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AMD "Navi 14" and "Navi 12" GPUs Detailed Some More

The third known implementation of AMD's "Navi" generation of GPUs with RDNA architecture is codenamed "Navi 14." This 7 nm chip is expected to be a cut-down, mainstream chip designed to compete with a spectrum of NVIDIA GeForce GTX 16-series SKUs, according to a 3DCenter.org report. The same report sheds more light on the larger "Navi 12" GPU that could power faster SKUs competing with the likes of the GeForce RTX 2080 and RTX 2080 Super. The two follow the July launch of the architecture debut with "Navi 10." There doesn't appear to be any guiding logic behind the numerical portion of the GPU codename. When launched, the pecking order of the three Navi GPUs will be "Navi 12," followed by "Navi 10," and "Navi 14."

"Navi 14" is expected to be the smallest of the three, with an estimated 170 mm² die-area, about 24 RDNA compute units (1,536 stream processors), and expected to feature a 128-bit wide GDDR6 memory interface. It will be interesting to see how AMD carves out an SKU that can compete with the GTX 1660 Ti, which has 6 GB of 192-bit GDDR6 memory. The company would have to wait for 16 Gbit (2 GB) GDDR6 memory chips, or piggy-back eight 8 Gbit chips to achieve 8 GB, or risk falling short of recommended system requirements of several games at 1080p, if it packs just 4 GB of memory.

AMD Updates Roadmaps to Lock RDNA2 and Zen 3 onto 7nm+, with 2020 Launch Window

AMD updated its technology roadmaps to reflect a 2020 launch window for its upcoming CPU and graphics architectures, "Zen 3" and RDNA2. The two will be based on 7 nm+ , which is AMD-speak for the 7 nanometer EUV silicon fabrication process at TSMC, that promises a significant 20 percent increase in transistor-densities, giving AMD high transistor budgets and more clock-speed headroom. The roadmap slides however hint that unlike the "Zen 2" and RDNA simultaneous launch on 7th July 2019, the next-generation launches may not be simultaneous.

The slide for CPU microarchitecture states that the design phase of "Zen 3" is complete, and that the microarchitecture team has already moved on to develop "Zen 4." This means AMD is now developing products that implement "Zen 3." On the other hand, RDNA2 is still in design phase. The crude x-axis on both slides that denotes year of expected shipping, too appears to suggest that "Zen 3" based products will precede RDNA2 based ones. "Zen 3" will be AMD's first response to Intel's "Comet Lake-S" or even "Ice Lake-S," if the latter comes to fruition before Computex 2020. In the run up to RDNA2, AMD will scale up RDNA a notch larger with the "Navi 12" silicon to compete with graphics cards based on NVIDIA's "TU104" silicon. "Zen 2" will receive product stack additions in the form of a new 16-core Ryzen 9-series chip later this month, and the 3rd generation Ryzen Threadripper family.

AMD Readies Larger 7nm "Navi 12" Silicon to Power Radeon RX 5800 Series?

AMD is developing a larger GPU based on its new "Navi" architecture to power a new high-end graphics card family, likely the Radeon RX 5800 series. The codename "Navi 12" is doing rounds on social media through familiar accounts that have high credibility with pre-launch news and rumors. The "Navi 10" silicon was designed to compete with NVIDIA's "TU106," as its "XT" and "Pro" variants outperform NVIDIA's original RTX 2060 and RTX 2070, forcing it to develop the RTX 20 Super series, by moving up specifications a notch.

Refreshing its $500 price-point was particularly costly for NVIDIA, as it was forced to tap into the 13.6 billion-transistor "TU104" silicon to carve out the RTX 2070 Super; while for the RTX 2060 Super, it had to spend 33 percent more on the memory chips. With the "Navi 12" silicon, AMD is probably looking to take a swing at NVIDIA's "TU104" silicon, which has been maxed out by the RTX 2080 Super, disrupting the company's $500-700 lineup once again, with its XT and Pro variants. There's also a remote possibility of "Navi 12" being an even bigger chip, targeting the "TU102."

