Wednesday, August 21st 2019

MSI Unveils New Creator Laptops Powered by 10th Gen Intel "Comet Lake" Processors

Taking the lead in producing laptops for creators, MSI continues to expand its dream-weaver series, now unveiling a complete product line designed specifically for creatives and content creators. MSI presents the world's very first laptops equipped with the latest best-in-class processors; its newest technological innovation will make a grand debut with Intel at the IFA exhibition from September 6th to 11th. The industry pioneering Prestige 14 & 15 feature the most powerful 10th Gen Intel Core i7 processor and True Pixel display. A must-have product paired with top-performing technology that will undoubtedly fulfill and enhance the life's work of creators.

As creative devices and software continue to improve, heavy computing ability has become a crucial function for creators. MSI, always striving to create breakthrough technologies and achieve innovative excellence, has introduced the pioneering Prestige and Modern series. Outfitted with the latest processor, the Prestige series are the world's first laptops powered by a 10th Gen Intel 6-core CPU and deliver at least 50% faster performance for a more fluid creative workflow, especially during multi-threaded processing.
Fast data processing performance is among the top criteria that professional and amateur creators look for in today's market. With the new 10th Gen Intel Core i7 processor, Prestige's users can now simultaneously open and process multiple computer programs, enabling creators to use 2D or 3D software with ease, making these the most ideal laptops for creative individuals such as YouTubers, photographers, animators and composers.

Performance with editing software such as Photoshop is accelerated up to 40%, compared to its predecessor while using a certain filter.

While using Premiere, with the latest powerful NVIDIA GeForce GTX 16 Series graphics, the Prestige series gives an effortless rendering process and with 4K video previews, Prestige 15 can provide boost speeds up to four times faster.

Present reality! True Pixel display gives pixel-perfect experience.
To see is to believe! High color fidelity can help creators indulge in their artworks easily; and know how their artwork will appear to the audience. Designed for professionals, MSI's True Pixel display, which features a 4K UHD resolution, True Color calibration for more precise color, 100% AdobeRGB wide color gamut to better represent the full range of colors, as well as guarantee industry-leading Delta-E<2 color accuracy, achieving true-to-life color display. All True Pixel displays are also CalMAN verified for the most accurate and precise visual representation.

To complement True Pixel display, the thin bezel design gives around 90% screen-to-body-ratio, contributing to a more realistic visual feast and the immersive entertainment, all-available on both the Prestige 14 and 15.

Prestige Series, heavyweight performance, lightweight portability
Our latest light and efficient design gives Prestige users another added bonus for today's busy changing creating and working environment. All the latest technology fits perfectly in a slim and compact sandblasted aluminium chassis, the Prestige 14 and 15 incredibly weigh only 1.2kg and 1.6kg respectively.
To provide the best creating experience, MSI puts itself in the creator's shoes, taking the desires of users into account during the design process. The Prestige 14 and 15 are developed according to a precise ergonomic design, including an elevated keyboard and the 1.5mm longer key travel distance to provide better feedback. In addition to that, the screen can be laid to 180-degree flat for presenting works.

Cases come in a variety of color options to fit into the lifestyles of a wide range of individuals. Living up to its name, the Prestige series embodies the essence of the elite, and it is the result of meticulous design. The carbon grey chassis of Prestige 14 and 15 are festooned with stunning blue diamond-cut trimmings along the side, representing the spirit of minimalist creators while reflecting the competence of business users.

Prestige laptops, 16-hour battery life for unlimited productivity
Laptop users and creators are not merely attracted to computer processing power and screen size. "The laptop has a strong battery life" as touted by a graphic designer, what surprises users the most is the battery life of MSI's creation laptops! Aiming to help users create timeless moments, the Prestige series is a clear winner in the untethered creativity race. The new battery design of Prestige 15 allows up to an incredible 16 hours of battery life, while Prestige 14 also gives up to 10 hours, allowing users to indulge in non-stop productivity for an entire day without requiring a charger.

Prestige 14 and Prestige 15 both come with two Thunderbolt 3 ports, accelerated by the 10th Gen Intel core processor, enabling the most versatile port for fast data transfer. The Prestige series are also equipped with up to Wi-Fi 6, supporting 3 times faster wireless connectivity than the previous standard.

