Monday, August 5th 2019

Cryorig Unveils the C7 G CPU Cooler with Graphene Coating

Cryorig launched its first new product in months after going MIA in the US market with imminent plans to return, the new C7 G CPU Cooler. The company had unveiled this cooler just ahead of this year's Computex. A variant of the C7 Cu all-copper, top-flow, low-profile air cooler, the C7 G features graphene coating on the copper fins and heat-pipes. This coating increases surface-area for heat dissipation at a microscopic level, and is similar in concept to the ceramic coating that CPU cooler manufacturers dabbled with in the past. The cooler can now handle thermal loads of up to 125 W, whereas the original C7 Cu was rated for up to 115 W.

With its fan in place, the C7 G has a height of 47 mm. It uses 57 copper fins stacked perpendicular to the plane of the motherboard, to which heat drawn from the base is conveyed by four 6 mm-thick copper heat-pipes that make direct contact with the CPU. The 92 mm fan takes in 4-pin PWM input, spins between 600 to 2,500 RPM, pushing up to 40.5 CFM of air with a noise output of up to 30 dBA. The cooler only supports mainstream-desktop CPU socket types, including AM4 and LGA115x. The company didn't reveal pricing.
Add your own comment

28 Comments on Cryorig Unveils the C7 G CPU Cooler with Graphene Coating

#1
Lionheart
Been eyeing this cooler for a while now, for it's size it looks pretty damn good especially if it can handle 125w tdp, only worried about the fan at this point. Will any TPU staff be reviewing this when it launches? If so greatly appreciate it if one of you's do. :toast:
Posted on Reply
#4
lynx29
I doubt it beats out a Noctua U12A (which even beats out 360mm AIO's according to LinusTechTips) which is $25 cheaper. But this would be good if you need small form factor I suppose.
Posted on Reply
#5
sam_86314
Nice when something can be functional and also look good. I love the matte black look the coating adds to the heatsink.
Posted on Reply
#6
sifu
lol had C7G sitting on my desk past month
tldr: its crap
Optimum Tech has a review too.
Posted on Reply
#7
londiste
Lionheart, post: 4092877, member: 52641"
Been eyeing this cooler for a while now, for it's size it looks pretty damn good especially if it can handle 125w tdp, only worried about the fan at this point. Will any TPU staff be reviewing this when it launches? If so greatly appreciate it if one of you's do. :toast:
It can't. You are looking at 65W TDP CPU at best (and real 65W, not 3600/3700X).
I have a C7 Cu and any time CPU reports load over ~70W, temperatures become unmanageable.
lynx29, post: 4092883, member: 153071"
I doubt it beats out a Noctua U12A (which even beats out 360mm AIO's according to LinusTechTips) which is $25 cheaper. But this would be good if you need small form factor I suppose.
<5cm height is a very specific SFF niche and C7 is a high-end player in there. I don't think you realize how diminutive C7 actually is. Comparison to U12A is random at best, U12A heatsink is literally almost 3 times the size:
C7: heatsink only - 97 x 97 x 32 mm = 301 cm^3 - with fan - 97 x 97 x 47 mm = 442 cm^3
U12A: heatsink only - 158 x 125 x 58 mm = 1145 cm^3 - with fans - 158 x 125 x 112 = 2212 cm^3
Posted on Reply
#8
lynx29
londiste, post: 4092890, member: 169790"
It can't. You are looking at 65W TDP CPU at best (and real 65W, not 3600/3700X).
I have a C7 Cu and any time CPU reports load over ~70W, temperatures become unmanageable.
<5cm height is a very specific SFF niche and C7 is a high-end player in there. I don't think you realize how diminutive C7 actually is. Comparison to U12A is random at best, U12A heatsink is literally almost 3 times the size:
C7: heatsink only - 97 x 97 x 32 mm = 301 cm^3 - with fan - 97 x 97 x 47 mm = 442 cm^3
U12A: heatsink only - 158 x 125 x 58 mm = 1145 cm^3 - with fans - 158 x 125 x 112 = 2212 cm^3
Yeah it was not a fair comparison. I think at $125 though I would just go with an AIO.
Posted on Reply
#9
londiste
There are now three C7s (well, 4 as there is an RGB fan variant of the normal C7), scroll down on the product page for specs:
C7 - http://www.cryorig.com/c7_us.php / C7 RGB - http://www.cryorig.com/c7rgb.php
C7 Cu - http://www.cryorig.com/c7cu.php
C7 G - http://www.cryorig.com/c7g.php

Cu has pure copper heatsink (a little over twice as heavy as the aluminum one) and G has graphene plating on top of that. Stated TDPs are 100W for normal, 115W for Cu and 125W for G. I would say these are all overstated. Cu has performance advantage over normal one but it is not too big. Buying G is more about looks than actual performance but I would really love to be proven wrong.

Cryorig's fan is not too good. A common mod is replacing the fan. Most often with Noctua A9x14 and if possible, not the retail one but the one included with NH L9a-AM4 or NH L9i due to higher speed spec (2500RPM for the one on these coolers vs 2200RPM for retail fan).

