Wednesday, July 4th 2018

TechPowerUp Processor Survey Results: The Ryzen Effect is Real

Late May 2018, TechPowerUp started a front-page poll asking people which processor they use. 37 days and 16,140 responses later, we have a general idea of where the desktop processor market stands among our readers (predominantly PC gamers and enthusiasts). The top-two responses to our survey were 4th generation Core "Haswell," followed by the preceding two generations ("Ivy Bridge" and "Sandy Bridge"). This speaks volumes as to the hole Intel dug itself into, due to lack of competition from AMD. Processors that are 4-7 years old still run today's gaming PCs, and don't bottleneck today's games, as long as graphics cards keep getting faster (where there has been relatively more competition than the CPU market).

Despite being newer, fewer respondents use 6th generation "Skylake" and 7th generation "Kaby Lake" processors than older generations, because those on something like 4th generation "Haswell" or even "Ivy Bridge," don't see the value in upgrading. But then something changed in 2017 - AMD became competitive again, and forced an increase in CPU core counts across the segment. AMD's Ryzen processor family, including both its 1st and 2nd generations, are better received in the market than Intel's competing 8th generation "Coffee Lake" and 7th generation "Kaby Lake." The data stands to validate the "Ryzen effect," the idea that the introduction of Ryzen disrupted Intel's near-monopoly, increased core-counts, and brought innovation back to the segment.
More of our readers use AMD Ryzen processors than Intel Core "Coffee Lake" and "Kaby Lake." So in the period following Intel's launch of 7th generation "Kaby Lake" (slightly before the launch of Ryzen), more AMD processors were installed among our readers. This of course doesn't mean that there are more AMD users, since we're not counting pre-Ryzen Intel generations such as "Skylake" and "Haswell." This seems to suggest that the "Ryzen effect" is not a myth.
In the time since 2nd generation "Sandy Bridge" (circa 2012), very little innovation has been there from Intel for PC gamers. The mainstream-desktop segment has had to content with no more than 4 cores, and there's been very little IPC increments between generations to warrant upgrades. The result is that there are plenty of people with >4 year old processors, which are fast enough for today's gaming. The data also shows that in a shorter span of time, AMD sold more Ryzen chips.

Of course there are limitations to our survey. The data is sourced from a user poll among our readers, in contrast to the Steam Hardware Survey, which gets its data by probing the hardware of a machine. As we mentioned earlier, our readers are composed of PC gamers and enthusiasts, and hence our data isn't in line with the general market (that includes other use-cases).
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96 Comments on TechPowerUp Processor Survey Results: The Ryzen Effect is Real

#51
Fluffmeister
"ShurikN said:
I can name at least 2 members right of the bat.
Do it!
Posted on Reply
#52
AlwaysHope
The survey should have had option for AMD FX series, the only way to express it was with ticking "other" box.
Sure it's 2012 tech, but value for money with OC & gaming at 1080P/60hz, they are within reach of most budget inclined OC enthusiasts & have been for some 5 yrs b4 Ryzen revolution.

But what does "other" mean? it appears to be anything other than 2 - 8 gens Intel platforms or new Ryzen stuff.
Some of us have 1st gen i7 or even older LGA775 platform for gaming or other uses.
Wish TPU surveys in future would consider ALL of the enthusiasts market & not selected lines of cpus. At least going back a decade imo.
Browsing on sites like ebay indicates these older platforms are still actively being traded.

Because a TPU member is not up with the latest n' greatest OC masterpieces does not mean they are not enthusiast or OC inclined.

Just my 2 cents. :)
Posted on Reply
#53
rodneyhchef
Still clinging onto my 2600k here which I bought nearly 7 years ago. :twitch:

This computer is like trigger's broom except for the processor. I've been through cases, hard drives, GPUs, ram and one motherboard but the CPU remains.
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#54
Fx
"Flyordie said:
Not to be a buzzkill on the poll...

