Tuesday, January 11th 2022

ASUS Shows Off TUF Gaming Capture Box FHD120

ASUS seems to want a bigger slice of the game streaming market, as it was showing off its second such product during CES, in the shape of the TUF Gaming Capture Box FHD120. This should be a cheaper variant of its previously launched TUF Gaming Video Capture Box CU4K30, as it lacks 4K and even 1440p capabilities, but this is unlikely to be a problem for most gamers that would be using it to stream their gaming sessions. It does at least support 120 Hz recording, or 120 FPS if you prefer, which still puts it ahead of much of the competition, assuming it'll be competitively priced.

ASUS changed the design quite a bit compared to the CU4K30 and the FHD120 is more squared off, but with protruding bits in the corners. The LEDs have also been moved to the TUF logo on the top of the device, rather than being a light bar at the front of the device. Connectivity appears to be nigh on identical, with both devices sporting a pair of HDMI 2.0 ports, although the FHD120 doesn't appear to support more than 60 FPS passthrough above 1080p. Both devices also have one USB-C 3.2 gen 1x1 port, aka USB 3.0 at 5 Gbps, as well as a combo headset jack and a separate combo jack that can be connected to a gamepad. You obviously still need a PC to do the video compression, as the video is sent uncompressed from the FHD120 to the computer. No word on pricing, but the CU4K30 has an MSRP of US$210, so we're expecting a US$150-175 MSRP range if ASUS intends to be competitive.
Source: ASUS
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3 Comments on ASUS Shows Off TUF Gaming Capture Box FHD120

#1
Wirko
Does it support VRR? Or should I rather ask, is there a standard that supports video recording, storage and playback at a variable refresh period?
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#2
TheLostSwede
WirkoDoes it support VRR? Or should I rather ask, is there a standard that supports video recording, storage and playback at a variable refresh period?
I don't think so, in both cases. This is not a way video is expected to work in a traditional sense and I think it would cause some issues during the encoding process.
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#3
trsttte
WirkoDoes it support VRR? Or should I rather ask, is there a standard that supports video recording, storage and playback at a variable refresh period?
A recording doesn't really have a refresh rate, it only has fps and those can be variable depending on the container and encoder used to store the video. Now that you mention I'm actually curious to know how all this "gaming" oriented capture cards handle that scenario. My only experince is with blackmagic gear and that only presents a black screen if ANY setting (like interporlated/progressive for example) is set incorrectly (the usual annoyances with blackmagic stuff), doubt "gaming" stuff is so abrupt.
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