Looking at prices in Europe, C7 is 25€, C7 Cu is 60€ and C7 G is a little over 60€ (62.90€). With that price, it's pretty good.
Posted on Reply
#10
Nordic
If you can fit an aio, then I don't think this is the right cooler for the job. Isn't this cooler for a very specific niche of very small form factor cases?
Posted on Reply
#12
lynx29
Nordic, post: 4092898, member: 96457"
If you can fit an aio, then I don't think this is the right cooler for the job. Isn't this cooler for a very specific niche of very small form factor cases?
I'm pretty sure even a Corsair H60 fits in a Mini-ITX build, but I think I know what you mean, there are very small cases.
Posted on Reply
#13
lZKoce
I always wanted to try one of these. Used to have Noctua NH-L9i, really solidly build. I wasn't very happy with 92mm fan though. Not as quiet as they say, IMO.
Posted on Reply
#14
londiste
lZKoce, post: 4092917, member: 102554"
I always wanted to try one of these. Used to have Noctua NH-L9i, really solidly build. I wasn't very happy with 92mm fan though. Not as quiet as they say, IMO.
I have an NH-L9a-AM4 (heatsink is a bit larger than NH-L9i) as well as C7 Cu. Haven't tried them on the same CPU but 2400G that Noctua is on and 8400 that C7 Cu is on have roughly the same power consumption. They are about on par with Noctua being considerably quieter. Both are copper heatsinks with size and area giving some advantage to C7 Cu so it is likely down to Noctua's better fan.

Slim fans are tough to get quiet (or rather getting them to move enough air requires high RPM compared to normal size fans). Noctua's are definitely among the few best in this size.
Posted on Reply
#16
londiste
Crackong, post: 4092960, member: 185495"
Isn't worth 127 USD.
Where does the $125/$127 figure come from?
I can see on being sold in Europe for little over 60€.
Posted on Reply
#17
Crackong
londiste, post: 4092983, member: 169790"
Where does the $125/$127 figure come from?
I can see on being sold in Europe for little over 60€.
ebay link from #3
Posted on Reply
#18
Nordic
Some itx cases are comparatively big and would. Other cases are much smaller.
Posted on Reply
#19
Franzen4Real
Nordic, post: 4092898, member: 96457"
If you can fit an aio, then I don't think this is the right cooler for the job. Isn't this cooler for a very specific niche of very small form factor cases?
lynx29, post: 4092916, member: 153071"
I'm pretty sure even a Corsair H60 fits in a Mini-ITX build, but I think I know what you mean, there are very small cases.
This cooler is intended for builds such as the Dan Case where every cubic cm of space is at a premium. The only AIO available that would be an option in a case like the A4 is the 92mm AseTek, and that is with A LOT of effort and custom length cables. Like Nordic mentioned, if you are building in a case that allows an H60, this cooler (or its variants) should not even be considered.

edit: sorry, Londiste pretty much already covered this above...

londiste, post: 4092894, member: 169790"
There are now three C7s (well, 4 as there is an RGB fan variant of the normal C7), scroll down on the product page for specs:
C7 - http://www.cryorig.com/c7_us.php / C7 RGB - http://www.cryorig.com/c7rgb.php
C7 Cu - http://www.cryorig.com/c7cu.php
C7 G - http://www.cryorig.com/c7g.php

Cu has pure copper heatsink (a little over twice as heavy as the aluminum one) and G has graphene plating on top of that. Stated TDPs are 100W for normal, 115W for Cu and 125W for G. I would say these are all overstated. Cu has performance advantage over normal one but it is not too big. Buying G is more about looks than actual performance but I would really love to be proven wrong.
The Optimum Tech review showed that in real world tests the Cu and Graphene versions are a little better than the aluminum, but between the Cu and Graphene they were a tie. It ends up that you're paying extra to have a neat looking matte black cooler (though I still prefer the raw copper look).
Posted on Reply
#20
Mistral
Nice looks, but judging by the pictures this will probably get murdered by the Big Shuriken and the Choten...
Posted on Reply
#21
londiste
Mistral, post: 4093382, member: 49446"
Nice looks, but judging by the pictures this will probably get murdered by the Big Shuriken and the Choten...
Big Shuriken 2 is not better. Big Shuriken 3 is a couple mm higher even without the fan. Choten is in an entirely different size class.
Posted on Reply
#22
CheapMeat
Want. I like black more than the look of raw copper. Thinking about using it on a few 2U rack builds.


Glad to hear they haven't gone bust.
Posted on Reply
#25
John Naylor
Unless you have severe height restrictions, i can't see even looking at this thing. $125 ????

If you can fit 149mm tall, for less than half that you can do 13C better..... the coating is attarctive but i dodn't see it making a big dent in those 83C temps.
https://tpucdn.com/review/scythe-fuma/images/temp_oc_aida64.png

And , even w/ mini ITX case, a 200mm tall cooler or 280mm radiator or multiple 240s is not a problem.
https://www.newegg.com/black-red-phanteks-enthoo-evolv-itx-tempered-glass-mini-itx-tower/p/N82E16811854062
Posted on Reply
Add your own comment