Ultra-light laptop, Modern 14 pursuits effortless mobility
For those who are in pursuit of a livelier lifestyle, the stylish Modern 14, which aims for effortless mobility, is the best choice. The 14-inch Modern 14 compact metallic chassis weighs only an astonishing 1.19kg, but is still able to offer the power and fully equipped input and output interface. Furthermore, The Modern 14 can also provide up to 10 hours of battery life. The amazingly long battery runtime lets users focus solely on their craft, undisturbed and uninterrupted.

Taking the lead in producing the latest, most powerful, functional and compact laptops in today's market, MSI Prestige and Modern series will definitely provide creators the best creating experiences.
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15 Comments on MSI Unveils New Creator Laptops Powered by 10th Gen Intel "Comet Lake" Processors

#2
notb
TheLostSwede, post: 4102054, member: 3382"
No Ethernet, no buy.
You'll have to get used to it. There are just not enough people using these ports to keep them in these slim devices.
USB modems cost $10-20.

Dropping mainstream VGA support was a much bigger blow. Offices and universities are still full of HDMI-VGA adapters which hardly ever work.
Posted on Reply
#3
Vayra86
TheLostSwede, post: 4102054, member: 3382"
No Ethernet, no buy.
This. Somehow HP managed to get their Ethernet port just fine in an ultrabook, so, the necessity of it being gone, and 'get used to it'... lol. NO.

I know everybody wants to be like Apple but that shit won't fly in the normal world. And if it does, -1 customer here. Its also great how they, at the same time, remove dedicated ports like these and ALSO slim down on the number of USB ports offered. Bottom line is you'll be having a very slim laptop with shit performance and then get to bring another carry bag for all your peripheral BS.

A case of taking things too far. Will be interesting to see how that works out. Also consider for a moment the security and stability problems of Wifi versus cable; or the high density of wifi connections that is fast becoming an issue.

notb, post: 4102124, member: 165619"
Dropping mainstream VGA support was a much bigger blow. Offices and universities are still full of HDMI-VGA adapters which hardly ever work.
Same thing really. Timing is a difficult one with these things. The DVI port on Nvidia cards, remember that one :D Same discussion. And we tend to perceive everything through our 1st world, state of the art glasses as well. Imagine less wealthy societies/countries where the cycle time for hardware iis much longer...
Posted on Reply
#5
TheLostSwede
notb, post: 4102124, member: 165619"
You'll have to get used to it. There are just not enough people using these ports to keep them in these slim devices.
USB modems cost $10-20.

Dropping mainstream VGA support was a much bigger blow. Offices and universities are still full of HDMI-VGA adapters which hardly ever work.
Modem? :p
Posted on Reply
#6
TheinsanegamerN
notb, post: 4102124, member: 165619"
You'll have to get used to it. There are just not enough people using these ports to keep them in these slim devices.
USB modems cost $10-20.

Dropping mainstream VGA support was a much bigger blow. Offices and universities are still full of HDMI-VGA adapters which hardly ever work.
You'll have to get used to it. There are just not enough people using these ports to keep them in these slim devices.
type C to VGA dongles cost $10-20.

Sucks being on the other end, doesnt it? There are ways of getting ethernet into a thin machine, and given that these types of computers are also restricting the number of USB ports, you cant just smugly say "just buy an adapter and stop whining" because where are you going to plug it in, along with your mouse, keyboard, flash drive, ece? You will wind up buying a dock just to get usable ports, and at that point the whole "thin and light" aspect gets completely thrown out of the window.

So instead of "getting used to it", we will continue to complain, because these machines are for a niche audience, one that can tell OEMs to stop making stupid decisions, and they will listen if enough people speak up.
Posted on Reply
#7
notb
TheinsanegamerN, post: 4102201, member: 127292"
You'll have to get used to it. There are just not enough people using these ports to keep them in these slim devices.
type C to VGA dongles cost $10-20.
I'm not the one complaining. I only said that more people miss VGA than Ethernet. I'm fine without both.
You will wind up buying a dock just to get usable ports, and at that point the whole "thin and light" aspect gets completely thrown out of the window.
True, I think getting a dock for a laptop is the only sensible choice today (when used on a desk: home or work).

