Monday, August 15th 2011

Sandy Bridge-E Won't Pack Stock Coolers, Intel to Sell them Separately

Intel's upcoming Core i7 processors in the LGA2011 package, codenamed "Sandy Bridge-E," will come in a unique package that's completely different from what's being reported as AMD's, in which self-contained liquid CPU coolers will be bundled with some FX-series processors. Intel's upcoming Core i7-3820, Core i7-3930K and the Core i7-3960X Extreme Edition processor boxes will lack Intel's certified (stock) heatsink-fan (HSF). Instead, Intel plans to sell the certified coolers separately, probably having the same market reach and availability as the processors themselves.

The idea behind this is that the target users of Sandy Bridge-E will most likely use third-party cooling solutions. Hence it makes sense to save them of a chunk of metal they'll probably never use. For those who do use stock cooling, seldom/never overclock, and rely on the Intel certification to go with the cooler, Intel will have the certified cooler available separately for purchase, with its retail partners. Sandy Bridge-E processors have a rated TDP of 130W, though tests by those having access to engineering samples have shown that it can reach as much as 180W on load, even without overclocking. It is expected that PC cooling products manufacturers will have entire lines of LGA2011-ready coolers in time for the launch of Sandy Bridge-E.

Source: VR-Zone
Add your own comment

65 Comments on Sandy Bridge-E Won't Pack Stock Coolers, Intel to Sell them Separately

#1
Sir B. Fannybottom
I like this, isn't about $15 of a new amd chip the cooler? I just throw them in a corner, do you think I could sell them to a crap metal guy?
Posted on Reply
#2
Jegergrim
As far as I know they sell them afterwards for up to $35, and for all we know, they could sell the new chips at the exact same price w/o the HSF...
Posted on Reply
#3
Sir B. Fannybottom
Jegergrim said:
As far as I know they sell them afterwards for up to $35, and for all we know, they could sell the new chips at the exact same price w/o the HSF...
Well, it's a new proc for a new socket so there isn't really a set price, heres the question though, if this proc is $1000 and to get a heatsink with it, it's $1005 would you get it? I would, If I'm paying that much, might aswell. They will prob have these bundles, it will prob just be a few bucks more. I think most people would if it's $5 or close to that, $5 is like 2 cups of coffee.
Posted on Reply
#4
Jegergrim
Yes I would, but honestly I would see no reason for Intel/AMD to ship the chips without HSF if we are talking about a 5 dollar difference, I can understand anywhere from 10-15 though
Posted on Reply
#5
Sir B. Fannybottom
Jegergrim said:
Yes I would, but honestly I would see no reason for Intel/AMD to ship the chips without HSF if we are talking about a 5 dollar difference, I can understand anywhere from 10-15 though
I don't know if they would really have these, but why not? I would pay up to $10, and most of the people would too, If you're getting a intel proc you're rich(:laugh: you know it's right, I'm a AMD fanboy and I still think of AMD as a value proc) and that $5 is nothing and you can prob sell it on ebay for a few dollars if they are selling for $30 new.
Posted on Reply
#6
Jegergrim
I personally would save as much as possible to spend on other items, e.g. the ram or PSU, but I understand your logic, in a sense investing the 10 dollars
Posted on Reply
#7
Sir B. Fannybottom
Jegergrim said:
I personally would save as much as possible to spend on other items, e.g. the ram or PSU, but I understand your logic, in a sense investing the 10 dollars
I know that when I wake up I'm gunna read this and realize how much of a retard I am, because I am prob making no sense, but yeah, but that's mainly people who know are going to use it for HTPCs and crunching that they don't care if it's a bit hot.
Posted on Reply
#8
Jegergrim
I believe many people (excluding enthusiasts), would buy it with the HSF like you would, just to have it around in case of need or sell it off afterwards
Posted on Reply
#9
Hotobu
twilyth said:
I can tell that you've never had to do user support. I understand why you think the argument is absurd, but 'absurd' is SOP when doing user support. You know all those old jokes about users calling tech support because their pc didn't work and it turns out the reason is that it wasn't turned on? Those aren't really jokes but true stories.

As a computer forum, I can guarantee that TPU gets an influx of help requests when these chips hit retail. I sincerely hope I'm wrong and I will admit it gladly if I am, but I fear that I will be right.
I have had to do tech support, but I find that most of the time people's problems were more on the side of profound ignorance than stupidity. The on/off switch thing is always funny, but I chalk that up to oversight, senior moment etc.

