Friday, July 21st 2017

AMD Ryzen Threadripper Motherboards to be Showcased on July 25th

AMD is organizing the "Meet the Experts" webinar, which will focus on AMD's upcoming Ryzen Threadripper motherboard designs and offerings from AMD partners. As we inch closer to AMD's HEDT X399 platform launch, we've gotten confirmation from AMD on Threadripper's specs and pricing. However, the actual motherboards where you're expected to sit your awe-inducing 12 and 16-core processors have largely been absent from the show.

And since AMD knows that processors without a motherboard don't really equate to anything much, the company has invited ASUS, Gigabyte, MSI and ASRock to detail at least some of their X399 motherboards. So far, the motherboards we have some info are the GIGABYTE X399 AORUS Gaming 7 (which has 5x PCIe x16 slots, no PCIe x1 slots, and 3x M.2 slots in an ATX form-factor); the ASUS X399 ROG ZENITH EXTREME (EATX, 4x PCIe x16 slots, 1x PCIe x1 slots, and 2x M.2 slots); the ASROCK X399 Professional Gaming (ATX, 4x PCIe x16 slots, 1x PCIe x1 slots, and 3x M.2 slots); and finally, the ASROCK X399 TAICHI, which counts with the usual ATX form-factor, and offers 4x PCIe x16 slots, 1x PCIe x1 slots, and 3x M.2 slots. All of these seem to be marketed toward gamer enthusiasts, though we'll see some increasingly workstation-geared motherboards closer to or after the launch.
Source: Videocardz
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51 Comments on AMD Ryzen Threadripper Motherboards to be Showcased on July 25th

#26
_JP_
1GBe port. l219V or LM controller, my bet.

EDIT: Every time I see the logo on AMD boards I always think of it like Intel saying: "yeah you can't beat us at this!!! na-na-na-na-na-na" :laugh: It's like putting a Camaro wheel on a Mustang.
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#27
JMccovery
Gotta say, the Zenith Extreme is one awesome looking board. I bet it'll run a good bit north of $600.
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#28
Rothbardian
It seems the ASROCK X399 Professional Gaming comes with 10 gbit Ethernet, nice!
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#29
Prince Valiant
Is there any practical reason for why the PCIe slot is so close to the CPU socket and the left memory slots on the Asus board?
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#30
ironwolf
Mindweaver
Thank god they went with a new CPU retention bracket. I just had to order off a few new AM3 retention brackets to replace one on a failed system. I only have a couple AM3 boxes left. The other one I have a cooler master HSF that replaces it, but to me this a better design. Now if only AMD would stop putting pins on the CPU..
I hear ya. I keep a small pile of retention brackets for AMx around, always have someone come in and one of the nubs on the bracket would be broken off. Never liked those brackets.
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#31
LogitechFan
two sockets glued together basically. look at power delivery and the rest. scales the same as ryzen 7, which is about 30% slower than intel but cheaper. considering there only that many boards, aib partners can't care less about this very niche abomination of a landing pad, just like they did with r7.
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#32
silentbogo
VSG
I am surprised no one else seems to have noted the Intel logo on the AsRock Taichi. Is it for possibly a Thunderbolt port on there?
It says Intel Gigabit Ethernet. Just a bit blurry =)
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#33
Mirkoskji
Prince Valiant
Is there any practical reason for why the PCIe slot is so close to the CPU socket and the left memory slots on the Asus board?
The cooling solution for the VRM north to the socket seems beefier. or at least large. the memory slots are about in the same position relative to the others. I have a Rampage IV black edition, and the lower retention clamps of the memory slots are phisically fixed (they cannot be opened) because tey are near the first pci-e.
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#34
LogitechFan
silentbogo
It says Intel Gigabit Ethernet. Just a bit blurry =)
ASSrock have done it for ages.


Intel nics and wifi are the best, it's a selling point on, any board.
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#35
Athlonite
Has anyone noticed the two Asrock boards are exactly the same but with only a few minor cosmetic differences if you open the images and flick between the two everything component wise and layout wise is the same on each mobo
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#36
VSG
Editor, Reviews & News
Mirkoskji
The cooling solution for the VRM north to the socket seems beefier. or at least large. the memory slots are about in the same position relative to the others. I have a Rampage IV black edition, and the lower retention clamps of the memory slots are phisically fixed (they cannot be opened) because tey are near the first pci-e.
Yeah, I see that now. Thanks!
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#37
Hood
Raevenlord
All of these seem to be marketed toward gamer enthusiasts, though we'll see some increasingly workstation-geared motherboards closer to or after the launch.
AMD is trying to create a mindset among "gamers and enthusiasts" that all these cores/threads will make them superior somehow; it appears to be in full swing with these boards. Epeen is driving this market, a disgusting but inevitable trend. Those who actually have a need or use for 24/32 threads should be the target for their marketing, not a bunch of teenage gamers with more money than brains. Apparently they're after maximum cash before those people realize that they've been had, victims of misguided marketing tactics. I would laugh if it wasn't so sad...
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#38
Octavean
VSG
I am surprised no one else seems to have noted the Intel logo on the AsRock Taichi. Is it for possibly a Thunderbolt port on there?
Even after you pointed it out I still don't see the Intel logo on the AsRock Taichi.

Still, if nothing else perhaps it's for an Intel NIC,......?

