Monday, August 13th 2018

Cooler Master Announces the Wraith Ripper for 2nd Generation Threadripper

Cooler Master, a global leader in computer hardware and peripherals manufacturing, announces the Wraith Ripper, the official air cooler for the 2nd Gen AMD Ryzen Threadripper desktop processor, as part of an exclusive partnership with AMD. The Wraith Ripper is designed, specifically, to keep the 2nd Gen AMD Ryzen Threadripper cool under the most strenuous conditions and manage up to 250W TDP.
Rip Through the Heat with Seven Heatpipes and Dual Heatsinks
With content creators, developers and PC enthusiasts in mind, the Wraith Ripper is designed with dual tower heatsinks, a seven heatpipe array for advanced thermal conductivity and a large contact surface area optimized for the Ryzen Threadripper. Concealed under a specialized Wraith Armor, designed to help guide airflow, is a 120mm MasterAir Pro Servo fan. Mounted between the dual tower heatsinks, the MasterAir Pro Servo enables a push-pull configuration by pulling cool air though one heatsink and expelling through the other to maintain thermal integrity and maximum performance of the CPU.

The Easiest Installation on the TR4
The Wraith Ripper's mounting system is the most straightforward installation on the TR4 bracket. Four long screws run from the top of the cooler to the bottom, enabling users to easily install the Wraith Ripper by tightening the screws at the top instead of struggling to mount the cooler at the base. In addition to its easy mounting system, the Wraith Ripper provides ends users with 44mm of RAM clearance, eliminating compatibility issues with most mainstream memory modules.

Elegant Illumination and Design
The Wraith Ripper's sleek, black design is complimented by the simple dual Addressable RGB LED strips that highlight the cooler and frame the backlit ARGB AMD Ryzen Threadripper logo on the top. Users can customize the speed, color and lighting mode of each LED through the built-in lighting control. To achieve full lighting control, users will need to download the Wraith Ripper lighting software, available on the Cooler Master website.
Specifications:

Availability
The Wraith Ripper will be available for purchase at local resellers in Europe from 27th September 2018 for a suggested MSRP of €119.00. Price and availability may vary per region.
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26 Comments on Cooler Master Announces the Wraith Ripper for 2nd Generation Threadripper

#1
bug
Does anyone remember Pentium D? Does anyone remember it topped out at 130W?
Cooling these new 250W parts may not be that practical on air.
Posted on Reply
#2
dj-electric
bug
Does anyone remember Pentium D? Does anyone remember it topped out at 130W?
Cooling these new 250W parts may not be that practical on air.
Its all about surface and thermal transfer form the die forward, and TR has tons of it. From what I've seen on 16-24C parts, Wraith Ripper is a damn good cooler.
Posted on Reply
#3
IceShroom
Wraith Prism needs similar kind mounting system for AM4 socket.
Posted on Reply
#4
Chloe Price
bug
Does anyone remember Pentium D? Does anyone remember it topped out at 130W?
Cooling these new 250W parts may not be that practical on air.
And I still overclocked my D 805 & D 820 with that old-school thick Intel stock cooler.

But this looks like a stock cooler which I would use without a doubt. :D
Posted on Reply
#6
bug
dj-electric
Its all about surface and thermal transfer form the die forward, and TR has tons of it.
It's a little about the surface, but in the end it's mostly about the amount of heat and how much the heatsink can dissipate.
dj-electric
From what I've seen on 16-24C parts, Wraith Ripper is a damn good cooler.
Depends on what your idea of a good cooler is. Mine is something that is 500g or less. I wouldn't criticize a little more for so many threads, but this looks like a 2Kg part.
Chloe Price
And I still overclocked my D 805 & D 820 with that old-school thick Intel stock cooler.
I went the AthlonXP->Athlon64 route instead ;)
Posted on Reply
#7
Tomorrow
Im guessing TR4 socket has such a strong mounting that you can just screw in a 2KG part without backplates etc.
Now we need temp results and for some brave soul to mount it on other sockets (for science).
Posted on Reply
#8
bug
Tomorrow
Im guessing TR4 socket has such a strong mounting that you can just screw in a 2KG part without backplates etc.
Now we need temp results and for some brave soul to mount it on other sockets (for science).
You can use the right case and mount the motherboard horizontally. Still, you'll need to take care when moving it around (probably not that often).
Posted on Reply
#9
nemesis.ie
I don't believe this is anything like 2kg. The Scythe Ninja copper special edition is around the same size as this (and it does not have a fan space in the middle) and was 1kg (excluding the fan).