I have to reiterate that timidness and ignorance tend to go hand in hand. I just can't see a significant amount of the people who don't know that they need a heatsink not being aware enough to see 2 or more well placed warning labels.

Actually an easy way for all of this to be avoided is to require that 2011 motherboards have a circuit that will only complete when the metal from a heatsink is screwed into the mounting holes. If nothing's detected it'll only boot into the UEFI with the same warning and some instructions.
Posted on Reply
#10
eidairaman1
Tatty_One said:
Quite right, and those OEM partners who are going to put high end CPU's in their machines will order a cooler with the CPU no doubt.
Namely Dell. To be serious though shouldnt this lower prices on the cpu since no hs is included anymore.
Posted on Reply
#11
happita
That's what we are hoping. However, Intel has done some shady stuff in the past (like most profitable companies do), so it wouldn't surprise me that if the prices remain the same with no cooler.
Or maybe they can knock it off a measly $10 to make us happy :laugh: /sarcasm
Posted on Reply
#12
Tatty_One
Super Moderator
eidairaman1 said:
Namely Dell. To be serious though shouldnt this lower prices on the cpu since no hs is included anymore.
Problem is, we will never know the price it would have been including a HSF so it may be an excuse to rip people off, look at it this way, their costs will be reduced without including one, let's be generous and assume that they will pass half of those savings to us and they will add the other half to their margin :cool:
Posted on Reply
#13
eidairaman1
Tatty_One said:
Problem is, we will never know the price it would have been including a HSF so it may be an excuse to rip people off, look at it this way, their costs will be reduced without including one, let's be generous and assume that they will pass half of those savings to us and they will add the other half to their margin :cool:
knowing intel it wont happen
Posted on Reply
#14
Unregistered
Hotobu said:
I have had to do tech support, but I find that most of the time people's problems were more on the side of profound ignorance than stupidity. The on/off switch thing is always funny, but I chalk that up to oversight, senior moment etc.

I have to reiterate that timidness and ignorance tend to go hand in hand. I just can't see a significant amount of the people who don't know that they need a heatsink not being aware enough to see 2 or more well placed warning labels.

Actually an easy way for all of this to be avoided is to require that 2011 motherboards have a circuit that will only complete when the metal from a heatsink is screwed into the mounting holes. If nothing's detected it'll only boot into the UEFI with the same warning and some instructions.
I hope you're right. I think most people will have the sense to be cautious and the rest probably would have screwed something else up anyway. But just as an example, take the problem of choosing the right cooler. How many people are going to be able to distinguish between 2011 and some other socket size. Hell, I don't even know which coolers are compatible with which sockets and even a place like Newegg doesn't always spell this out. Now if that particular example is bogus, then what about distinquishing between an AMD and Intel mounting system? That's an easy mistake for a noobie to make. Then we get into issues of applying thermal paste, plugging the fan into the correct header, etc.

All this stuff is obvious to us (well, mostly anyway) but I think even the cautious noobie will be lost unless they decide to buy the Intel recommended heat sink. I'm sure many will do that, but i have to wonder if "many" will mean "all" or even "most."

Like I said, I hope you're right and maybe I'm being unduly pessimistic. It won't be the first time I've been wrong but it will be one of the few times I'll be happy about it. :D
#15
Wile E
Power User
Tatty_One said:
Quite right, and those OEM partners who are going to put high end CPU's in their machines will order a cooler with the CPU no doubt.
Actually, most OEMs don't buy the heatsinks from Intel anyway. They buy OEM packaged chips by the tray, and commission the heatsinks out the the lowest 3rd party bidder. For instance, most of the older Dells I have ripped apart have Cooler Master branded hsf's.
Tatty_One said:
Problem is, we will never know the price it would have been including a HSF so it may be an excuse to rip people off, look at it this way, their costs will be reduced without including one, let's be generous and assume that they will pass half of those savings to us and they will add the other half to their margin :cool:
I don't even care if they pass the savings on to me. It's worth it just to not have to deal with it. I look at it this way, I get the OEM packaging I prefer, but pay the extra for the retail warranty.
Posted on Reply
Add your own comment