Monday, October 21st 2019

GIGABYTE Threadripper TRX40 AORUS Motherboard Teased

AMD is going to launch its premium HEDT Threadripper CPUs, based on 7 nm manufacturing process, as soon as November 5th arrives. To prepare for the launch, manufacturers like GIGABYTE have been working hard to bring new CPUs to life, by integrating AMD's new chipsets into the new motherboard models. Dubbed "Castle Peak" and "Sharkstooth", the two new CPU variants will be accompanied by TRX40, TRX80 and WRX80 chipsets, each enabling additional features.

We now got a hold of the first picture of what appears to be GIGABYTE's AORUS motherboard based on TRX40 chipset. Coming in with the E-ATX form factor, this motherboard is similar in size with the previous X399 AORUS Xtreme model. It features four PCIe 4.0 x16 slots and eight slots that support four-channel DDR4 memory, so it is likely that TRX40 chipset is meant only for such configuration, with TRX80 and WRX80 chipsets being reserved for eight-channel memory configurations. Another thing to note is the presence of chipset fan, indicating that the TDP of these chipsets is high and it needs to be actively cooled in normal use cases. If you remember, plenty of X570 boards have a fan on chipset as well due to their TDP.
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25 Comments on GIGABYTE Threadripper TRX40 AORUS Motherboard Teased

#1
eidairaman1
The Exiled Airman
Hopefully they get the bios code right...
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#2
aredanecyfna
Looks like another AMD-inhouse chipset seeing active cooling again...
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#3
ZoneDymo
That 6pin at the bottom though
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#4
TheLostSwede
ZoneDymo
That 6pin at the bottom though
Plenty of boards have those, for extra power to graphics cards when overclocking. Most people will never need to use it.

aredanecyfna
Looks like another AMD-inhouse chipset seeing active cooling again...
What exactly were you expecting?
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#5
dicktracy
aredanecyfna
Looks like another AMD-inhouse chipset seeing active cooling again...
Another reason why I’ll wait for Zen3 or Zen4. Say no to loud chipset fans!
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#6
TheLostSwede
dicktracy
Another reason why I’ll wait for Zen3 or Zen4. Say no to loud chipset fans!
Loud? You got any proof of that? I can't hear mine at all.
Sorry, but if you're going to make an unsubstantiated statement like that, you better be able to back it up with some facts.
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#7
Deathy
dicktracy
Another reason why I’ll wait for Zen3 or Zen4. Say no to loud chipset fans!
Temperature controlled chipset fan on a X570 here (2200rpm). It is not louder than any of the 120mm fans I have (500 to 800 rpm).
Posted on Reply
#8
ZoneDymo
TheLostSwede
Plenty of boards have those, for extra power to graphics cards when overclocking. Most people will never need to use it.
yeah figured as much, still though, dont quite get it.
I mean PCI gives 75 watts right? and this 6 pin can add more power to that? and the card can then also actually take more then that 75 watts from the pci slot even though that would be operating out of spec?
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#9
TheLostSwede
ZoneDymo
yeah figured as much, still though, dont quite get it.
I mean PCI gives 75 watts right? and this 6 pin can add more power to that? and the card can then also actually take more then that 75 watts from the pci slot even though that would be operating out of spec?
Actually, any graphics card with two 8-pin connectors are "out of spec" so go figure...
This is what EVGA's manual says about their 6-pin connector on their X299 boards.
Supplemental PCIe 6-pin Power Connector. There is a 6-pin PCIe connector at the bottom of the motherboard (See Page 50 for more specifics to the connector itself, and associated wiring/pinouts). This connector provides dedicated power to the PCIe x16 slots, augmenting the +12V power provided by the 24-pin and the GPU directly. This is optional for a single card solution, but is recommended for SLI, CFX, and dual-processor video cards.
My guess is that it simply offloads the motherboard a bit by providing another power input for the PCIe slots when there's a heavy power load on the PCIe slots, i.e. when running multiple GPUs. Obviously, this might vary between board makers.
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#10
EarthDog
Typically any additional power on the board in that 6-pin pcie form factor is for GPUs however it's for MULTIPLE GPUs and not for overclocking.

Those who are saying x570 chipset fan is loud should be sure the bios is updated. I've reviewed several and iirc, only the asrock board could I hear the fan after boot.
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#11
Crackong
ZoneDymo
yeah figured as much, still though, dont quite get it.
I mean PCI gives 75 watts right? and this 6 pin can add more power to that? and the card can then also actually take more then that 75 watts from the pci slot even though that would be operating out of spec?
Cause all of your PCI-E 75W are coming from the Mother Board 24-pin
That 6 pin is to prevent the Mother Board 24-pin getting overloaded in multi-GPU setup, or by something like Rx480 or GTX780 which had known issues of overloading the PCI-E slot.
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#12
DeathtoGnomes
So the TRX80 replaces the TRS80, man its been a long time coming. :rolleyes: ;)
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#14
MEC-777
To Gigabyte and other hardware manufacturers: Can you please stop putting "gamer" phrases and slogans on your products? Thanks.
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#15
TheMadDutchDude
Oh joy... the “OMGEE it has a FAN!?!?” people are out in their droves again. Clearly haven’t a single clue nor have they used one. I can’t hear mine over 400 RPM Noctua fans, and that’s with it at 2700 RPM.

So bored of this foolishness.
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#16
EarthDog
TheMadDutchDude
Oh joy... the “OMGEE it has a FAN!?!?” people are out in their droves again. Clearly haven’t a single clue nor have they used one. I can’t hear mine over 400 RPM Noctua fans, and that’s with it at 2700 RPM.

So bored of this ignorance.
FTFY... :p
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#17
claster17
I could clearly hear the fan of my X570 Master because my system runs passive. Thankfully it never turns on.
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#18
IceShroom
kapone32
ARGB for workstation board?
MB vendors thinks people who will use those board likes ARGB thats why ARGB on workstation board. In few years we will see ARGB on server too.
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#20
ZoneDymo
TheLostSwede
Actually, any graphics card with two 8-pin connectors are "out of spec" so go figure...
This is what EVGA's manual says about their 6-pin connector on their X299 boards.

My guess is that it simply offloads the motherboard a bit by providing another power input for the PCIe slots when there's a heavy power load on the PCIe slots, i.e. when running multiple GPUs. Obviously, this might vary between board makers.
ah ok, that makes sense, less strain on the motherboard this way.
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#21
dicktracy
kapone32
ARGB for workstation board?
This is because Threadripper is HEDT. It's a different market than a pure workstation platform like EPYC.
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#22
Candor
ZoneDymo
That 6pin at the bottom though
I think the text next to this 6-pin says "USB TurboCharger". They have this on their new X299X AORUS Xtreme Waterforce Motherboard.

"USB TurboCharger for Mobile Device Fast Charge Support ".
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#23
Camm
Pretty nice looking board, although the ports on the side might be problematic for me. My FT fits CEB boards and thus most eatx) boards just fine, but with the plugs sideways, that might be an issue.
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#24
Mamya3084
kapone32
ARGB for workstation board?
My gigabyte x399 borad is apparently a "gaming" motherboard. Good thing it's easy to turn off.
The RGB ram is another matter. They should have a bios option to turn it off.
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#25
HwGeek

Don't you think is very interesting that they choose to show the terminator duplicating? ;-)
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