But some of us still use Vishera/Bulldozer based CPUs from AMD. Would have been nice to include that in the poll. :)
Ok, you are making me feel bad. I have a 8350, but to be fair, I have a 2600x in my Amazon shopping cart that was placed there on Tuesday. :D

I don't want to go with 2700x because I don't want to spend $100 more on a processor that will be replaced by Ryzen 2.
Posted on Reply
#55
dirtyferret
These processors are so powerful it's a moot point (but fun at times) arguing over performance . I have a 7600k @ 4.8ghz and 8600k, I can't tell the difference between the two while gaming, surfing, , downloading, and installing software. Honestly when I had my 2500k @ 4.4ghz with a SSD, it seemed a fraction less responsive then the 7600k.

I know AMD fans scream from the mountains about how much multi-threaded power the Ryzen six & eight cores have and the single threaded performance is "good enough" but you can make the same argument for an OC Intel's quad and/or i5-8400 with great single core performance and "good enough" multi-core performance for most people.
Posted on Reply
#56
_UV_
"dj-electric said:
I'm talking about stores that have complete freedom to sell whatever they want
Never seen such stores making real big number of sales, all the time they have "great deals" from brands like Acer/HP/DELL and so on, mostly Intel CPUs.

"Flyordie said:
But some of us still use Vishera/Bulldozer based CPUs from AMD. Would have been nice to include that in the poll
"AlwaysHope said:
The survey should have had option for AMD FX series, the only way to express it was with ticking "other" box.
Sure it's 2012 tech, but value for money with OC & gaming at 1080P/60hz, they are within reach of most budget inclined OC enthusiasts & have been for some 5 yrs b4 Ryzen revolution.

But what does "other" mean? it appears to be anything other than 2 - 8 gens Intel platforms or new Ryzen stuff.
Some of us have 1st gen i7 or even older LGA775 platform for gaming or other uses.
Agree, me and friends and many people stop buying new systems for 2 reasons: 4th gen Intel was bought mostly by people with dead mobo, so DDR4 was skipped early days when prices was acceptable, second - multi threading bring new life into "obsolete" Sandy Bridge, Westmere and ofc Vishera, all you need just add recent GPU and a bit of ram.

In "real world" most people don't care about what inside a PC until it dead or struggles then trying to display Facebook photos. In real world people upgrading C2D or FX4xxx to FX8xxx or 4-6th gen Pentiums to Ryzen 1200/1600, or staying on 1-2 gen I7 (thanks to Chinese Xeons).

I consider buying Ryzen or Threadripper (4 ch RAM and plenty of full x16(8) slots) since launch day, but first was RAM flaws and heavily inflated prices (waiting for a good deal, cause 64-128GB would be half of cost of a new system if not more), now it has refresh and especially refresh motherboards needed to get full auto OC potential (AMD told us something a bit different about this platform, technically you can use "old" mobo with refresh CPU, but you will never willing to do), next year we get new refresh (i mean new CPU, but) with maybe doubling cores count in desktop and HEDT segments (me currently waiting for this, and i think it will need new board or new revision - more cores = more consumption). Refresh every year means, people buying something for next 3+ years waiting for most powerful thing to be released.
Posted on Reply
#57
dirtyferret
"GinoLatino said:
Care to share those "real market" numbers you are holding on to?
Gartner group typically displays PC shipped with processor in a quarterly basis. Steam hardware survey shows typically hardware on a global PC base.
Posted on Reply
#58
Tomorrow
"dirtyferret said:
These processors are so powerful it's a moot point (but fun at times) arguing over performance . I have a 7600k @ 4.8ghz and 8600k, I can't tell the difference between the two while gaming, surfing, , downloading, and installing software. Honestly when I had my 2500k @ 4.4ghz with a SSD, it seemed a fraction less responsive then the 7600k.

I know AMD fans scream from the mountains about how much multi-threaded power the Ryzen six & eight cores have and the single threaded performance is "good enough" but you can make the same argument for an OC Intel's quad and/or i5-8400 with great single core performance and "good enough" multi-core performance for most people.
It's much easier to notice more cores at work provided you use something that utilizes them, compared to noticing single core performance.
Posted on Reply
#59
5150Joker
"Dante Uchiha said:
Yeah, In the real market the situation looks better.


