Tuesday, April 24th 2018

Samsung Announces the 970 PRO and 970 EVO Series M.2 NVMe SSDs

Samsung Electronics, today introduced the Samsung 970 PRO and EVO, the third generation of its industry-leading consumer solid state drive (SSD) lineup. Having led the market with the first consumer-focused NVMe SSD in 2015, Samsung continues to push the performance barriers with this latest generation of SSDs that are built for tech enthusiasts and professionals so that they can enjoy higher bandwidth for intensive workloads on PCs and workstations.

"Samsung has led the NVMe SSD industry since its inception, and the company continues to define the latest standards of consumer storage with unprecedented performance of the 970 PRO and EVO SSDs," said Un-Soo Kim, senior vice president of Brand Product Marketing, Memory Business at Samsung Electronics. "The 970 series sets a new bar in all aspects for the NVMe SSD market with groundbreaking performance, superior reliability and best-in-class capacity."
The Samsung 970 PRO and EVO are designed based on the M.2 form factor standard and with the latest PCIe Gen 3×4 lane interface. The 970 series maximizes the potential of NVMe bandwidth, delivering unparalleled performance for processing large volumes of data, including 3D, 4K graphics work, high-end games and data analytics.

The 970 PRO enables sequential read speed of up to 3,500 MB/s and sequential write speed of up to 2,700 MB/s, while the EVO features sequential read speed of up to 3,500 MB/s and sequential write speed of up to 2,500 MB/s. The sequential write speeds represent an enhancement of up to 30 percent over the previous generation, thanks to Samsung's latest V-NAND technology and the newly designed Phoenix controller. The 970 EVO, in particular, utilizes the Intelligent TurboWrite technology, which uses a large buffer size of up to 78GB to enable faster write speeds.

In addition to the advancements in performance levels, the 970 PRO and EVO deliver exceptional endurance and reliability. Featuring a five-year warranty, or up to 1,200 terabytes written - 50 percent higher than those provided for the previous generation - the 970 PRO and EVO are built to last. The Dynamic Thermal Guard technology safeguards against overheating by automatically monitoring and maintaining optimal operating temperatures, while a heat spreader and new nickel-coated controller further lower the SSD temperatures.

The 970 PRO and EVO also provide greater system design flexibility for the high-performance computing systems. Offering a variety of high capacity options in a compact M.2 form factor - including the single-sided 2TB EVO model - the 970 series enables convenient storage expansion across a wide range of computing devices.

The 970 EVO will be offered in 250GB, 500GB, 1TB and 2TB8 capacities, and the 970 PRO in 512GB and 1TB capacities. The 970 PRO and EVO will be available for purchase worldwide starting May 7, 2018, with manufacturer's suggested retail prices starting at $329.99 and $119.99 USD, respectively. For more information, including warranty details, please visit www.samsung.com/SSD, www.samsungssd.com.
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25 Comments on Samsung Announces the 970 PRO and 970 EVO Series M.2 NVMe SSDs

#2
jabbadap
3bit MLC, still the same marketing Scammy'O'Sammy. Well yeah I do know that the reason for it is TLC is registered trademark of Sandisk. Nice to see competition, if it only drives prices lower. But is there some sort of error, 512GB drive for $329.99 pro drive!?
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#3
springs113
Reading reviews...so far this seems to be worse than what it's replacing. It also trails the WD black from Western Digital to a degree. It's faster but uses more power. I guess a bonus is the extension of a 3 to 5 year warranty.
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#4
ShurikN
springs113
Reading reviews...so far this seems to be worse than what it's replacing. It also trails the WD black from Western Digital to a degree. It's faster but uses more power. I guess a bonus is the extension of a 3 to 5 year warranty.
Honestly don't know which reviews you were reading, but I've just finished with Tom's review (the most extensive SSD benchmarking I've seen to date) of the PRO, and compared to the same capacity 960PRO (1TB), it's better in literally every metric.
The beginning of the conclusion says it all
As we expected, the Samsung 970 Pro came out on top in nearly every test. When another product managed to squeeze in a win, it wasn't by much. The 970 Pro, the only consumer NVMe SSD still shipping with MLC flash, has solidified its position at the top of the NAND-based SSD market. There isn't a serious MLC competitor in sight, so the 970 Pro will likely lead for another few years.
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#5
springs113
ShurikN
Honestly don't know which reviews you were reading, but I've just finished with Tom's review (the most extensive SSD benchmarking I've seen to date) of the PRO, and compared to the same capacity 960PRO (1TB), it's better in literally every metric.
The beginning of the conclusion says it all
It is not that much faster than the 960 evo or pros that they're replacing. The only real good thing is the warranty. The price not being raised is ok, but the improvements are marginal at best. It loses too much to its own predecessors if you ask me. The improvement in benchmark numbers aren't gonna be noticeable to "me" as I have already got a 960 pro drive. The appealing factor to "me" is that I was looking to get another drive and the price points are the same...I could honestly care less about the warranty changes. But as a game storage/content creation drive I only have 3 drives I'd consider...this new replacement(formerly the 960s) the HP EX920 and the WD black. Being that the HP cost considerably less and performs on par I'd probably go with that first followed by the WD.
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#6
bug
These are way more expensive than, say, a Crucial MX500, but in 4k random reads only yield 10% better performance. It's time Samsung took a look at their pricing, imho.
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#7
xkm1948
I am interested in the thermals. My 960 Pro is freaking hot.
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#8
Tomgang
Dosent matter how they perform right now for me.

They cant work on my old x58 system any way and the two samsung 950 PRO m.2 ssd i have now, is doing a good job on making my old system fast and snappy any way.

