Monday, November 27th 2017

Samsung Launches The New 860 QVO SSD Starting At $149.99 For The 1 TB Model

Samsung Electronics today unveiled its new consumer solid state drive (SSD) lineup - the Samsung 860 QVO SSD - featuring up to four terabytes (TB) of storage capacity with exceptional speed and reliability. Built on the company's high-density 4-bit multi-level cell (MLC) NAND flash architecture, the 860 QVO makes terabyte capacities more accessible to the masses at approachable price points.

"Today's consumers are using, producing and storing more high-resolution files than ever, including 4K videos and graphics-intensive games, escalating demand for greater capacities and performance in storage devices," said Dr. Mike Mang, vice president of Brand Product Marketing, Memory Business at Samsung Electronics. "Samsung continues to lead the move toward multi-terabyte SSDs with the introduction of the Samsung 860 QVO, delivering fast performance, reliability and value to more consumers around the world."
Mainstream PC users handling large multimedia content often need to upgrade their PC's storage to improve everyday computing experience. Based on the commonly used SATA interface and 2.5-inch form factor, the 860 QVO fits perfectly in most standard laptops or desktops. Also, by offering both high capacity and performance in a single, affordable drive, the 860 QVO eliminates the need to use a combination of an SSD and an HDD for booting and storage.

Featuring sequential read and write speeds of up to 550 megabytes per second (MB/s) and 520 MB/s, respectively, the 860 QVO achieves the same level of performance as today's 3-bit MLC SSD, thanks to Samsung's latest 4-bit V-NAND and the proven MJX controller. The drive is also integrated with Intelligent TurboWrite technology, which helps to accelerate speeds while maintaining high performance for longer periods of time.

For optimal reliability, Samsung provides a total byte written based on a thorough analysis of consumers' SSD usage patterns: a three-year limited warranty or up to 1,440 terabytes written (TBW) for the 4TB version, and 720 TBW and 360 TBW for the 2TB and 1TB versions, respectively.

The 860 QVO will be available globally from December 2018, with a manufacturer's suggested retail price (MSRP) starting at $149.99 for the 1TB model. For more information, please visit samsung.com/ssd or samsungssd.com. Source: Samsung
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81 Comments on Samsung Launches The New 860 QVO SSD Starting At $149.99 For The 1 TB Model

#1
Wavetrex
Completely unimpressed.

I just bought Crucial MX500 1TB for 130 Eur a piece (while the Samsung 860 EVO were at 160 or so).

Quad-Level Cell SSD's need to be A LOT more cheaper to start to make sense, in this case, under 100 EUR ( or 100 USD ) for 1 TB.
Samsung's premiums no longer apply as the competition has caught up in performance (and surpassed them in some cases), for lower prices.

Sacrificing endurance so much for QLC should also come with a significant price drop.
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#2
bug
Mentioning MLC in this context is extremely deceptive. Just sayin'.
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#3
dj-electric
This thing needs to quickly shave 30-40$ off its pricing, and that's without any special deals
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#4
thekaidis
It'll probably sell if it hits the $99.99 mark street price. The MSRP of 860 Evo is $199 but it sells for <$130.
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#5
R0H1T
Wavetrex said:
Completely unimpressed.

I just bought Crucial MX500 1TB for 130 Eur a piece (while the Samsung 860 EVO were at 160 or so).

Quad-Level Cell SSD's need to be A LOT more cheaper to start to make sense, in this case, under 100 EUR ( or 100 USD ) for 1 TB.
Samsung's premiums no longer apply as the competition has caught up in performance (and surpassed them in some cases), for lower prices.

Sacrificing endurance so much for QLC should also come with a significant price drop.
This is their first ever QLC drive, at least in the retail space AFAIK. The price will come down eventually as they get NAND w/more layers & competitors flood this space with the same type of drives.
Also Samsung being the market leader commands a price premium, just like Apple/Intel/Nvidia in their respective segments. Don't expect Samsung drives to be cheap, except when they're on sale.
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#6
Ubersonic
R0H1T said:
Also Samsung being the market leader commands a price premium, just like Apple/Intel/Nvidia in their respective segments.
No, Samsung using decent NAND and controllers in their drives (like the market leader Intel) giving them better longevity/reliability than the likes of Sandisk/Kingston/Western Digital commands a price premium.