For other situations the typical set of ports will be enough for most. I just use a single USB at work, because I didn't get a BT mouse. At home... 2-3 USB ports max. I use 3 USB-B on a desktop.
So instead of "getting used to it", we will continue to complain
Yeah... well... we all kind of noticed that complaining is your specialty. :-)
Posted on Reply
#8
bug
I find it interesting that Ethernet cables have been serving us well for over 40 years using just one connector, whereas USB, which was meant to be universal, went through a lot of connectors in a little over 20 years.
Posted on Reply
#9
TheinsanegamerN
bug, post: 4102537, member: 157434"
I find it interesting that Ethernet cables have been serving us well for over 40 years using just one connector, whereas USB, which was meant to be universal, went through a lot of connectors in a little over 20 years.
To be fair, it really didnt. USB A and B ports have been standard since USB 1.0, its only with the new generation that type C was introduced. Everything else has been a speed revision, no different then ethernet 10, 100, 1000, and 10000 Mbps.

You could say that mini and micro USB ports are also present, bringing the connection count to 5, but the counterpoint would be USB does a LOT more the ethernet does, and is used on a far wider number of device classes then ethernet is.
Posted on Reply
#10
bug
TheinsanegamerN, post: 4102569, member: 127292"
To be fair, it really didnt. USB A and B ports have been standard since USB 1.0, its only with the new generation that type C was introduced. Everything else has been a speed revision, no different then ethernet 10, 100, 1000, and 10000 Mbps.
You're forgetting the mini- and micro- variants ;)
Posted on Reply
#11
Vayra86
notb, post: 4102253, member: 165619"
Yeah... well... we all kind of noticed that complaining is your specialty. :)
We also noticed you have a knack for defending the marketing reality, despite practical considerations. Or, extrapolating your experience to 'this is fine' for everyone, so get used to it. Makes me wonder how much you really mean and what you're just parroting.

Current ultrabook; I have an actual USB C dock sitting right here, and the machine offers 3 regular USB ports for other stuff. I get power through the dock (note: a dock costing 120 bucks... that's an easy 10-15% on top of your laptop's price right there, just to compensate for missing ports), and it also does my display connection.

I could connect USB through the dock as well (two free ports, of which only one is a fullsize USB, the other is ...another USB C...). So, effectively, I could hook up a mouse or K/B through it... but its a bit of a shame the latency is horrible that way. Its like typing over a 32-50ms ping connection right now. The whole workspace feels like working in a browser.

I also have a wireless headset which is absolute necessity in the workplace, for calls, etc. Needs a dongle, which needs to be in the laptop. 2 ports left. Those two ports would then preferably be Mouse/KB so I can lose the major latency hit.

Now I need to charge my Iphone. I have to unplug one of the peripherals to do so.

At home, I don't have a dock, and then the real fun starts. And note: employer won't give out a dock outside the workplace. So it really is either carrying a dock and the power cable; and that dock is easily as thick as a laptop that can hold two usb ports on top of each other...; or its a constant switching of peripherals depending on what I want to do.

So yeah, I'll complain too.
Posted on Reply
#12
bug
@Vayra86 https://www.amazon.com/LYFNLOVE-Splitter-High-Speed-Individual-Switches/dp/B07F681S4Y/ref=sr_1_2_sspa?crid=2JXGZ5T5HKLI8&keywords=usb+splitter&qid=1566481207&s=gateway&sprefix=usb+spli%2Caps%2C337&sr=8-2-spons&psc=1&spLa=ZW5jcnlwdGVkUXVhbGlmaWVyPUEyVFJQRDBBWFFaQ1hQJmVuY3J5cHRlZElkPUEwMjQwMzg2M0pVRk5VU0tLNkVOOCZlbmNyeXB0ZWRBZElkPUEwOTMyNTg0V1c1MlFaTkdMT0M0JndpZGdldE5hbWU9c3BfYXRmJmFjdGlvbj1jbGlja1JlZGlyZWN0JmRvTm90TG9nQ2xpY2s9dHJ1ZQ==

But yeah, since the port is supposed to be universal, you'd better be getting a crapload of them in the first place.
Posted on Reply
#13
Vayra86
bug, post: 4102600, member: 157434"
@Vayra86 https://www.amazon.com/LYFNLOVE-Splitter-High-Speed-Individual-Switches/dp/B07F681S4Y/ref=sr_1_2_sspa?crid=2JXGZ5T5HKLI8&keywords=usb+splitter&qid=1566481207&s=gateway&sprefix=usb+spli,aps,337&sr=8-2-spons&psc=1&spLa=ZW5jcnlwdGVkUXVhbGlmaWVyPUEyVFJQRDBBWFFaQ1hQJmVuY3J5cHRlZElkPUEwMjQwMzg2M0pVRk5VU0tLNkVOOCZlbmNyeXB0ZWRBZElkPUEwOTMyNTg0V1c1MlFaTkdMT0M0JndpZGdldE5hbWU9c3BfYXRmJmFjdGlvbj1jbGlja1JlZGlyZWN0JmRvTm90TG9nQ2xpY2s9dHJ1ZQ==

