Tuesday, June 25th 2019

GIGABYTE Launches X570 Aorus Master Motherboard

GIGABYTE today officially launched its latest addition to the Aorus series of motherboards, made for the new generation of Ryzen 3000 series processors. The "Master" as it is called, is an impressive feat of engineering designed to handle even the most power-hungry Ryzen CPUs like the 16 core Ryzen 9 AMD recently showcased.

For starters, the board is featuring twice the amount of copper wires usually needed to implement a PCIe connection, which means less information loss on PCB. It has a 14 direct phases of Infineon digital IR 3556 PowIRstage MOSFETs VRMs that are capable of delivering 50A each, which means that the VRM is capable of delivering up to 700A of current, providing additional headroom for CPU overclock. To handle the large amount of VRMs effectively, the board is equipped with beefy heatsinks and a heat pipe that has direct contact with VRMs. Sandwiches between the heatsink and the board is a new generation of thermal pads designed by LAIRD, with 1.5 mm thickness and 5 W/mK thermal conductivity.
Here are the specifications of X570 Master board:
  • Supports AMD 3rd Gen Ryzen / 2nd Gen Ryzen / 2nd Gen Ryzen with Radeon Vega Graphics/ Ryzen with Radeon Vega Graphics Processors
  • Dual Channel ECC/ Non-ECC Unbuffered DDR4, 4 DIMMs
  • Direct 14 Phases Infineon Digital VRM Solution with PowIRstage
  • Advanced Thermal Design with Fins-Array Heatsink and Direct Touch Heatpipe
  • Triple Ultra-Fast NVMe PCIe 4.0/3.0 x4 M.2 with Triple Thermal Guards
  • Intel WiFi 6 802.11ax 2T2R & BT 5
  • Rear 125dB SNR AMP-UP Audio with ALC1220-VB & ESS SABRE 9118 DAC with WIMA Audio Capacitors
  • Realtek 2.5 GbE + Intel Gigabit LAN with cFosSpeed
  • USB TurboCharger for Mobile Device Fast Charge Support
  • RGB FUSION 2.0 with Multi-Zone Addressable LED Light Show Design, Supports Addressable LED & RGB LED Strips
  • Smart Fan 5 Features Multiple Temperature Sensors, Hybrid Fan Headers with FAN STOP and Noise Detection
  • Front & Rear USB 3.2 Gen2 Type-C Headers
  • Integrated Base Plate & I/O Shield Armor
  • Q-Flash Plus Update BIOS Without Installing CPU, Memory and Graphics Card
For more information, please visit the Aorus website.
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29 Comments on GIGABYTE Launches X570 Aorus Master Motherboard

#1
Zareek
I was wondering what the price was until I noticed the 2.5Gb Ethernet was Realtek. Now it doesn't matter unless it is really cheap! I'm not sure why I care so much it has Intel Gbit and I don't have anything else multi-Gbit yet. Realtek Ethernet has just been so bad for so long, I guess it shakes my confidence in the quality of the rest of the board.
Posted on Reply
#2
HD64G
All good but why the 16 core CPU is the most power hungry having a 105W TDP which is the same as the 8 core one? Maybe you meant that the 16C can consume more when overclocked? If so, I will agree.
Posted on Reply
#3
kapone32
Zareek, post: 4069811, member: 187034"
I was wondering what the price was until I noticed the 2.5Gb Ethernet was Realtek. Now it doesn't matter unless it is really cheap! I'm not sure why I care so much it has Intel Gbit and I don't have anything else multi-Gbit yet. Realtek Ethernet has just been so bad for so long, I guess it shakes my confidence in the quality of the rest of the board.
The Realtak 2.5 is not bad at all. I have it on my board and it works great.
Posted on Reply
#4
bug
That's one sexy looking backplate. And they managed to not put a fan on the chipset.
That said, like @Zareek noted, it comes with Realtek LAN and I can spot some non-solid caps in one corner (probably for sound and other crap like that).
It will all come down to price, of course.
Posted on Reply
#5
Dammeron
bug, post: 4069815, member: 157434"
And they managed to not put a fan on the chipset.
And what do You think those stripe holes on top are for? Air intake. There's no way that little piece of crap would cool down X570 passively.
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#6
kapone32
I haven't trusted Gigabyte boards since I bit the bullet and tried the X470 Gaming 7 even with all of the bells and whistles the board gave me the dreaded 00 code after 2 months of ownership.
Posted on Reply
#7
jeremyshaw
HD64G, post: 4069812, member: 95052"
All good but why the 16 core CPU is the most power hungry having a 105W TDP which is the same as the 8 core one? Maybe you meant that the 16C can consume more when overclocked? If so, I will agree.
TDP hasn't really had a strong correlation to power consumption for a while. AMD and Intel have abandoned it in favor of TDP meaning something akin to "how much heatsink does one need to reach 'stock' performance?"