By going the budget route they lose that premium, the only advantage a Samsung budget drive has over any other is the prestige attached to the name from their other drives.
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#7
R0H1T
Ubersonic said:
No, Samsung using decent NAND and controllers in their drives (like the market leader Intel) giving them better longevity/reliability than the likes of Sandisk/Kingston/Western Digital commands a price premium.

By going the budget route they lose that premium, the only advantage a Samsung budget drive has over any other is the prestige attached to the name from their other drives.
Samsung as a brand name itself commands a premium, that's just how things work. Among the competitors you've listed ~ Sandisk/Toshiba (now WD) also Crucial (Micron) as well as Plextor/Liteon (SK Hynix) are just as good as Sammy in virtually every possible metric that you can think of, except mindshare.
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#10
Deeveo
Will be looking at the 4TB version if the actual retail price will be low enough compared to 860 EVO 4TB (around 850€ currently). Will make a nice drive for steam library. Not the drive you want if moving a lot of files, but for mostly static data should be excellent.
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#11
TheGuruStud
Wavetrex said:
Completely unimpressed.

I just bought Crucial MX500 1TB for 130 Eur a piece (while the Samsung 860 EVO were at 160 or so).

Quad-Level Cell SSD's need to be A LOT more cheaper to start to make sense, in this case, under 100 EUR ( or 100 USD ) for 1 TB.
Samsung's premiums no longer apply as the competition has caught up in performance (and surpassed them in some cases), for lower prices.

Sacrificing endurance so much for QLC should also come with a significant price drop.
860 evo is under 130 in US lol

The premium is long gone, it's just market dependant.
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#12
GeoKas
Does this thing worth the money instead of a RAID-0 array of 4x 4TB WD Blacks mechanical HDDs ?
(I am in the video editing business, I need fast but huge capacities)
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#13
megamanxtreme
It does ... good? Nope, going for the Crucial drive.

GeoKas said:
Does this thing worth the money instead of a RAID-0 array of 4x 4TB WD Blacks mechanical HDDs ?
(I am in the video editing business, I need fast but huge capacities)
Keep the H.D.D. for reliability, unless S.S.D.s are as reliable, nowadays.
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#14
R0H1T
GeoKas said:
Does this thing worth the money instead of a RAID-0 array of 4x 4TB WD Blacks mechanical HDDs ?
(I am in the video editing business, I need fast but huge capacities)
Sure, but not a big fan of RAID 0 myself having suffered a few catastrophic failures. What you should do is probably wait for the prices to drop, a new launch will see high(er) prices, you can expect the 4TB model to come down towards that $400 mark especially if/when competitors out their QLC drives.
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#15
kastriot
Samsung, send me email when it's 50$, no wait 25$.
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#16
Vario
I want a NVME, ideally 970 Evo or faster 1 TB equivalent for around $140, not this SATA old tech.
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#17
megamanxtreme
Vario said:
I want a NVME, ideally 970 Evo or faster 1 TB equivalent for around $140, not this SATA old tech.
Yeah, man, they are degrading. I would have hoped for S.L.C. drives to be the norm and affordable, by now, instead of these jokes.

Then again, typical users won't notice the performance if they aren't passing the 42 gigs.
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#18
Assimilator
And I was just talking about these this morning. Even if they don't hit $100/TB anytime soon, they'll pull down the prices of all other SSDs and that's great news for us. I just hope they price the 2TB lower than 2x 1TB models and the 4TB lower than 2x 2TB, even if only by a few dollars, in order to entice consumers to plump for the bigger capacity. I think Samsung just called time on spinning rust disks, BTW.
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#19
GeoKas
megamanxtreme said:


Keep the H.D.D. for reliability, unless S.S.D.s are as reliable, nowadays.
I don't care for reliability, everything is backed up.
So now?
Posted on Reply
#20
oxidized
Wavetrex said:
Completely unimpressed.