NVIDIA Launches the GeForce RTX 2080 Super Graphics Card

NVIDIA today launched the GeForce RTX 2080 Super graphics card, priced at USD $699. The card replaces the RTX 2080 from this price-point, which will be sold at discounted prices of around $630, while stocks last. The RTX 2080 Super is based on the same 12 nm "TU104" silicon as the original, but is bolstered on three fronts: first, it maxes out the "TU104" by enabling all 3,072 CUDA cores. Second, it comes with increased GPU Boost frequency of 1815 MHz, compared to 1710 MHz of the original; and lastly it comes with the highest-clocked 15.5 Gbps GDDR6 memory solution.

The card ships with 8 GB of memory across a 256-bit wide memory bus, which at 15.5 Gbps works out to roughly 496 GB/s of memory bandwidth, a 11 percent increase over the original RTX 2080. Other specifications of the GeForce RTX 2080 Super include 192 TMUs, 64 ROPs, 48 RT cores, and 384 Tensor cores. NVIDIA is allowing its board partners to launch custom-design boards that start at the same $699 baseline.
Our launch-day GeForce RTX 2080 Super coverage includes the following content: NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Super Founders Edition review | MSI GeForce RTX 2080 Super Gaming X Trio review | ZOTAC GeForce RTX 2080 Super AMP Extreme review

NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Super Features 10 Percent Faster Memory

NVIDIA's upcoming GeForce RTX 2080 Super graphics card doesn't just max out the 12 nm "TU104" silicon and add higher GPU clock-speeds, but also features the highest-clocked GDDR6 memory solution on the market, to make the most of the 256-bit wide memory bus of the silicon. NVIDIA deployed 15.5 Gbps GDDR6 memory, which is 10.7 percent faster than the 14 Gbps memory used on the original RTX 2080 and other RTX 20-series graphics cards. The memory real-clock is set at 1937 MHz compared to 1750 MHz on the original RTX 2080. At this memory frequency, the RTX 2080 Super enjoys a memory bandwidth just a touch short of 500 GB/s, at 496 GB/s.

Besides memory, the RTX 2080 Super maxes out the "TU104" silicon by enabling all 3,072 CUDA cores physically present, as opposed to just 2,944 of them being enabled on the original RTX 2080. The card is also endowed with 192 TMUs, 64 ROPs, 384 Tensor cores, and 48 RT cores. The GPU frequencies are set at 1650 MHz with 1815 MHz GPU Boost, compared to 1515/1710 MHz of the original RTX 2080. NVIDIA is launching the RTX 2080 Super at an MSRP of USD $699, with availability slated for July 23. The company's add-in card (AIC) partners are allowed to design custom-design cards that come with improved cooling solutions and higher clocks.

EVGA RTX 2060 Super and RTX 2070 Super Pictured

Ahead of formal launch tomorrow (2nd July), followed by a 9th July market availability, pictures of EVGA's custom-design GeForce RTX 2060 Super and RTX 2070 Super graphics cards were leaked to the web by an early listing on Amazon. The RTX 2060 Super XC Ultra is a triple-slot monstrosity, which uses a thicker heatsink ventilated by a pair of spinners; while the RTX 2070 Super XC is the base variant of an entire stack of cards based on this chip. The boxes have clear "Super" branding in the SKU detail corners. This branding is also found on metal decals on the cooler shrouds, and printed on the back-plates.

The listing also confirms that the RTX 2060 Super features 8 GB of GDDR6 memory. This move was necessitated by AMD equipping its Radeon RX 5700 graphics card with 8 GB of 14 Gbps GDDR6 memory. The RTX 2060 Super makes full use of the 256-bit memory bus width of the "TU106" silicon. The RTX 2070 Super, on the other hand, is based on the larger "TU104" chip, and has 2,560 of the 3,072 CUDA cores present on the chip enabled. This SKU is designed to compete with the RX 5700 XT. We'll find pictures of custom-design RTX 2080 Super as we inch closer to its July 23 market availability date.

