Wednesday, January 19th 2011

AMD Delivers the World's First and Only APU for Embedded Systems

AMD today announced immediate availability of the new AMD Embedded G-Series processor, the world's first and only Accelerated Processing Unit (APU) for embedded systems. The AMD Embedded G-Series, based on AMD Fusion technology, delivers a complete, full-featured embedded platform and incorporates the new low-power, x86 CPU based on the "Bobcat" core with a world-class DirectX 11-capable GPU and parallel processing engine on a single piece of silicon.

"AMD's commitment is to ensure the game-changing technologies we develop for consumers and the enterprise are also available for the vast and growing embedded market," said Patrick Patla, corporate vice president and general manager, Server and Embedded Division, AMD. "Today, we have a record number of embedded launch partners. They are using the unique advancements of the AMD Embedded G-Series APU to develop a brand new generation of highly differentiated, energy-efficient, small form-factor embedded systems that can deliver the vivid visual experience expected in our always-connected world."
  • This new class of accelerated processor combines more compute capabilities on a single die than any processor in the history of computing and represents opportunity for major advancements in embedded systems.
  • No solution with this level of advanced computing is available for the embedded market today.
  • Numerous embedded systems based on the AMD Embedded G-Series are available today or expected to launch in the coming weeks from companies including Advansus, Compulab, Congatec, Fujitsu, Haier, iEi, Kontron, Mitec, Quixant, Sintrones, Starnet, WebDT, Wyse, and many others.
  • Expected products include graphics-intensive solutions like digital signage, internet-ready set top boxes, mobile and desktop thin clients, casino gaming machines, point-of-sale kiosks, and small form factor PCs, as well as numerous single board computers (SBCs).
  • Shane Rau, research director of Computing and Storage Semiconductors at IDC, expects shipments of processors for embedded systems to increase at a double digit rate each year for the next five years.
  • This brand new platform continues AMD's mission to lower power, shrink physical component area, and reduce the costs of designing and producing x86 embedded systems.
AMD has assessed many of the trends shaping today's embedded market, including the ever-pressing need for power efficiency and a small footprint, along with high CPU performance, full feature sets, and a strong graphics solution. The embedded market is one where differentiation can be critical to the long-term success of a design. The AMD Embedded G-Series APU provides a small, open and flexible platform where system designers can be creative yet still meet strict requirements around development cost.

Design and Development Support
  • The open development ecosystem for the AMD Embedded G-Series platform includes multiple BIOS options, support for various Microsoft Windows, Linux, and real-time operating systems, the integrated OpenCL programming environment, and source-level debug tools.
  • AMD provides a dedicated design support team to help customers create distinctive new products and bring them to market quickly.
  • Online resources include an embedded developer portal, AMD embedded product selection guide and customer-submitted details on available boards and complete systems.
AMD Embedded G-Series APU Specifications
  • 1 or 2 x86 "Bobcat" CPU cores with 1MB L2 cache, 64-bit Floating Point Unit
  • Up to 1.6 GHz
  • 9W and 18W TDP
  • Array of SIMD Engines
  • DirectX(R) 11 capable graphics
  • Industry-leading 3D and graphics processing
  • 3rd Generation Unified Video Decoder
  • Power management features, including C6 and power gating
  • DDR3 800-1066 memory with support for 64 bit channel and 2 DIMMs
  • Ball Grid Array (BGA) package
  • 890mm physical footprint, including the AMD Fusion I/O Controller Hub
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49 Comments on AMD Delivers the World's First and Only APU for Embedded Systems

#1
Thatguy
Easy Rhino said:
since when do people who run atom procs need dx11 ?
Direct Compute is a huge performance booster in alot of CPU heavy applications. DX support brings direct compute.
Posted on Reply
#2
n-ster
Thatguy said:
Direct Compute is a huge performance booster in alot of CPU heavy applications. DX support brings direct compute.
IIRC DirectCompute can run on DX10 perfectly fine
Posted on Reply
#3
Thatguy
n-ster said:
IIRC DirectCompute can run on DX10 perfectly fine
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DirectX

also dx11 better supports multithreading. I see no mention of directCompute for gpu acceleration in the dx10 article AFAIK dx10 does not support DC.
Posted on Reply
#4
streetfighter 2
My only complaint is when I buy one of these suckers to build an HTPC for my mom how is she not going to think it's just an oddly shapen rock?