But for when i eventually move on to a new platform. Two of these in raid 0 might be my os drive.

xkm1948
I am interested in the thermals. My 960 Pro is freaking hot.
M.2 nvme ssd are running hot with out a cooling profile. The 950 pro's i have are also running hot. So i use pcie to m.2 adaptor with build in cooling profile.
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#9
RH92
It's nice to see Samsung improving an already excellent product but i would like them to focus more on how to drive the price down in order for those V-Nand based nvme ssd's to become the new standard .
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#10
Fx
In addition to the longer warranty is the increased endurance. This is a very big deal for many people. Historically, endurance has been the weak spot for SSDs and Samsung recognizing this is addressing this. For example, greater endurance will give you greater longevity of the drive when running VMs and other write-intensive tasks.
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#12
Octopuss
I already have 1TB variant of 960 PRO, but I might just grab 250GB 970 PRO to replace the SATA SSD I have as a system disk. No extra cables=win.
edit: Oh damn, no 250GB for PRO :(
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#13
cucker tarlson
AnarchoPrimitiv
The best storage reviews on the entire internet are at SSDReview

970 Pro http://www.thessdreview.com/our-reviews/nvme/samsung-970-pro-m-2-nvme-ssd-review-1tb-the-cost-of-being-the-worlds-best/
970 EVO http://www.thessdreview.com/our-reviews/nvme/samsung-970-evo-m-2-nvme-ssd-review-500gb-1tb-evo-becomes-a-top-tier-ssd/
I think tweaktown has better ssd reviews. They always put emphasis on low queue depth writing performance, cause when you consider performance you're getting with ssds that's really where your bread is buttered.
970 evo and 970 pro is a lot like what they did with 860 pro and evo, 64-layer TLC and MLC replaced 48-layer NAND. It's supposedly got staggering endurance, but as far as overall performance, there are some really crazy performing drives in the mid-range segment like sandisk extreme pro, wd black (new version), 760p and m9pe. I'd prefer samsung but all is price dependent.
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#14
trparky
Samsung is simply continuing the excellence that they've always had in the SSD market. As far as I'm concerned there's no better SSD to buy than a Samsung.
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#15
Fx
trparky
Samsung is simply continuing the excellence that they've always had in the SSD market. As far as I'm concerned there's no better SSD to buy than a Samsung.
They are the only drive I've bought for years now. Even when I need to go a little cheap, I just pick an Evo.
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#16
trparky
Me too. I have an 850 EVO in my current system and my next system will have an 860 EVO in it. Why? Because they are just that good.
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#17
bug
trparky
Me too. I have an 850 EVO in my current system and my next system will have an 860 EVO in it. Why? Because they are just that good.
I have an EVO, but I got the MX300 next. Samsung are probably the best from a technical point of view, but to me, the ROI just wasn't there.
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#19
trparky
Prima.Vera
tooooooooo expensive....
Hey, if you want good performance you better be willing to pony up the cash. Name me an SSD that even comes close to the performance of a Samsung SSD. Yes, I know about the Crucial MX500 and the new Western Digital Black SSD, they're close seconds.
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#20
bug
trparky
Hey, if you want good performance you better be willing to pony up the cash. Name me an SSD that even comes close to the performance of a Samsung SSD. Yes, I know about the Crucial MX500 and the new Western Digital Black SSD, they're close seconds.
Depends on your definition of performance. For normal usage, performance is dictated by QD1 4k random reads. Going by that, nearly everyone comes close.
That said, if you need a SSD for more server-type oriented workloads, performance for QD>1 may be more relevant to you. If you edit a lot of video, then sequential performance numbers come into play. But for basically everyone else, these just command an almost twice the cost per GB over other drives that will do the job just as well.

Or to put it another way: what I want to see from SSDs, is better QD1 4k random reads and lower cost per GB. Year after year Samsung manages to improve in every other aspect, but competition has managed to lower the cost per GB.
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#21
wrathchild_67
trparky
Hey, if you want good performance you better be willing to pony up the cash. Name me an SSD that even comes close to the performance of a Samsung SSD.
Intel's 900p beats everything right now due to the fast low queue depth 4k speeds, and you pay for that performance.
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#22
voltage
I would love to see a head 2 head review of the 970 PRO and Intel's 280GB Optane 900P PCIe 3.0 x4 Internal SSD. I wonder if any tech site will have the guts to do that review?
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#23
bug
voltage
I would love to see a head 2 head review of the 970 PRO and Intel's 280GB Optane 900P PCIe 3.0 x4 Internal SSD. I wonder if any tech site will have the guts to do that review?
I believe the 900p has already been pitted against the 960. 970 isn't much better than that, so you can do the math.
But this is purely academic, as Optane is still in its infancy and not a viable option for the vast majority of users out there.
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#24
InVasMani
voltage
I would love to see a head 2 head review of the 970 PRO and Intel's 280GB Optane 900P PCIe 3.0 x4 Internal SSD. I wonder if any tech site will have the guts to do that review?
I'd rather see SuperCache Express/Fancy Cache compared to NVDIMM and Optane, but I'm not holding my breath on it.
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#25
Parn
bug
Depends on your definition of performance. For normal usage, performance is dictated by QD1 4k random reads. Going by that, nearly everyone comes close.
That said, if you need a SSD for more server-type oriented workloads, performance for QD>1 may be more relevant to you. If you edit a lot of video, then sequential performance numbers come into play. But for basically everyone else, these just command an almost twice the cost per GB over other drives that will do the job just as well.

Or to put it another way: what I want to see from SSDs, is better QD1 4k random reads and lower cost per GB. Year after year Samsung manages to improve in every other aspect, but competition has managed to lower the cost per GB.
I'm more interested in QD1 4k performance also. All these QD64 figures posted are pretty much meaningless for consumers. In fact they give you unrealistic high expectations for normal daily usage.
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