Friday, June 1st 2018

ADATA XPG SPECTRIX D80 RGB Memory Module with Liquid Nitrogen Cooling Hits 5531 MHz Mark

ADATA Technology, a leading manufacturer of high-performance DRAM modules and NAND Flash products, announces that it has overclocked its XPG SPECTRIX D80 RGB DDR4 memory module to 5531 MHz in a liquid-nitrogen-cooled configuration. The milestone was achieved through the joint effort of ADATA's XPG team and MSI's OC team. The result was confirmed by HWBot, and reaffirms ADATA's strong R&D capabilities and the outstanding performance offered by the XPG SPECTRIX D80 RGB memory module.

XPG SPECTRIX D80 DDR4 RGB is the world's first RGB DDR4 memory with a hybrid liquid-air cooling system. Utilizing the combination of a liquid heatsink, an aluminum heatsink, and thermally conductive materials on the PCB, the SPECTRIX D80 offers comprehensive thermal cooling capabilities and delivers outstanding performance.
The XPG SPECTRIX D80 RGB memory hit the 5531 MHz threshold in a liquid-nitrogen-cooled configuration featuring MSI X299 GAMING PRO CARBON AC. The memory module will be at Computex Taipei at ADATA's booth (I0608) for demonstration purposes.

Link to HWbot website: http://hwbot.org/submission/3864950_ren_kei_yang_memory_frequency_ddr4_sdram_2765.6_mhz
Add your own comment

5 Comments on ADATA XPG SPECTRIX D80 RGB Memory Module with Liquid Nitrogen Cooling Hits 5531 MHz Mark

#1
dj-electric
"A memory known for its special cooling broke a record, by using another cooling method".
Posted on Reply
#2
Vayra86
"dj-electric said:
"A memory known for its special cooling broke a record, by using another cooling method".
:toast:
Posted on Reply
#3
Hood
I don't see how this "liquid cooling chamber" does anything useful. According to Adata's website, "The SPECTRIX D80’s liquid heatsink has a hermetically sealed design that ensures it’s completely airtight. You can rest assure that no gas or liquid will leak or evaporate away. Meanwhile, the non-conductive fluid inside has the thermal stability and conductivity needed for efficient cooling". It just has two tabs on it's aluminum heat sink that extend into the liquid chamber, but no way to remove heat from the liquid. Another marketing gimmick that's bound to fail - in the market place and all over your motherboard. That's why they use non-conductive fluid (probably mineral oil) - to avoid lawsuits from shorting out people's systems when it leaks. For this so called "phase change" to work, the heat must be radiated somewhere or it just saturates the fluid until no phase change can occur. Here's one apparently exploding -
Posted on Reply
#4
Caring1
The average person doesn't care what speed they can attain under L.N.
What are the specs and SPD ratings, what speed can we expect under normal use?
Posted on Reply
#5
DRDNA
"Caring1 said:
The average person doesn't care what speed they can attain under L.N.
What are the specs and SPD ratings, what speed can we expect under normal use?
http://www.xpg.com/en/feature/553
"
Overclocking unleashed
The SPECTRIX D80 isn’t just for the avid gamer and DIY enthusiast, but also the overclocker! The SPECTRIX D80 provides a wide frequency range from 2666MHz to 5000MHz with support for Intel® X299 2666 MHz and AMD AM4/Ryzen platforms. Also, preconfigured Intel® XMP (Extreme Memory Profile) 2.0 profiles allow for quick, reliable overclocking.

"
-----------------
looks to me as though the liquid tube is affixed to an internal heatsync to memory modules and then the aluminum outside heatsyncs cool the water and not the actual memory chips. I may be off on my assesment but its hard to tell from this pic.But anyway I hope its an improvement.


Seems as though a little fan cooling the heatsyncs would have been just as effective.
Posted on Reply