These are aluminium fins, so I would imagine it shouldn't be more than ~1kg including the fan, a good bit less than 2 anyway.
Posted on Reply
#10
INSTG8R
My Custom Title
It’s certainly handsome.
Posted on Reply
#11
Fouquin
bug
I wouldn't criticize a little more for so many threads, but this looks like a 2Kg part.
It's physically smaller than the NH-D15, which weighs 980g without fans (1320g with). I would guess that out of the box this cooler would be a little lighter, close to 950g. Though it's hard to know how much that LED plastic shroud adds, it could put it over 1kg.
Posted on Reply
#12
HTC
Fouquin
It's physically smaller than the NH-D15, which weighs 980g without fans (1320g with). I would guess that out of the box this cooler would be a little lighter, close to 950g. Though it's hard to know how much that LED plastic shroud adds, it could put it over 1kg.
I wouldn't be surprised it it were heavier, because you're comparing it to the wrong cooler.

This is the cooler you should be comparing it to, reason being the TR4-SP3's massive socket is far bigger then a "regular" socket.
Posted on Reply
#13
efikkan
I don't know if it's just me, but isn't €119 a little expensive for this air cooler?

bug
Cooling these new 250W parts may not be that practical on air.
Cooling 250W with an air cooler is not a problem. Coolers such as Noctua NH-U14S and Be quiet Dark Rock 4 Pro* can do that with decent noise levels. Those coolers use larger heat sinks and 140mm fans, so I assume this "smaller" Wraith Ripper compensate by increasing fan speed (and noise levels). These coolers with larger contact surface does in fact work very well.

Air cooling is certainly the right choice for HEDT systems, unless it's for extreme overclocking as a "sport". 250W is certainly not a problem to cool, graphics cards do that easily with much less optimal airflow. The larger challenge is having proper airflow in the case. Most people think a big AiO watercooling system solves that, but it only moves heat inside the case, and if you don't have a case to take advantage of it, using an AiO cooler will probably be less efficient.

*) Dark Rock Pro 4 should release a Threadripper version very soon.
Posted on Reply
#14
bug
1.6Kg. Apparently just enough to shame Cooler Master from listing it on the product page :D You'll find it if you download the PDF though.
But temps seem to be doing fine on air, 40-60C under load.
Posted on Reply
#15
mcraygsx
While RGB really does the job but how does it scale as compare to Noctua NH-U14S TR4.
Posted on Reply
#16
HTC
mcraygsx
While RGB really does the job but how does it scale as compare to Noctua NH-U14S TR4.
Would like to see a comparison of any and all air coolers currently available for TR4-SP3 socket: there shouldn't be that many, no?

Most reviews only show AIOs :(
Posted on Reply
#17
efikkan
HTC
Would like to see a comparison of any and all air coolers currently available for TR4-SP3 socket: there shouldn't be that many, no?

Most reviews only show AIOs :(
Not too many, but a few are listed here:
https://www.amd.com/en/thermal-solutions-threadripper
https://wccftech.com/amd-ryzen-threadripper-cooler-heatsink-solution-roundup/
(Most are AIOs)

Not only is it bad that most reviews use AIOs, they also conduct the testing in an open rig. Air coolers does in fact work better in a well ventilated case with good directional airflow.
Posted on Reply
#18
mcraygsx
HTC
Would like to see a comparison of any and all air coolers currently available for TR4-SP3 socket: there shouldn't be that many, no?

Most reviews only show AIOs :(
I am spoiled by NOCTUA NH-D14. Ran it without a Fan with 3770K, 4790K, 5930K, 6900K and currently with 7700K. That is one amazing cooler and still does the job without noise.
Posted on Reply
#19
HTC
mcraygsx
I am spoiled by NOCTUA NH-D14. Ran it without a Fan with 3770K, 4790K, 5930K, 6900K and currently with 7700K. That is one amazing cooler and still does the job without noise.
Somehow, i highly advise against doing that in any threadripper 2000 series chip ...
Posted on Reply
#20
mcraygsx
HTC
Somehow, i highly advise against doing that in any threadripper 2000 series chip ...
Hopefully my next upgrade will be my first every AMD product and hopefully it will be a TR. Thus I am keeping close eye on how this cooler will perform but I keep coming back to the fact that Noctua has done decent job while relying only on average system case fans. You are correct there is not a huge selection of TR coolers to choose from. My local MC store only carry Corsair HYDRO that is compatible with TR and I really dislike pump/fan noise.
Posted on Reply
#21
bug
HTC
Would like to see a comparison of any and all air coolers currently available for TR4-SP3 socket: there shouldn't be that many, no?

Most reviews only show AIOs :(
Ask and you shall receive: https://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=26693
Posted on Reply
#23
HTC
bug
Ask and you shall receive: https://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=26693
IIRC, the fans of the Noctua run @ a much slower speed VS the WraithRipper but it still ended just slightly behind WraithRipper's thermals: very impressive, IMO.

Thanks for sharing.
Posted on Reply
#24
xorbe
bug
Does anyone remember Pentium D? Does anyone remember it topped out at 130W?
Cooling these new 250W parts may not be that practical on air.
But only 62.5 watts per each die, with a massive lid. Imagine four Pentium D in one package, it's not even in the same ballpark.
Posted on Reply
#25
Chloe Price
bug
I went the AthlonXP->Athlon64 route instead ;)
Me too, just tested Pentium D before went to Core 2 Duo. :)
Posted on Reply
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