kapone32, post: 4069817, member: 181865"
I haven't trusted Gigabyte boards since I bit the bullet and tried the X470 Gaming 7 even with all of the bells and whistles the board gave me the dreaded 00 code after 2 months of ownership.
For me, it was finding out how bad the power delivery on the H110i board they had a while ago. Sure, "my fault" for choosing a cheap board, but I would expect it to be capable of holding a quad core at bone stock settings, without VRM throttling ever ~5 seconds. I never even knew this was a thing, until that board. Even with just a Celeron dual core, it would come within a hair of it's 86C VRM throttling point. Adding various types of VRM heatsinks did little to help. At least that board did bring me into the M.2 NVMe SSD era. But I'll never buy another Gigabyte board again. Never had that problem with low end ASUS, ASRock, and MSI boards, across Intel and AMD CPUs.
Posted on Reply
#8
Particle
Zareek, post: 4069811, member: 187034"
I was wondering what the price was until I noticed the 2.5Gb Ethernet was Realtek. Now it doesn't matter unless it is really cheap! I'm not sure why I care so much it has Intel Gbit and I don't have anything else multi-Gbit yet. Realtek Ethernet has just been so bad for so long, I guess it shakes my confidence in the quality of the rest of the board.
You could just add in your own Ethernet card. A gigabit Intel card costs like $10.

If you're using copper, you shouldn't be using onboard anyway. It's an invitation to buy a new motherboard if you ever get hit by a significant electrical storm. Add-in cards tend to take the hit and save the system unless it's a really-hard hit.
Posted on Reply
#9
bug
Dammeron, post: 4069816, member: 150201"
And what do You think those stripe holes on top are for? Air intake. There's no way that little piece of crap would cool down X570 passively.
Hm, having a fan under there and then leaving it with so small an air intake would be "uninspired".
Posted on Reply
#10
jeremyshaw
Particle, post: 4069820, member: 60447"
You could just add in your own Ethernet card. A gigabit Intel card costs like $10.

If you're using copper, you shouldn't be using onboard anyway. It's an invitation to buy a new motherboard if you ever get hit by a significant electrical storm. Add-in cards tend to take the hit and save the system unless it's a really-hard hit.
Well, technically Ethernet is supposed to be electrically isolated using transformers in the jack or the PHY. Not that a DC voltage spike couldn't jump across electrical insulation, but there is a bit more protection than the usual external connector.

But I agree. On a mATX/ATX or larger board, just get an add-in card. If it was mITX (or even some mATX), I could see the point w.r.t. onboard Ethernet (for a high end mITX board, I would absolutely demand it - TB3's P2P network mode has really opened my eyes to the benefits of a fast network connection).

I feel we are long past the point where 2.5G should be a baseline, and 1Gbe should be in the history books or cheap junk.
Posted on Reply
#12
Particle
jeremyshaw, post: 4069825, member: 92377"
Well, technically Ethernet is supposed to be electrically isolated using transformers in the jack or the PHY. Not that a DC voltage spike couldn't jump across electrical insulation, but there is a bit more protection than the usual external connector.