NVIDIA RTX 2070 SUPER Pictured for the First Time

VideoCardz have managed to snag a photo of the upcoming NVIDIA RTX 2070 SUPER. Set in a new, Turing refresh series of graphics cards that will basically increase execution units and RT capabilities across the RTX 2000 series lineup, the RTX 2070 SUPER is based on the TU104 silicon, which powers the current RTX 2080 graphics card (revision TU104-410-A1). With 2560 shading units, 160 TMUs and 64 ROPs, 320 Tensor cores and 40 RT cores across 40 SMs, this card is meant to bring the battle to AMD's upcoming Navi graphics cards, keeping NVIDIA's momentum in the consumer market.

The card is basically an NVIDIA reference RTX 2070 with a green SUPER logo, with the additional differentiation of the black part of the cooler shroud now being silver-colored. According to leaked information, it's expected that NDAs will be lifted come the series launch on July 2nd.

NVIDIA's SUPER Tease Rumored to Translate Into an Entire Lineup Shift Upwards for Turing

NVIDIA's SUPER teaser hasn't crystallized into something physical as of now, but we know it's coming - NVIDIA themselves saw to it that our (singularly) collective minds would be buzzing about what that teaser meant, looking to steal some thunder from AMD's E3 showing. Now, that teaser seems to be coalescing into something amongst the industry: an entire lineup upgrade for Turing products, with NVIDIA pulling their chips up one rung of the performance chair across their entire lineup.

Apparently, NVIDIA will be looking to increase performance across the board, by shuffling their chips in a downward manner whilst keeping the current pricing structure. This means that NVIDIA's TU106 chip, which powered their RTX 2070 graphics card, will now be powering the RTX 2060 SUPER (with a reported core count of 2176 CUDA cores). The TU104 chip, which power the current RTX 2080, will in the meantime be powering the SUPER version of the RTX 2070 (a reported 2560 CUDA cores are expected to be onboard), and the TU102 chip which powered their top-of-the-line RTX 2080 Ti will be brought down to the RTX 2080 SUPER (specs place this at 8 GB GDDR6 VRAM and 3072 CUDA cores). This carves the way for an even more powerful SKU in the RTX 2080 Ti SUPER, which should be launched at a later date. Salty waters say the RTX 2080 Ti SUPER will feature and unlocked chip which could be allowed to convert up to 300 W into graphics horsepower, so that's something to keep an eye - and a power meter on - for sure. Less defined talks suggest that NVIDIA will be introducing an RTX 2070 Ti SUPER equivalent with a new chip as well.

NVIDIA To Stop Differentiation of Better Binned A-dies for AIB Factory Overclocked Cards

A report from Tom's Hardware.de claims that multiple industry sources have confirmed that NVIDIA will stop offering higher-binned, differentiated A-dies of their Turing silicon. If you'll remember, the company introduced specific A-binned chips for AIB partners to ship with factory overclocks to customers, due to their higher overclockability - and likely, better power consumption profile - when compared to non A-binned dies. This practice was reserved to the company's best, though, in the form of the TU104-400A-A1 die (compared to the TU104-400-A1 dies used in non-overclocked versions of AIB graphics cards). The company is now seemingly killing this practice by offering a one-off Turing die with no such limitations.

This move by NVIDIA - on which we reported firsthand here at TPU - was likely a solution to somewhat less than ideal yields for its TU-104 chips, ensuring partners could provide the best experience to users who were willing to pay the most. The fact of the matter is that AIB partners were locked out of overclocking non-A dies should they acquire them (which were going for less than their higher-binned A-cousins), though the end-user would not see such a limitation - besides the one imposed by the expectedly less capable dies present on those non factory-OC'd cards.

EK Releases Vector RTX Series Blocks for ASUS ROG Strix Series Graphics Cards

EK Water Blocks, the Slovenia based water cooling gear manufacturer, is introducing its new generation water blocks for the popular ROG Strix GeForce RTX series graphics cards, based on Turing TU106, Turing TU104 and Turing TU102 graphics processor.