But yeah, since the port is supposed to be universal, you'd better be getting a crapload of them in the first place.
Adapters work but the starting point here was 'I need my ultrabook as portable and thin as possible and what trade offs do you really want to make for that. We're now at a point where we carry more peripherals for barely noticeable reductions of thickness of a machine.

The irony just couldn't be greater and I don't see the benefit.

Also, this adapter doesn't do power, so I'm still carrying a dock to sort that out, or the whole power brick, and I'd also still suffer the thickness of a displayport or hdmi connector - the same height as a USB port, and remarkably lclose to an ethernet port's height.
Posted on Reply
#14
TheinsanegamerN
Vayra86, post: 4102584, member: 152404"
We also noticed you have a knack for defending the marketing reality, despite practical considerations. Or, extrapolating your experience to 'this is fine' for everyone, so get used to it. Makes me wonder how much you really mean and what you're just parroting.

Current ultrabook; I have an actual USB C dock sitting right here, and the machine offers 3 regular USB ports for other stuff. I get power through the dock (note: a dock costing 120 bucks... that's an easy 10-15% on top of your laptop's price right there, just to compensate for missing ports), and it also does my display connection.

I could connect USB through the dock as well (two free ports, of which only one is a fullsize USB, the other is ...another USB C...). So, effectively, I could hook up a mouse or K/B through it... but its a bit of a shame the latency is horrible that way. Its like typing over a 32-50ms ping connection right now. The whole workspace feels like working in a browser.

I also have a wireless headset which is absolute necessity in the workplace, for calls, etc. Needs a dongle, which needs to be in the laptop. 2 ports left. Those two ports would then preferably be Mouse/KB so I can lose the major latency hit.

Now I need to charge my Iphone. I have to unplug one of the peripherals to do so.

At home, I don't have a dock, and then the real fun starts. And note: employer won't give out a dock outside the workplace. So it really is either carrying a dock and the power cable; and that dock is easily as thick as a laptop that can hold two usb ports on top of each other...; or its a constant switching of peripherals depending on what I want to do.

So yeah, I'll complain too.
My favorite thing about docks is when you get really complicated setups. We have dell 7390 2 in 1 laptops and WD 15 docks ($200 a pop, YIKES). I've got 2 monitors, speakers, KB, mouse, external HDD, ethernet, and often a flash drive or 2 connected all at once. It's so much fun plugging the laptop in and waiting 2 minutes for windows to figure out WTF you just plugged in, where everything goes, and waiting to see if windows forgets one of the devices. Every so often the USB controller just forgets to exist and wont connect to things on the dock, so you start the rigmarole all over again.

then the dock only has certain ports. For dual monitors, I had to go and buy several adapters to get the video out connectors I actually needed, or had to use VGA for one monitor which looks awful over that dock. And you are not kidding about the KB latency. I dont remember our old laptops with port replicators ever having this kind of trouble. And the replicators were a LOT cheaper. God help you if you want TB3 connectivity yin your dock as well.

The whole point of thin and light machines is to be easy to move, but when you cant get anything accomplished without expensive docks and port replicators, it makes you ask what the point is? We can make machines thin enough to be easy to carry and still have multiple USB ports, ethernet, and type C, yet we hamper our machines to sell $200 docks that barely work.
Posted on Reply
#15
bug
Vayra86, post: 4102606, member: 152404"
Adapters work but the starting point here was 'I need my ultrabook as portable and thin as possible and what trade offs do you really want to make for that. We're now at a point where we carry more peripherals for barely noticeable reductions of thickness of a machine.

The irony just couldn't be greater and I don't see the benefit.

Also, this adapter doesn't do power, so I'm still carrying a dock to sort that out, or the whole power brick.
Well, in your particular case, you could keep a splitter at home and solve all your issues.
But yes, to me mobility and productivity never went hand in hand.
Posted on Reply
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