Can't they make these things bigger? :roll:
Posted on Reply
#6
JF-AMD
AMD Rep (Server)
Easy Rhino said:
since when do people who run atom procs need dx11 ?
There are a lot of embedded applications that benefit from richer graphics. Gaming devices, medical imaging, set top boxes, kiosks with interactive media, things along those lines.

Embedded platforms are often built with an expectation of 5 or more years of life. So, in that sense, by the time these things are halfway through their life, there is still a need for future graphics.

If you were a cable company building an IPTV set top box that needed to stream content from 2011 through 2016, would you want DX10 or DX11?
Posted on Reply
#7
Thatguy
JF-AMD said:
There are a lot of embedded applications that benefit from richer graphics. Gaming devices, medical imaging, set top boxes, kiosks with interactive media, things along those lines.

Embedded platforms are often built with an expectation of 5 or more years of life. So, in that sense, by the time these things are halfway through their life, there is still a need for future graphics.

If you were a cable company building an IPTV set top box that needed to stream content from 2011 through 2016, would you want DX10 or DX11?
I am waiting for the 28nm ARM competitor annoucements. I know you guys are building a arm killer for phones with the APU tech.

I would love to see a world of just one damn instruction set.
Posted on Reply
#8
Easy Rhino
Linux Advocate
JF-AMD said:
There are a lot of embedded applications that benefit from richer graphics. Gaming devices, medical imaging, set top boxes, kiosks with interactive media, things along those lines.

Embedded platforms are often built with an expectation of 5 or more years of life. So, in that sense, by the time these things are halfway through their life, there is still a need for future graphics.

If you were a cable company building an IPTV set top box that needed to stream content from 2011 through 2016, would you want DX10 or DX11?
well i certainly wouldn't use something that calls itself, "the world's first." they are always fraught with problems. i would wait to see it out in the wild for several months unless of course the guy selling them to me is willing to massively discount them. and by the time the product gets all of its bugs worked out i will have settled with trusty dx10 for all of my embedded needs.
Posted on Reply
#9
wahdangun
Easy Rhino said:
well i certainly wouldn't use something that calls itself, "the world's first." they are always fraught with problems. i would wait to see it out in the wild for several months unless of course the guy selling them to me is willing to massively discount them. and by the time the product gets all of its bugs worked out i will have settled with trusty dx10 for all of my embedded needs.
what ??? you can still use your "trusty" DX 10 code on it :rolleyes:

btw its for embedded entertainment thing, like karaoke box or even arcade machine, so its need latest visual enchantment
Posted on Reply
#10
Easy Rhino
Linux Advocate
wahdangun said:
what ??? you can still use your "trusty" DX 10 code on it :rolleyes:

btw its for embedded entertainment thing, like karaoke box or even arcade machine, so its need latest visual enchantment
my point is if you resell products that use embedded systems you go with a proven product, not with "the world's first." yea, dx11 has a couple of nice features of dx10 but the difference is negligible on these tiny chips. the headache and customer service overhead isnt worth it IMO. i would just go with something Intel or VIA was offering.
Posted on Reply
#11
Thatguy
Easy Rhino said:
my point is if you resell products that use embedded systems you go with a proven product, not with "the world's first." yea, dx11 has a couple of nice features of dx10 but the difference is negligible on these tiny chips. the headache and customer service overhead isnt worth it IMO. i would just go with something Intel or VIA was offering.
I keep forgetting the AMD has never made the stars core or a dx 11 gpu before.

silly me.
Posted on Reply
#12
pr0n Inspector
Thatguy said:
I keep forgetting the AMD has never made the stars core or a dx 11 gpu before.

silly me.
Yes, because "it just works". Testing is for sissies.
Posted on Reply
#13
Thatguy
pr0n Inspector said:
Yes, because "it just works". Testing is for sissies.
all they did for the most part was shrunk and integrated the pcie bus and associated hardware and stuck it on a die. I am sure they tested its performance we saw working silicon like 10 months ago popping up at a tech demo or investors day. Maybe it was hotchips.