The inspiration for the new GPU block name "Vector" came from the sheer computing power of the graphics cards that are on the market today. Naming a water block "Full Cover" isn't enough these days, when the product is packed with unique features, such as these. The EK Vector Strix RTX water blocks are specially designed for multiple ROG Strix GeForce RTX Turing based graphics cards. The water block itself uses the signature EK single slot slim look, and it covers the entire PCB length. This sophisticated cooling solution will transform your powerful ROG graphics card into a minimalistic, elegant piece of hardware with accented RGB LED lighting. The block also features a unique aesthetic cover over the block Terminal which is designed to showcase the graphics card model via LEDs, visible from the side.

NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2070 and 2080 Mobile Could Make an Appearance at CES 2019

With NVIDIA's GeForce RTX 20-series having already released for desktops, it was only a matter of time until laptops got the RTX treatment as well. Current rumors are suggesting that Nvidia will officially launch their GeForce RTX 20-series mobility GPUs on January 6th at CES with the RTX 2070 and RTX 2070 Max-Q taking center stage. An embargo date of January 26th has also been set, with NVIDIA delaying their final release drivers until then. Meaning final performance results for the new mobile GPUs won't be available until after the embargo date, which should coincide with the general availability of RTX 20-series equipped laptops.

Along with the RTX 2070 and 2070 Max-Q mobility parts, the flagship RTX 2080 Max-Q which isn't expected at the show, is still in the works, with its TU104M 1eab device ID having been leaked earlier. The rest of the GeForce 20-series mobility GPUs are likely to use the GTX moniker if NVIDIA's desktop lineup is anything to go by; however, that is merely speculation at this point.

ASUS RTX 2080 Turbo (Baseline) Cards Come with TU104 "A" Chips

The GeForce RTX 2080 Turbo from ASUS is supposed to be a "baseline" RTX 2080 product, which the company can sell at $699, or closest to it. These boards were found to feature the TU104-400A-A1 variant of the TU104 silicon, which NVIDIA allows its add-in card (AIC) partners to ship factory-overclocked speeds with. At this point it's not known if all ASUS RTX 2080 Turbo cards feature the "A" variant TU104 chips, or if it's a lottery. Given that the ASUS RTX 2080 Turbo's PCB is largely based on NVIDIA's reference design, PC Games Hardware (PCGH) has been able to successfully flash the card's BIOS with that of the RTX 2080 Founders Edition cards based on the reference PCB, which have power-limits increased to the tune of 307 W, which facilitates not just higher GPU Boost frequencies, but also better sustainability of elevated boost clock states.

With its "Turing" family of GPUs, NVIDIA created ASIC variants along the lines of chips that board partners are allowed to factory-overclock, and those that they aren't. You can read all about that in our older article. Normally, the TU104-400-A1 silicon is intended for baseline cards such as the ASUS RTX 2080 Turbo, whereas the TU104-400A-A1 goes into factory-overclocked products such as ASUS RTX 2080 ROG Strix. The discovery of TU104-400A-A1 on the ASUS RTX 2080 Turbo makes it the cheapest option for enthusiasts wanting to flash it with BIOS of other reference-PCB based cards that have TU104-400A-A1 chips to increase power limits, and then simply pairing the card with custom liquid cooling, to manually overclock further, thanks to the increased power limits. We're not sure you can flash Founders Edition BIOS on cards that have reference-design PCBs but non-A ASICs.

NVIDIA Readies TU104-based GeForce RTX 2070 Ti

Update: Gigabyte themselves have come out of the gates dismissing this as a typo on their part, which is disappointing, if not unexpected, considering that there is no real reason for NVIDIA to launch a new SKU to a market virtually absent of competition. Increased tiers of graphics card just give more options for the consumer, and why give an option that might drive customers away from more expensive graphics card options?

