, let alone the reason you mentioned. Trying to attract brain power and capital would not be easy for sure.
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#120
medi01
mechtechideally it would be nice to have 3 or 4 big players with close to equal market share and company size.
But we had that situation, hadn't we?

There is value in fab business becoming B2B thing. It would just be nicer if TSMC was not so far ahead of the rest.
mechtechit is also extremely expensive and complicated to enter the automotive market and compete with GM or Toyota or Honda right off the start, but there is a lot more automotive companies.
There are reasons such as "national islands", with, say French people mostly sticking with French brands and it being nearly impossible for others to enter Japanese market.

However, even there we see things getting bigger and bigger.. (as if Hegel/Marx were right about something :))
mechtechcpu market is also hindered by licensing and other such red tape and duopoly barriers, let alone the reason you mentioned.
Very good point about barriers. Sadly we see new barriers being created (GSync, CUDA, most of the Apple's crap, that glorified upscaler by NV) and customers eagerly embracing the crap. Heck, the hate towards Epic Store.

The only organization that I would count on changing anything in that regard is EU.
"No more roaming costs, motherfathers!"
"USB-C for all devices, cry us a river, Apple!!!"

US government might intervene if it gets to far, I'm afraid, a both AMD and Intel are US companies.
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#121
TheinsanegamerN
medi01Heck, the hate towards Epic Store.
Surprise surprise, when the rich kid buys their way into the club and starts swinging their pocketbook around without any respect for the culture of the club they are joining they get flamed HARD.

Also, refusal to use a platform that is missing tons of features, has terrible software integration, and comes from a company that constantly flip flops on whether the PC is the best platform or a hopeless graveyard run by a CEO with an ego that gives randy pitchford a run for his money is not "hate". It's just common sense.

Oh yeah, and introducing platform exclusivity to the PC with it's generous bribes. In case you havent noticed the PC market does not enjoy that type of toxic segregation and consoles can keep that particular brand of monetization.
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#122
Valantar
TheinsanegamerNSurprise surprise, when the rich kid buys their way into the club and starts swinging their pocketbook around without any respect for the culture of the club they are joining they get flamed HARD.

Also, refusal to use a platform that is missing tons of features, has terrible software integration, and comes from a company that constantly flip flops on whether the PC is the best platform or a hopeless graveyard run by a CEO with an ego that gives randy pitchford a run for his money is not "hate". It's just common sense.

Oh yeah, and introducing platform exclusivity to the PC with it's generous bribes. In case you havent noticed the PC market does not enjoy that type of toxic segregation and consoles can keep that particular brand of monetization.
It's truly hilarious how much of what you listed there fits Valve just as well as Epic. Not all of it, but a lot.
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#123
AusWolf
ValantarIt's truly hilarious how much of what you listed there fits Valve just as well as Epic. Not all of it, but a lot.
Which part? Steam has tons of features and comes from a company that has been constantly supporting PC as their main platform ever since the storefront's release in 2003 or 2004 (apart from the Steam Deck, but that will also be kind of a PC-Linux port). I'm only not sure about their software integration, as I don't use it combined with any other software, but I imagine it to be flawless (based on other features that I use). Oh, and there's no platform exclusivity with Steam.
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#124
Valantar
AusWolfWhich part? Steam has tons of features and comes from a company that has been constantly supporting PC as their main platform ever since the storefront's release in 2003 or 2004 (apart from the Steam Deck, but that will also be kind of a PC-Linux port). I'm only not sure about their software integration, as I don't use it combined with any other software, but I imagine it to be flawless (based on other features that I use). Oh, and there's no platform exclusivity with Steam.
Specifically: rich kid swinging their pocketbook around (presenting Epic as if it's meaningfully richer than Valve is just silly - they're both mega-rich corporations); the CEO ego part (yes, Newell is far less visible and loud, but he wholly embraces the way the gaming community deifies him - different personality types, similar levels of ego); the exclusivity argument isn't a direct mirroring, but Steam's de facto monopoly and the inherent threat of losing money if you don't put your game on Steam makes this more than a match for any exclusivity payments Epic has made.

I also haven't seen any indication of Epic being opposed to PC gaming (or flip-flopping) at least since they opened the EGS. Now, two and a half years isn't a lot to go off of, but that argument goes both ways.

I frankly have no idea what software integrates with Steam - in my experience Valve wants their own solutions or none at all. No doubt there is all kinds of stuff I don't know of though. The only integration with EGS that I've come across is GOG Galaxy (which Steam notably lacks official integration with), which works very well.

As for features, we've argued this before at length, but my opinion still stands that features are only valuable if used, and only in the games in which they are used. For example, I like Steam Remote Play, but given that I use it a handful of times a year it's in no way a determining factor for where I buy my games. The impact is minimal. And third party software generally tends to work better for most things (whether that's MMO raid management, in-game voice/chat, or most other stuff), which generally doesn't need platform integration at all. The main function of a game store/launcher is and continues to be the ability to buy, download, update and play games, which EGS does excellently, and it thankfully has the most central add-on feature (which relates directly to core gameplay): cloud saves. Beyond that, store/launcher features are mostly optional, variable from game to game, and complexly interwoven with other third party services. Thus, unless there is a glaring omission (a lack of cloud saves would definitely be this), I don't see the problem with buying games across stores.

I mean, you can argue that EGS lacks features just as you can argue that Steam's UI (and especially the overlay) are hopelessly dated and impractical. Both are true, and neither is a deal-breaker to me. They're just different. And more options = more betterer.
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#125
Vayra86
cst1992What tripe.

Show me CPUs that don't shut down 500W PSUs in an otherwise modest system and I'll believe this guy.

Otherwise, forget it.

What a disappointment.
How can you be disappointed when the product isn't there yet? I mean, so far Intel's only got a few bench results to speak for the last five years of CPU development. In the real world they're still surpassed royally especially on enterprise.

All I see here is hot air, not unlike what came out of that water chilled turbo CPU they used one day. We won't forget :) And Pat's hot air smells like old people.
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