Either way, this thing is likely solid as can be.

However silly comments like this one and the one above it, are that silly. AMD knows how to make chips.
Posted on Reply
#14
Easy Rhino
Linux Advocate
Thatguy said:
all they did for the most part was shrunk and integrated the pcie bus and associated hardware and stuck it on a die. I am sure they tested its performance we saw working silicon like 10 months ago popping up at a tech demo or investors day. Maybe it was hotchips.

Either way, this thing is likely solid as can be.

However silly comments like this one and the one above it, are that silly. AMD knows how to make chips.
it's not the chips. it's the software that makes the chip work that is untested...
Posted on Reply
#15
Thatguy
Easy Rhino said:
it's not the chips. it's the software that makes the chip work that is untested...
Its going to basically be the same software. Same hardware " for all intensive purposes".
Posted on Reply
#16
Easy Rhino
Linux Advocate
Thatguy said:
Its going to basically be the same software. Same hardware " for all intensive purposes".
it can't possible be the same software as it is a brand new chip.
Posted on Reply
#17
n-ster
AMD isn't a completely new company, why would you think they'd screw it up? AMD know what they are doing, sure there is a chance that they MIGHT perhaps possibly maybe screw something up, doesn't means that they will. Innovation and something new doesn't mean it is bad. Hell, the world would be nowhere if everyone was scared to try something a little bit newer.
Posted on Reply
#18
Easy Rhino
Linux Advocate
n-ster said:
AMD isn't a completely new company, why would you think they'd screw it up? AMD know what they are doing, sure there is a chance that they MIGHT perhaps possibly maybe screw something up, doesn't means that they will. Innovation and something new doesn't mean it is bad. Hell, the world would be nowhere if everyone was scared to try something a little bit newer.
im not saying they would screw it up. i am saying most companies go with proven tech rather than invest millions in something that is "the world's first."
Posted on Reply
#19
n-ster
they spend millions to innovate and make that new thing proven tech. How do you thing the current proven tech was made? It was first the world's first at some point before becoming proven tech.

Give the "world's first" a chance.
Posted on Reply
#20
Thatguy
Easy Rhino said:
im not saying they would screw it up. i am saying most companies go with proven tech rather than invest millions in something that is "the world's first."
I'm not really seeing alot of firsts outside of the packaging and integration. the software ecosystem will be just fine.

mole hill meet mountain.
Posted on Reply
#21
pr0n Inspector
n-ster said:
they spend millions to innovate and make that new thing proven tech. How do you thing the current proven tech was made? It was first the world's first at some point before becoming proven tech.

Give the "world's first" a chance.
They will. After a year, or two.
Posted on Reply
#22
wahdangun
Easy Rhino said:
it can't possible be the same software as it is a brand new chip.
didn't embedded system develop their own software ??? and because its X86 so they can use windows based system (wich are a "proven" software) and tbh, usually embedded system just run one specific software like karaoke, games and etc. so if they can't iron out the bug then it was their problem and not AMD because this APU is just a graphic card on CPU die.


and btw if you mean world first is unproven and unreliable, then why the hell AMD gain market share with their opeteron64, i mean isn't server need more reliability than embedded system ??
Posted on Reply
#23
cdawall
where the hell are my stars
JF-AMD said:
That market is not about benchmarks. It's about cost, size, board size, power/heat and the level of component integration.

In those areas we rock.
so why isn't this passive? most embedded systems try to do without fans mostly due to location and lack of well cleaning
Posted on Reply
#24
JF-AMD
AMD Rep (Server)
wahdangun said:
didn't embedded system develop their own software ??? and because its X86 so they can use windows based system (wich are a "proven" software) and tbh, usually embedded system just run one specific software like karaoke, games and etc. so if they can't iron out the bug then it was their problem and not AMD because this APU is just a graphic card on CPU die.


and btw if you mean world first is unproven and unreliable, then why the hell AMD gain market share with their opeteron64, i mean isn't server need more reliability than embedded system ??
There is lots of embedded x86 sw (linux/windows based). Proprietary OS's still exist but the growth is in standard OS's.

cdawall said:
so why isn't this passive? most embedded systems try to do without fans mostly due to location and lack of well cleaning
There are plenty of passive designs.
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