Could you have picked a more slanted source? Even with mindfactory numbers AMD is still losing which is sad. I really don't understand this Ryzen hype, the single thread performance is still far behind Intel and the only thing it has going for it is "moar cores". Given the choice, I would pick Intel every time.
Posted on Reply
#60
lexluthermiester
"Fluffmeister said:
Do it!
I can name one and he freely admits it; @Knoxx29.
Posted on Reply
#61
Knoxx29
The Power Of Intel
Yeap, @lexluthermiester is right and people who knows me around here know how i think it about AMD, time ago i made a comment about AMD for which i got 5 warning points:D
Posted on Reply
#62
saikamaldoss
"las said:
I sell hardware b2b in Europe and we ship like 85/15 which is in line with Steam HW Survey
B2B is always intel because sales rep never mention about AMD and old folks there have no clue about new market.

Our Lenovo rep was not so happy when I asked for Ryzen builds. And the answer was it’s coming soon. I am pushing procurement to wait for Ryzen. Bottom line is once people start realizing AMD is back, B2B will switch. Because management and procurement teams are not tech people who log into tech news sites like TechPowerUp fudzilla
Posted on Reply
#63
las
"saikamaldoss said:
B2B is always intel because sales rep never mention about AMD and old folks there have no clue about new market.

Our Lenovo rep was not so happy when I asked for Ryzen builds. And the answer was it’s coming soon. I am pushing procurement to wait for Ryzen. Bottom line is once people start realizing AMD is back, B2B will switch. Because management and procurement teams are not tech people who log into tech news sites like TechPowerUp fudzilla
We sell to retailers..
Posted on Reply
#64
Hood
"saikamaldoss said:
B2B is always intel because sales rep never mention about AMD and old folks there have no clue about new market.

Our Lenovo rep was not so happy when I asked for Ryzen builds. And the answer was it’s coming soon. I am pushing procurement to wait for Ryzen. Bottom line is once people start realizing AMD is back, B2B will switch. Because management and procurement teams are not tech people who log into tech news sites like TechPowerUp fudzilla
Do you really think they don't know about Ryzen? They make better margins off Intel systems, and have fewer problems/customer complaints. AMD has come a long way, but the dynamic hasn't really changed, and it still makes more sense (and money) to push Intel and ignore AMD. Don't worry though, I'm sure Walmart will still be selling cheap AMD PCs when Ryzen APUs are flooding the budget market. At least they'll perform better than the anemic AMD CPUs and APUs of the past. Eventually AMD will get past the bargain-bin reputation they built for themselves, and deserve equal consideration, but they need to dominate at least one segment of the market, to the point of being the go-to for certain budget builds. Then they can expand their influence to other market segments, as their offerings become more compelling.
Posted on Reply
#65
saikamaldoss
I am talking about B2B in my company As i approve what our procurement team buys and you want me to buy from Walmart ?? I did not say I am buying a PC for my grandma.
Posted on Reply
#66
Hood
"saikamaldoss said:
I am talking about B2B in my company As i approve what our procurement team buys and you want me to buy from Walmart ?? I did not say I am buying a PC for my grandma.
I was talking about why OEMs like your Lenovo rep don't care about Ryzen. They make $ from volume sales and they make what sells, not what some "procurement team" wants in the smaller B2B market.
Posted on Reply
#67
saikamaldoss
"Hood said:
I was talking about why OEMs like your Lenovo rep don't care about Ryzen. They make $ from volume sales and they make what sells, not what some "procurement team" wants in the smaller B2B market.
Sorry I have to disagree. We have the power to buy what we want. We are already ordered 1800 of lanovo ideapad 720s. Waiting for 15inch and some mini desktops with 2700 ryzens. Corporate owns buying power and they decide what they want. We even have custom models specifications as per our requirements. This is part of our win10 migration. We are also planning for a hardware refresh and we are holding on for Ryzen models.
Posted on Reply
#68
Hood
"saikamaldoss said:
Sorry I have to disagree. We have the power to buy what we want. We are already ordered 1800 of lanovo ideapad 720s. Waiting for 15inch and some mini desktops with 2700 ryzens. Corporate owns buying power and they decide what they want. We even have custom models specifications as per our requirements. This is part of our win10 migration. We are also planning for a hardware refresh and we are holding on for Ryzen models.
I hope it all goes smoothly. What CPUs will you get, and if you don't mind, please explain why you chose them (to save money, need more cores, etc.). I like your attitude, you're pushing for changes in hardware platform and OS/software, with all the potential for problems involved, and you don't seem worried. Personally, I like Win10, and never had a problem with it, once I figured out where they were hiding all the settings. I never had a Ryzen system, so all I know is what I read, but I understand that the initial problems have all been worked out by now. Good luck, let us know how it works out.
Posted on Reply
#69
Mr B
I love my Ryzen chip.
Posted on Reply
#70
Knoxx29
The Power Of Intel
"Hood said:
please explain why you chose them (to save money, need more cores, etc.)
I can answer that.