NVIDIA designed the $500 GeForce RTX 2070 based on its third largest silicon based on "Turing," the TU106. Reviews posted late Tuesday summarize the RTX 2070 to offer roughly the the same performance level as the GTX 1080 from the previous generation, at the same price. Generation-to-generation, the RTX 2070 offers roughly 30% more performance than the GTX 1070, but at 30% higher price, in stark contrast to the GTX 1070 offering 65% more performance than the GTX 970, at just 25% more price. NVIDIA's RTX varnish is still nowhere in sight. That said, NVIDIA is not on solid-ground with the RTX 2070, and there's a vast price gap between the RTX 2070 and the $800 RTX 2080. GIGABYTE all but confirmed the existence of an SKU in between.

NVIDIA GeForce RTX 20-series Mobility mGPU Lineup Revealed

NVIDIA is giving finishing touches to its first GeForce RTX 20-series Mobility GPUs for notebooks, based on the "Turing" architecture, with product launches expected from Q1-2019. The company could debut the series with a high-end part first, the GeForce RTX 2080 Mobility Max-Q. The rest of the lineup includes the RTX 2070 Mobility Max-Q, RTX 2060 Ti Mobility, RTX 2060 Mobility, RTX 2050 Ti Mobility, and RTX 2050 Mobility. What's interesting about this list is that NVIDIA is limiting the Max-Q design to its top-tier RTX 2080 Mobility and RTX 2070 Mobility parts.

Max-Q is an all-encompassing laptop thermal-design methodology, which allows gaming notebook designers to come up with thinner notebooks with higher performance. One of the key aspects is special Max-Q ready variants of the GPUs, which are probably binned to run the coolest, and least voltages. With a device ID 1eab, the RTX 2080 Mobility Max-Q is based on the TU104M chip, while other SKUs could be carved from the TU106M or a chip even smaller. It's being reported that with this generation, NVIDIA is playing a more active role in helping its partners engineer their Max-Q notebooks, and helping them meet NVIDIA's strict Z-height minimums.

NVIDIA Quadro RTX 6000 and RTX 5000 Up for Pre-Order, Full TU102 at $6,300

NVIDIA opened up its "Turing" based Quadro RTX 6000 and RTX 5000 graphics cards up for pre-order on its website. The RTX 6000 is priced at USD $6,300, and a quantity limitation of 5 per customer is in place. The RTX 5000, on the other hand, is priced at $2,300, and is out of stock at the time of this writing. The RTX 6000 maxes out the TU102 silicon with 4,608 CUDA cores, 576 Tensor cores, 72 RT cores, and is armed with 24 GB of GDDR6 memory, across the chip's full 384-bit memory bus width, making it the cheapest graphics card that maxes out the silicon, unless NVIDIA comes up with a "TITAN X Turing." The Quadro series comes with an enterprise feature-set and certifications for major content-creation applications not available on the GeForce series.

The Quadro RTX 5000, on the other hand, maxes out the TU104 silicon with 3,072 CUDA cores, 384 Tensor cores, 48 RT cores, and 16 GB of GDDR6 memory across the chip's 256-bit wide memory interface. The $10,000 RTX 8000, which isn't open to pre-orders yet, arms the TU102 with a whopping 48 GB of memory, and higher clocks than the RTX 6000. NVIDIA debuted the "Turing" graphics architecture with the Quadro RTX series a week before the new GeForce RTX 20-series.

NVIDIA Segregates Turing GPUs; Factory Overclocking Forbidden on the Cheaper Variant

While working on GPU-Z support for NVIDIA's RTX 20-series graphics cards, we noticed something curious. Each GPU model has not one, but two device IDs assigned to it. A device ID is a unique identification that tells Windows which specific device is installed, so it can select and load the relevant driver software. It also tells the driver, which commands to send to the chip, as they vary between generations. Last but not least, the device ID can be used to enable or lock certain features, for example in the professional space. Two device IDs per GPU is very unusual. For example, all GTX 1080 Ti cards, whether reference or custom design, are marked as 1B06. Titan Xp on the other hand, which uses the same physical GPU, is marked as 1B02. NVIDIA has always used just one ID per SKU, no matter if custom-design, reference or Founders Edition.

