Tuesday, November 13th 2018

MSI GeForce RTX 2070 AERO ITX Makes Its Debut

MSI's most recent addition to their NVIDIA GeForce based line up has appeared. The newly minted RTX 2070 AERO ITX is as you may have guessed a graphics card that targets the mini-ITX market. It is currently the smallest RTX series graphics card to be spotted thus far, with it being perfect for this form factor as it lacks a few features seen on the higher end RTX 2080 and 2080 Ti that add complexity. Essentially the lack of NVlink on all RTX 2070 offerings allows for a simpler PCB design that is better suited for this design. There is also the fact anyone wanting SLI would not be looking at ITX focused cards anyway.

The other feature removed likely for cost savings is the VirtualLink (USB-C) connector that delivers power, video, and data for virtual reality headsets. While not entirely a deal breaker it still makes using it for a small form factor VR system a bit more difficult going forward. That said, considering the slow adoption of VR its removal is still a relatively safe bet for MSI for now. Taking a closer look at the packaging shows no indication of a pre-applied overclock, meaning MSI's RTX 2070 AERO ITX should come with NVIDIA reference clock speeds of 1410 MHz base / 1620 MHz boost on the core. The 8 GB of GDDR6 memory should have clocks of 1750 MHz (14000 MHz effective). As for the graphics card's TDP, it should also keep to the reference specification of 175-watts. Currently, pricing and availability are still unknown.
Source: Videocardz
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7 Comments on MSI GeForce RTX 2070 AERO ITX Makes Its Debut

#1
micropage7
Sometimes i think why they dont try daughter board and fill the empty space there without sacrifice the lenght and the features
Posted on Reply
#2
Assimilator
Jesus, I've seen this story repeated ad nauseam around the web and NOBODY has picked up on the fact that RTX 2070 doesn't have NVLink ANYWAY to begin with, so MSI can hardly remove something that was never there.

Basic fact checking, do any tech "journalists" do it?
Posted on Reply
#3
EntropyZ
micropage7 said:
Sometimes i think why they dont try daughter board and fill the empty space there without sacrifice the lenght and the features
Kind of like the old dual GPU cards did before they started putting the GPU's on one PCB with a PLX chip?
Posted on Reply
#4
Turmania
Gtx 1070 was around 150 watts, this baby around 175 watts.good to see a manufacturer thinking about small form factor cases.cooling should not be a problem.I want to see more dual slot cards that does not exceed 2 slots. Almost all mini it cases is 2 slot design without any or much improvement to accomadate a more then 2 slot designs...
Posted on Reply
#5
silentbogo
Assimilator said:
Jesus, I've seen this story repeated ad nauseam around the web and NOBODY has picked up on the fact that RTX 2070 doesn't have NVLink ANYWAY to begin with, so MSI can hardly remove something that was never there.
....and then wonder why people become critical and sceptical about all tech news :banghead:

Turmania said:
Gtx 1070 was around 150 watts, this baby around 175 watts
We had R9 Nano and even GTX1080 in this form-factor before (175W and 180W respectively). I'm sure the cooling system can handle it.
Posted on Reply
#6
lexluthermiester
Turmania said:
Gtx 1070 was around 150 watts, this baby around 175 watts.good to see a manufacturer thinking about small form factor cases.cooling should not be a problem.I want to see more dual slot cards that does not exceed 2 slots. Almost all mini it cases is 2 slot design without any or much improvement to accommodate a more then 2 slot designs...
Right. There's little point in making a shorter card if it can't fit in the system width limits. This card seems to fit the bill.
Posted on Reply