I just bought Crucial MX500 1TB for 130 Eur a piece (while the Samsung 860 EVO were at 160 or so).

Quad-Level Cell SSD's need to be A LOT more cheaper to start to make sense, in this case, under 100 EUR ( or 100 USD ) for 1 TB.
Samsung's premiums no longer apply as the competition has caught up in performance (and surpassed them in some cases), for lower prices.

Sacrificing endurance so much for QLC should also come with a significant price drop.
I see your point but samsung EVO ssds have 50% more TBW GB vs GB, so that higher price kinda makes sense.
R0H1T said:
Sandisk/Toshiba (now WD) also Crucial (Micron) as well as Plextor/Liteon (SK Hynix) are just as good as Sammy in virtually every possible metric that you can think of, except mindshare.
Ermh, no? Samsung SSDs are faster and more durable compared to those, and you can just go take a look at benchmarks and other various tests.
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#21
TheLostSwede
GeoKas said:
I don't care for reliability, everything is backed up.
So now?
It'll be much faster than mechanical drives, especially for video editing, even considering that this is a mediocre SSD for raw performance.
What you might not want, is an SSD that fails i the middle of a project though.
Then again, I guess you don't write 4TB a day? If you do, it would only last you about 360 days, assuming you got the 4TB drive. The spec is good for 0.3 drive writes per day apparently.
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#22
GeoKas
TheLostSwede said:
It'll be much faster than mechanical drives, especially for video editing, even considering that this is a mediocre SSD for raw performance.
I assume you compare a raid-0 of 4 HDDs to one single non-raid SSD , right?
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#23
TheLostSwede
GeoKas said:
I assume you compare a raid-0 of 4 HDDs to one single non-raid SSD , right?
Mechanical drives are slow for anything except sequential reads and writes. Obviously video is mostly sequential data, until you start working with multiple files, which is not something mechanical drives like, unless those files line up perfectly. Throw in some effects, audio, etc. and it's no longer such a sequential workload.
Obviously if you have a hardware RAID card with DRAM cache, then this will buffer some of this, but I guess that's not your case?
I'm sure you can max out the SATA interface with your RAID as well and I'm sure there will be use cases when you don't see a huge improvement, but keep in mind that on top of much faster access to files, you also get rid of the noise, the heat and the power draw of mechanical drives.
This is also assuming you don't fill the SSD to the brim and work at least to some degree within the SLC cache. One you're outside of the cache, the drive only does 160MB/s (assuming the 4TB drive), which isn't going to beat your RAID for sequential writes.
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#24
R0H1T
oxidized said:
I see your point but samsung EVO ssds have 50% more TBW GB vs GB, so that higher price kinda makes sense.


Ermh, no? Samsung SSDs are faster and more durable compared to those, and you can just go take a look at benchmarks and other various tests.
The difference is marginal, unless we're talking about NVMe SSDs & even then the high end products from the competition are real close to the best of Samsung. Endurance ~ that's a pissing contest & the drives will most likely be obsolete before they exceed their TBW ratings. Check some of the results on TPU or here ~ https://www.anandtech.com/Bench/SSD18
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#25
GeoKas
TheLostSwede said:
Mechanical drives are slow for anything except sequential reads and writes. Obviously video is mostly sequential data, until you start working with multiple files, which is not something mechanical drives like, unless those files line up perfectly. Throw in some effects, audio, etc. and it's no longer such a sequential workload.
Obviously if you have a hardware RAID card with DRAM cache, then this will buffer some of this, but I guess that's not your case?
I'm sure you can max out the SATA interface with your RAID as well and I'm sure there will be use cases when you don't see a huge improvement, but keep in mind that on top of much faster access to files, you also get rid of the noise, the heat and the power draw of mechanical drives.
This is also assuming you don't fill the SSD to the brim and work at least to some degree within the SLC cache.
Well speeds are ok (intel in-chip raid with over 300MB/s) but there is some unknown factor that doesn't let me work smoothly in 4k editing.
The rest system is decent (7700k+32gbRAM+gtx980ti)
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