Monday, December 29th 2014

MSI X99 Motherboard Achieves World's Fastest DDR4 Memory Clock: 4032 MHz

The MSI X99S SLI PLUS, one of MSI's latest Intel X99 based motherboards, just managed to set the worlds' fastest DDR4 memory clock speed using Kingston Hyper X DDR4 4GB memory in the thands of overclocker Toppc. Running at an amazing 4032 MHz clock speed, the mighty X99S SLI PLUS remained fully stable and was even able to perform everyday tasks while setting this giant milestone at the 4032 MHz clock speed. This great achievement once again shows that the MSI X99S SLI PLUS motherboard is not only packed with an arsenal of features, it also packs plenty of power for heavy workstation tasks such as rendering and calculations.
Stable and highly efficient, packed with features
The new MSI X99S SLI PLUS motherboard presents an arsenal of new features and improvements as well as technical ingenuity. Offering reliable and fast Gigabit LAN from Intel and Nvidia SLI support for enthusiasts looking to pair up multiple graphics cards. Users enjoy blazing fast system boot up and loading of applications and games. Delivering speeds up to 32Gb/s, Turbo M.2 is more than 5 times faster than a regular SATA III 6 Gb/s connection. SATA Express is supported up to 10 Gb/s. Guard-Pro and Military Class 4 provide all the stability you need through carefully selected and tested components and materials.

Find the validation here.
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12 Comments on MSI X99 Motherboard Achieves World's Fastest DDR4 Memory Clock: 4032 MHz

#3
Jorge
I cringe at just how gullible PC enthusiasts are when it comes to DRAM frequency and system performance. For those who don't know the RAM makers are gearing up DDR4 which has no tangible system performance benefits per se over DDR3 (or LV DDR3 if you're concerned about minute power consumption). DDR4 is primarily intended for servers as DDR3 running at 1600 MHz. is not a system bottleneck for a desktop PC running a discrete CPU and real applications. With an APU 2133 MHz. is about the drop off in gains for RAM frequency. Spending more for faster RAM frequency or lower latency is a fools game but it reaps millions for the DRAM companies per month. You can be technically educated or duped - the choice is yours.
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#4
stulid
Blue-Knight
This guy just reached 2052.5. They said 4032 (or 8064)... In this case, I'd be impressed.
The link for the validation shows - 2016.1 MHz (4032MHz).

8064MHz would be a pipe dream.
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#5
FreedomEclipse
~Technological Technocrat~
Jorge
I cringe at just how gullible PC enthusiasts are
Now this is funny, since all you mainly do on this forum is spread misinformation based on your own opinions which are mostly wrong with no link to any proof to back up your claims.
Jorge
DDR4 is primarily intended for servers as DDR3 running at 1600 MHz. is not a system bottleneck for a desktop PC running a discrete CPU and real applications. With an APU 2133 MHz. is about the drop off in gains for RAM frequency. Spending more for faster RAM frequency or lower latency is a fools game but it reaps millions for the DRAM companies per month. You can be technically educated or duped - the choice is yours.
partially true but i think DDR4 is intended for enthusiast platforms as much as anything else. If it was really supposed to be primarily for servers then they would all be ECC ram.

as far as ram speed goes 1600mhz is the sweet spot, but there are performance gains to be had with faster ram albeit very minor and varies heavily on the games you or apps that you use.

APUs will always benefit from faster RAM.
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#6
shhnedo
Blue-Knight
They said 4032 (or 8064)...
8GHz+ effective... yeah, sure.
Posted on Reply
#7
Aquinus
Resident Wat-man
FreedomEclipse
partially true but i think DDR4 is intended for enthusiast platforms as much as anything else. If it was really supposed to be primarily for servers then they would all be ECC ram.
ECC costs more because you need the mechanism for controlling it. Not to mention that adding ECC adds another IC to the memory module. DDR4 is most definitely not for enthusiasts. It's simply an evolution of DDR, nothing more, nothing less.

Also it is more geared towards servers as the CPUs that can truly utilize that kind of bandwidth are 8C+ Xeons when doing some seriously multi-threaded workloads.
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#8
Aquinus
Resident Wat-man
Blue-Knight
How do you explain this?

Not memory intensive work:
800MHz = 72.497s
1066MHz = 72.441s
1333MHz = 72.462s

Memory intensive work:
800MHz = 98.758s
1066MHz = 78.757s
1333MHz = 70.026s

I think it depends what you are doing!? It can make a real difference, especially if you have a lot of work. Or not!?
Please explain the context behind the numbers a bit more. To me, that means very little without more context.
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#9
Aquinus
Resident Wat-man
Blue-Knight
I am not sure how. Sorry! :(
Then don't post numbers if you can't describe where they come from. It's that whole being able to explain yourself thing, it's kind of important when making claims like that.
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#10
Steevo
And here I just made it to DDR3....


Oh well, its fast enough for me, and I imagine that much like DDR3 was at first it offers little advantage over the prior standard for the first couple years, and by then the chips and boards will have enough improvements to give them some real advantages.
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#11
FreedomEclipse
~Technological Technocrat~
Steevo
And here I just made it to DDR3....


Oh well, its fast enough for me, and I imagine that much like DDR3 was at first it offers little advantage over the prior standard for the first couple years, and by then the chips and boards will have enough improvements to give them some real advantages.
Dont worry, DDR3 will be around for a long while yet, they arnt gonna phase it out any time soon.
Posted on Reply
#12
jaggerwild
Jorge
I cringe at just how gullible PC enthusiasts are when it comes to DRAM frequency and system performance. For those who don't know the RAM makers are gearing up DDR4 which has no tangible system performance benefits per se over DDR3 (or LV DDR3 if you're concerned about minute power consumption). DDR4 is primarily intended for servers as DDR3 running at 1600 MHz. is not a system bottleneck for a desktop PC running a discrete CPU and real applications. With an APU 2133 MHz. is about the drop off in gains for RAM frequency. Spending more for faster RAM frequency or lower latency is a fools game but it reaps millions for the DRAM companies per month. You can be technically educated or duped - the choice is yours.
LOL!
Nice bowl of Cheerieo's haaaaaaaaaaaaa! It sells product's, like cars. Some drive um some race um, ever see all the FITTINGS and there prices for tubing? LOL
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