People have a tendency to prefer Intel NICs,.......
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#39
Octavean
Hood
AMD is trying to create a mindset among "gamers and enthusiasts" that all these cores/threads will make them superior somehow; it appears to be in full swing with these boards. Epeen is driving this market, a disgusting but inevitable trend. Those who actually have a need or use for 24/32 threads should be the target for their marketing, not a bunch of teenage gamers with more money than brains. Apparently they're after maximum cash before those people realize that they've been had, victims of misguided marketing tactics. I would laugh if it wasn't so sad...
Intel does something similar with their HEDT line and has done so for some time. Both Intel and AMD HEDT line are workstation / quasi server based and I see no issue with using such hardware in the general enthusiast arena.

Its incumbent on those buying such hardware to understand what they are getting and what hardware is best suited for their specific needs / use case.
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#40
Hood
Octavean
Intel does something similar with their HEDT line and has done so for some time. Both Intel and AMD HEDT line are workstation / quasi server based and I see no issue with using such hardware in the general enthusiast arena.

Its incumbent on those buying such hardware to understand what they are getting and what hardware is best suited for their specific needs / use case.
True that. Intel does it too. Now that AMD has come up with a way to make high core counts cheaper than Intel, naturally they're trying to claw back market share any way they can, and one of the ways is by selling people much more powerful hardware than they actually need, by convincing them (with shady marketing tactics) that only losers run quad cores, everyone needs at least 8 cores (Ryzen), or preferably 12 or 16 (TR). It might be just talk, but lots of folks are saying they're buying Threadripper when it comes out, certainly more than the ones who actually need it. I guess we'll see when the sales figures come out in 6 months.
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#43
noname00
Octavean
Even after you pointed it out I still don't see the Intel logo on the AsRock Taichi.

Still, if nothing else perhaps it's for an Intel NIC,......?

People have a tendency to prefer Intel NICs,.......
It's a huge logo on the plastic cover of the back panel - http://images.anandtech.com/doci/11505/x399-taichi.jpg - and it says "Intel Gigabit Ethernet"
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#44
GhostRyder
Nice looking boards!

Wonder what it would be like to Raid 0 or 5 with some real fast M.2 SSD's on these machines.

I had a good laugh when I saw that far right Asrock board, has a big Intel logo on it (Yes I know what its for), just funny to see that predominately displayed like that on an AMD board. Not the first time ive seen it, but for some reason I found it funny.
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#45
Octavean
Hood
True that. Intel does it too. Now that AMD has come up with a way to make high core counts cheaper than Intel, naturally they're trying to claw back market share any way they can, and one of the ways is by selling people much more powerful hardware than they actually need, by convincing them (with shady marketing tactics) that only losers run quad cores, everyone needs at least 8 cores (Ryzen), or preferably 12 or 16 (TR). It might be just talk, but lots of folks are saying they're buying Threadripper when it comes out, certainly more than the ones who actually need it. I guess we'll see when the sales figures come out in 6 months.
I have tentative plans to build an AMD Threadripper based system. However, in my case it will likely be used as a server. I'll likely have to wait though because I am not interested in spending ~$799 USD on the processor alone. So I'll likely wait for the 10 core 20 thread variation.

For what it's worth, I expect that There will be a gaming deficit with AMD Threadripper similar to RyZen 5 and RyZen 7 with respect to Intel offerings like the vaunted Core i7 7700K.

If gaming were my only concern I might go for an Intel Core i7 7700K even over something like the new Core i9 line. The Core i7 7700K is powerful and cost effective option. No need to pay Threadripper or Core i9 prices.
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#46
Hood
Octavean
However, in my case it will likely be used as a server
I can see that. If the server has enough users accessing simultaneously, the extra threads will keep things running smoothly. How many people will have access to your server? I don't know much about the subject, but I'm curious. How many users can access a 20 thread server before it slows down? Sorry about all the questions, I thought that a server can be run on much slower (and cheaper) hardware. Please elaborate.
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#47
Chloe Price
Just realized that those two Asrocks are almost identical. But damn, that Asus Zenith looks great!
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#48
uuuaaaaaa
Waiting for an Asus WS board for ThreadRipper!
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#49
Naql
Hood
True that. Intel does it too. Now that AMD has come up with a way to make high core counts cheaper than Intel, naturally they're trying to claw back market share any way they can, and one of the ways is by selling people much more powerful hardware than they actually need, by convincing them (with shady marketing tactics) that only losers run quad cores, everyone needs at least 8 cores (Ryzen), or preferably 12 or 16 (TR). It might be just talk, but lots of folks are saying they're buying Threadripper when it comes out, certainly more than the ones who actually need it. I guess we'll see when the sales figures come out in 6 months.
I'm an old, graybeard programmer who does 3D Rendering as a hobby. I'll put one of these babies to good use in the RenderBeast.
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#50
Octavean
Hood
I can see that. If the server has enough users accessing simultaneously, the extra threads will keep things running smoothly. How many people will have access to your server? I don't know much about the subject, but I'm curious. How many users can access a 20 thread server before it slows down? Sorry about all the questions, I thought that a server can be run on much slower (and cheaper) hardware. Please elaborate.
Probably mainly as a file server with transcode duty for multiple users locally. It would also run a number of virtual machines. I'd probably want dual SSD for read / write cache and 10GbE. If it could have an internal SSD that would serve as a dedicated DAC that could be useful as well.

I was looking at some QNAP NAS units and some of them are quite attractive like the QNAP TVS-1282T3 which has 12 bays, Thunderbolt 3, 10GbE, Intel Core i7 7700 and up to 64GB of RAM. Still it costs about ~$3800 USD depending on where you buy. I've got almost everything I need for a server. All I would really need is an AMD Threadripper motherboard, processor and cooler. Maybe not even a cooler since there are indications that Threadripper might ship with a cooler. Although, I might need a PSU depending on power requirements.
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