We reached out to industry sources and confirmed that for Turing, NVIDIA is creating two device IDs per GPU to correspond to two different ASIC codes per GPU model (for example, TU102-300 and TU102-300-A for the RTX 2080 Ti). The Turing -300 variant is designated to be used on cards targeting the MSRP price point, while the 300-A variant is for use on custom-design, overclocked cards. Both are the same physical chip, just separated by binning, and pricing, which means NVIDIA pretests all GPUs and sorts them by properties such as overclocking potential, power efficiency, etc.

EK Releasing EK-Vector RTX 2000 Series Water Blocks

EK Water Blocks, the Slovenia based water cooling gear manufacturer, is introducing its new generation of high-performance water blocks for the newly announced NVIDIA GeForce RTX series graphics cards, based on Turing TU104 and Turing TU102 graphics processor. The inspiration for the new GPU block name "Vector" came from the sheer computing power of the graphics cards that are on the market today. Naming a water block "Full Cover" isn't enough these days, when the product is packed with unique features, such as these.

The EK Vector RTX water block is specially designed for multiple NVIDIA GeForce RTX Turing based reference design graphics cards. The water block itself uses the signature EK single slot slim look, and it covers the entire PCB length. This sophisticated cooling solution will transform your beefy graphics card into a minimalist, elegant piece of a hardware. The block also features a unique aesthetic cover over the block Terminal which is designed to reveal the graphics card model, visible from the side.

GALAX Confirms Specs of RTX 2080 and RTX 2080 Ti

GALAX spilled the beans on the specifications of two of NVIDIA's upcoming high-end graphics cards, as it's becoming increasingly clear that the company could launch the GeForce RTX 2080 and the GeForce RTX 2080 Ti simultaneously, to convince GeForce "Pascal" users to upgrade. The company's strategy appears to be to establish 40-100% performance gains over the previous generation, along with a handful killer features (such as RTX, VirtuaLink, etc.,) to trigger the upgrade-itch.

Leaked slides from GALAX confirm that the RTX 2080 will be based on the TU104-400 ASIC, while the RTX 2080 Ti is based on the TU102-300. The RTX 2080 will be endowed with 2,944 CUDA cores, and a 256-bit wide GDDR6 memory interface, holding 8 GB of memory; while the RTX 2080 Ti packs 4,352 CUDA cores, and a 352-bit GDDR6 memory bus, with 11 GB of memory. The memory clock on both is constant, at 14 Gbps. The RTX 2080 has its TDP rated at 215W, and draws power from a combination of 6-pin and 8-pin PCIe power connectors; while the RTX 2080 Ti pulls 250W TDP, drawing power through a pair of 8-pin PCIe power connectors. You also get to spy GALAX' triple-fan non-reference cooling solution in the slides below.

NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 ASIC is "TU104," Smiles for the Camera

Here are some of the first pictures of the "TU104," the chip at at heart of NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080, in its top-spec TU104-400A-A1 variant. While the package itself isn't bigger than that of its predecessors, the GP104 and GM204, the die of the TU104 is huge! If it's built on existing silicon fabrication processes such as 14 nm or 12 nm, the TU104 could end up with transistor-counts higher than those of even the GP102.

You'll recall that we posted bare-PCB pictures of this board recently. In its production (or close-to-production) variant, the board draws power from a combination of 6-pin and 8-pin PCIe connectors, conditioning it with an 8+2 phase VRM. The GPU is surrounded by eight GDDR6 memory chips. Display connectivity includes three DisplayPorts, an HDMI, and a USB type-C (VirtuaLink).

NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2000 Series Specifications Pieced Together

Later today (20th August), NVIDIA will formally unveil its GeForce RTX 2000 series consumer graphics cards. This marks a major change in the brand name, triggered with the introduction of the new RT Cores, specialized components that accelerate real-time ray-tracing, a task too taxing on conventional CUDA cores. Ray-tracing and DNN acceleration requires SIMD components to crunch 4x4x4 matrix multiplication, which is what RT cores (and tensor cores) specialize at. The chips still have CUDA cores for everything else. This generation also debuts the new GDDR6 memory standard, although unlike GeForce "Pascal," the new GeForce "Turing" won't see a doubling in memory sizes.

NVIDIA is expected to debut the generation with the new GeForce RTX 2080 later today, with market availability by end of Month. Going by older rumors, the company could launch the lower RTX 2070 and higher RTX 2080+ by late-September, and the mid-range RTX 2060 series in October. Apparently the high-end RTX 2080 Ti could come out sooner than expected, given that VideoCardz already has some of its specifications in hand. Not a lot is known about how "Turing" compares with "Volta" in performance, but given that the TITAN V comes with tensor cores that can [in theory] be re-purposed as RT cores; it could continue on as NVIDIA's halo SKU for the client-segment.

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1180 Bare PCB Pictured

Here are some of the first pictures of the bare printed circuit board (PCB) of NVIDIA's upcoming GeForce GTX 1180 graphics card (dubbed PG180), referred to by the person who originally posted them as "GTX 2080" (it seems the jury is still out on the nomenclature). The PCB looks hot from the press, with its SMT points and vias still exposed. The GT104 GPU traces hint at a package that's about the size of a GP104 or its precessors. It's wired to eight memory chips on three sides, confirming a 256-bit wide memory bus. Display outputs appear flexible, for either 2x DisplayPort + 2x HDMI, or 3x DisplayPort + 1x HDMI configurations.

The VRM setup is surprisingly powerful for a card that's supposed to succeed the ~180W GeForce GTX 1080, which can make do with a single 8-pin PCIe power input. The card draws power from a combination of 6-pin and 8-pin PCIe power connectors. There is a purportedly 10-phase VCore side, which in all likelihood is a 5-phase setup with "dumb" phase-doubling; and similarly, a 2-phase memory power (which could again be doubled single-phase). The SLI-HB fingers also make way. There's a new connector that looks like a single SLI finger and an NVLink finger arranged side-by-side. NVIDIA still hasn't given up on multi-GPU. NVLink is a very broad interconnect, in terms of bandwidth. NVIDIA probably needs that for multi-GPU setups to work with not just high resolutions (4K, 5K, or even 8K), but also higher bit-depth, higher refresh-rates, HDR, and other exotic data. The reverse side doesn't have much action other than traces for the VRM controllers, phase doublers, and an unusually large bank of SMT capacitors (the kind seen on AMD PCBs with MCM GPUs).

NVIDIA "GT104" Based GeForce GTX 1180 Surfaces on Vietnamese Stores

A Vietnamese online store put up the first listing of a GeForce GTX 1180 based ASUS ROG Strix graphics card. The store even put out some specifications of the card, beginning with it being based on the "GT104" silicon, based on the "Turing" series. With "Turing" NVIDIA appears to be forking its GPU architectures on the basis of chips that feature DPFP (double-precision floating point) cores and Tensor cores, and those that lack both (and only feature SPFP cores). "Turing" is probably a fork of "Volta" that lacks both DPFP CUDA cores and Tensor cores; and sticks to the cheaper GDDR6 memory architecture, while "Volta" based GPUs, such as the TITAN V, implement pricier HBM2 memory.

Among the specifications of the GeForce GTX 1180 are 3,584 CUDA cores, and 16 GB of GDDR6 memory across a 256-bit wide memory interface. The memory is clocked at 14 GHz (GDDR6-effective), which works out to 409.6 GB/s of memory bandwidth. Pre-launch prices, just like most specifications, tend to be bovine excrement, which in this case converts to a little over USD $1,500, and isn't really relevant. What is, however, interesting is the availability date of September 28.
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