But I agree. On a mATX/ATX or larger board, just get an add-in card. If it was mITX (or even some mATX), I could see the point w.r.t. onboard Ethernet (for a high end mITX board, I would absolutely demand it - TB3's P2P network mode has really opened my eyes to the benefits of a fast network connection).

I feel we are long past the point where 2.5G should be a baseline, and 1Gbe should be in the history books or cheap junk.
I think we more or less agree. I moved to 10 GbE fiber years ago in my home.

As for the electrical isolation, the design basis for the transformers was to allow Ethernet to work between devices with ground offsets. The obvious use case where that has a potential is when runs go between buildings with different grounding points. If I recall correctly, it's only designed to deal with something like a 50 volt offset between endpoints though. It does help, but it's not bulletproof.
Posted on Reply
#13
bogami
Nice !I m interested in price. I've seen ( Due to the limitation of PC structure, the capacity of shadow memory is fixed. If the shadow memory is not enough, some of the RAID controllers will be inactive.) The question arises whether a RAID with three M2 is possible, of course, with four with one unit on PCiE slot ? My choice board , very possible ! ww.youtube.com/watch?v=Lz4_stcf__0 WACH THIS !
Posted on Reply
#14
kapone32
bogami, post: 4069836, member: 102090"
Nice !I m interested in price. I've seen ( Due to the limitation of PC structure, the capacity of shadow memory is fixed. If the shadow memory is not enough, some of the RAID controllers will be inactive.) The question arises whether a RAID with three M2 is possible, of course, with four with one unit on PCiE slot ? My choice board , very possible !
It should be doable. It works with X399. The Add in card might cause some headaches unless the 2nd and 3rd slot have 4x4x4x4 for PCI_E 3.0 because it would only works with PCI_E 4.0 drives on the first x16 slot. It would be interesting to see if the GPU plugged into the 8 or 4 slot would suffer any bandwidth issues though.
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#16
The Quim Reaper
kapone32, post: 4069817, member: 181865"
I haven't trusted Gigabyte boards since I bit the bullet and tried the X470 Gaming 7 even with all of the bells and whistles the board gave me the dreaded 00 code after 2 months of ownership.
You know, there is story like yours about EVERY single motherboard ever released....
Posted on Reply
#17
Zareek
kapone32, post: 4069814, member: 181865"
The Realtak 2.5 is not bad at all. I have it on my board and it works great.
It seems Realtek has been improving their Ethernet silicon for a while now, still now sure I'm ready to trust them. It took years for me to accept them for audio and that was mostly because finding an on-board made by someone else is almost impossible and Windows having proper support for real sound cards died a long time ago.

Particle, post: 4069820, member: 60447"
You could just add in your own Ethernet card. A gigabit Intel card costs like $10.

If you're using copper, you shouldn't be using onboard anyway. It's an invitation to buy a new motherboard if you ever get hit by a significant electrical storm. Add-in cards tend to take the hit and save the system unless it's a really-hard hit.
Yes, I could add a card but I'm guessing there is a price to be paid for that Realtek Ethernet. I don't want to pay for something I won't be using. I have never had a storm take out an on-board Ethernet controller or motherboard. My brother, who at the time I lived in the same apartment building as had an on-board Ethernet controller taken by a storm but the board was still usable. It was directly connected to his cable modem which is where the spike came in. Storm took the cable modem too but it was a leased one so the cable company replaced it.
Posted on Reply
#18
bonehead123
hummm, a nice looking board with a ton of features. Of course, being a new x570, it will be mega-expensive too but perhaps the retail prices will drop not too long after launch... fingers crossed :p

Is it just my imagination, or are we FINALLY getting mobo's without those draconian, should-have-been-eliminated-10 yrs-ago PS/2 ports...nah, say it aint so, hehehehe :roll:

Oh, and I REALLY like that marketing-hype BS description on the m.2 slots:
  • Triple Ultra-Fast NVMe PCIe 4.0/3.0 x4 M.2 with Triple Thermal Guards
As if we don't already know that pcie 4 doubles the bandwidth of pcie 3............
Posted on Reply
#19
kapone32
The Quim Reaper, post: 4069852, member: 116062"
You know, there is story like yours about EVERY single motherboard ever released....
Yes but Gigabyte by far has the worst record for me. There is only 1 Gigabyte board that I bought (970 Evo) that still works today. I have had the same experience with As Rock on an 890 board but I have not had this happen to me on any AM4 As rock boards (over 10 and counting). It did happen with 2 X370 Prime boards from Asus.
Posted on Reply
#20
JAB Creations
  • I like Gigabyte as a brand; AM3 790FX and AM3+ 990FX motherboards still going strong.
  • I'll never buy a motherboard with WIFI on it.
  • I'll never buy an AMD motherboard with Intel-anything on it.
  • While all bronze colored audio IO ports look nice I do prefer at least some small tint of color; yes there are label.
  • Built-in rear-IO panel is cool.
  • Only one USB 3.1 type C port?
  • Dual-LAN for the win! Granted LAN parties aren't as common any more though bridging dual-LAN ports was always a fun way when you ran out of switch ports.
  • Three M.2 ports is good. My next build will have a solo C:\ and RAID 1 D:\.
  • I'm looking for at least eight SATA ports on my AM4 build so I'll look at higher end boards.
  • Front USB 3.2 Type-C connectors for the win!
I'm looking forward to motherboard stability with RAM and faster supported RAM speeds. The upside of getting onboard a new socket the first day is the upgradeability (if you didn't cheap out on the motherboard) while the downside is the less than stable environment. July 7th can't come fast enough!
Posted on Reply
#21
kapone32
JAB Creations, post: 4069878, member: 157241"
  • I like Gigabyte as a brand; AM3 790FX and AM3+ 990FX motherboards still going strong.
  • I'll never buy a motherboard with WIFI on it.
  • I'll never buy an AMD motherboard with Intel-anything on it.
  • While all bronze colored audio IO ports look nice I do prefer at least some small tint of color; yes there are label.
  • Built-in rear-IO panel is cool.
  • Only one USB 3.1 type C port?
  • Dual-LAN for the win! Granted LAN parties aren't as common any more though bridging dual-LAN ports was always a fun way when you ran out of switch ports.
  • Three M.2 ports is good. My next build will have a solo C:\ and RAID 1 D:\.
  • I'm looking for at least eight SATA ports on my AM4 build so I'll look at higher end boards.
  • Front USB 3.2 Type-C connectors for the win!
I'm looking forward to motherboard stability with RAM and faster supported RAM speeds. The upside of getting onboard a new socket the first day is the upgradeability (if you didn't cheap out on the motherboard) while the downside is the less than stable environment. July 7th can't come fast enough!
YOu do realize most of these boards come with Wifi 6.
Posted on Reply
#22
Vayra86
bug, post: 4069823, member: 157434"
Hm, having a fan under there and then leaving it with so small an air intake would be "uninspired".
You do realize this is Gigabyte, yes? They are still finding out how to do GPU heatsinks in the right fin direction.

bonehead123, post: 4069866, member: 139670"
  • Triple Ultra-Fast NVMe PCIe 4.0/3.0 x4 M.2 with Triple Thermal Guards
As if we don't already know that pcie 4 doubles the bandwidth of pcie 3............
They could have added a few X's here and there to really convince us... :P
Posted on Reply
#23
Bones
Vayra86, post: 4069971, member: 152404"
You do realize this is Gigabyte, yes? They are still finding out how to do GPU heatsinks in the right fin direction.
They gotta get past the problem of making a non self-destructive BIOS first, then move onto the fans. :D
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#24
mashie
I'm probably doing something wrong but my Gigabyte workstation board has been rock stable for 4 years.
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#25
bonehead123
mashie, post: 4070326, member: 2165"
I'm probably doing something wrong but my Gigabyte workstation board has been rock stable for 4 years.
Mine is going on 3 yrs neveranottaproblemo, and I bought it USED, so it's probably close to 5 yo in reality
Posted on Reply
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