To save money, that's why they are still in the market because their low prices otherwise they would be already extinct.
Posted on Reply
#71
John Naylor
I think there's other factors here.

a) With GFX card segment having been stagnant and high priced for so long, many people just held off doing new builds.

b) For those whose usages or leanings favor Intel, there has been no reason to upgrade ... Sandy Bbridge even is still a viable processor.

c) For those whose usages or leanings favor AMD, there is now significant reason to upgrade .

Right now to my eyes, not a lot of reason to upgrade anything ... but at this point ...

... For workstations, we still like / recommend Intel
... For gaming boxes, we still like / recommend Intel
... For boxes that need to do a significant amount (30% or more) of both, we like / recommend Ryzen
Posted on Reply
#72
lexluthermiester
"John Naylor said:
a) With GFX card segment having been stagnant and high priced for so long, many people just held off doing new builds.
Can't agree with that one. Offerings from both red and green camps have are greatly better than the previous gen offerings.
"John Naylor said:
b) For those whose usages or leanings favor Intel, there has been no reason to upgrade ... Sandy Bridge even is still a viable processor.
Agreed. Heck, even 1366 is still viable and competitive.
"John Naylor said:
c) For those whose usages or leanings favor AMD, there is now significant reason to upgrade .
Also agree. Ryzen has given AMD a new golden lease on life. There's just no reason to stay with older AMD platforms unless there is not need for a performance boost or a user can't afford the upgrade.
"John Naylor said:
... For workstations, we still like / recommend Intel
Oh this flawed idea.. Ryzen has thrown the literal wrench into Intel workstation machinery. Ryzen has made things very interesting and difficult for deciding on a platform. In raw IPC Intel still has an edge, though slight in many cases. Yet in multi-threaded use-case scenarios Ryzen is the current king in cost/performance ratio's making AMD's offerings very attractive, and in some cases preferred, for workstations. Very complicated, but AMD is keeping the choice easier by keeping prices very reasonable. They have a premium product and yet are not charging premium prices.
"John Naylor said:
... For gaming boxes, we still like / recommend Intel
For pure gaming only boxes, yes.
Posted on Reply
#73
bug
^^^ For workstations, Intel has ME. If sysadmins are taking advantage of that, they'll be hard to sway towards AMD. Just think of how many PCs are stuck with Windows because of AD :(
Posted on Reply
#74
lexluthermiester
"bug said:
^^^ For workstations, Intel has ME. If sysadmins are taking advantage of that, they'll be hard to sway towards AMD.
Not as useful as you might think and AMD has offerings of similar functionality.
Posted on Reply
#75
bug
"lexluthermiester said:
Not as useful as you might think and AMD has offerings of similar functionality.
Vendor lock-in extensions are rarely as useful as advertised ;) They're still pretty good at locking people in.
Posted on Reply
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