Monday, December 16th 2019

Intel CPU Based on New Architecture Leaks

Today Intel's CPU based on yet unannounced architecture got revealed in the SiSoft benchmark database. Featuring six cores and twelve threads running at 3 GHz, it appears like a regular 14 nm CPU that's already available, however, when digging through the details, many things are revealed. The newly submitted CPU has a different L2 cache configuration from previous CPU offerings, with this chip featuring 1.25 MB of L2 cache per core, it is unlike anything else Intel currently offers. Ice Lake mobile chips feature 512 KB, while the highest amount of L2 cache is currently present on i9-10980XE, which features 1 MB of L2.

It is unknown where this CPU fits in the whole 14/10 nm lineup, as we don't know if this is an iteration of 10 nm Tiger Lake or the rumored 14 nm Rocket Lake CPU. All we know is that this CPU features new architecture compared to Skylake iterations that are currently being used, judging by L2 cache bump, which usually happens on new architectures. The platform used for benchmarking this CPU was SuperMicro X12DAi-N SMC X12 dual-socket motherboard, which featured two of these new CPUs for a total of 12 cores and 24 threads.
Source: Tom's Hardware
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19 Comments on Intel CPU Based on New Architecture Leaks

#2
silentbogo
Last month there was another "Leak" with a 14-core Intel part, same cache config, and similar x12dpi-n board (2S LGA4189?).
Basically, another 14nm[add some pluses here] part for multi-socket servers, which on Intel's slides appeared as Cooper Lake SP.
Scheduled for release Q1 2020, I think.
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#5
Crackong
Vayra86


Nuff said.
NEXT
Nope just Nope :|
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#6
ixi
And I'm still waiting for 3950x to popup in retail stores in my country...
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#7
Dave65
Try harder, Intel!
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#8
medi01
AleksandarK
...it appears like a regular 14 nm CPU that's already available, however...
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#9
freeagent
Uh oh those AMD guys are getting nervous :confused:

Could it be another Conroe?

Probably not..
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#10
TheMadDutchDude
New architecture, new vulnerabilities to be discovered and exploited.

Intel is such a gigantic snooze-fest and has been for years.
Posted on Reply
#11
efikkan
silentbogo
Last month there was another "Leak" with a 14-core Intel part, same cache config, and similar x12dpi-n board (2S LGA4189?).
Basically, another 14nm[add some pluses here] part for multi-socket servers, which on Intel's slides appeared as Cooper Lake SP.
Scheduled for release Q1 2020, I think.
I do believe Cooper Lake-SP is Skylake based, and will not have 1.25 MB L2 and 1.5 MB L3 per core.
This cache configuration would very likely indicate it's Sunny Cove or Willow Cove based.
Vayra86


Nuff said.
NEXT
You should know better.
If genuine, a dual CPU configuration would indicate Xeon SP, which are energy optimized, not performance optimized, so is not intended to compete with your typical i7/i9 or Ryzen 7/9 desktop CPUs in performance per core.
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#12
Vayra86
efikkan
I do believe Cooper Lake-SP is Skylake based, and will not have 1.25 MB L2 and 1.5 MB L3 per core.
This cache configuration would very likely indicate it's Sunny Cove or Willow Cove based.


You should know better.
If genuine, a dual CPU configuration would indicate Xeon SP, which are energy optimized, not performance optimized, so is not intended to compete with your typical i7/i9 or Ryzen 7/9 desktop CPUs in performance per core.
It was mostly a joke, but even so, selling a new efficiency optimized 14nm CPU... the comment stands, there is nothing to see here and a quarter meg of cache wont change that a lot. It just yet another press release and yet another 14nm revamp. Yawn
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#13
efikkan
Vayra86
It was mostly a joke, but even so, selling a new efficiency optimized 14nm CPU... the comment stands, there is nothing to see here and a quarter meg of cache wont change that a lot. It just yet another press release and yet another 14nm revamp. Yawn
Precisely what points to this being a 14nm CPU? I'm not saying it isn't, but I think it's unfair to jump to such conclusions without at least some kind of substance, also it appears to be Sunny Cove based.
This being a dual socket CPU eliminates the possibility of this being a Tiger Lake (-S) or "Rocket Lake-S", as those dies will not support multi-socket configurations. Dual socket support is limited to Xeon scalable.
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#14
Vayra86
efikkan
Precisely what points to this being a 14nm CPU? I'm not saying it isn't, but I think it's unfair to jump to such conclusions without at least some kind of substance, also it appears to be Sunny Cove based.
This being a dual socket CPU eliminates the possibility of this being a Tiger Lake (-S) or "Rocket Lake-S", as those dies will not support multi-socket configurations. Dual socket support is limited to Xeon scalable.
We will see... how many press releases on Intel now this week? Its the same shit every time: something new is coming. Meanwhile the only 10nm product is barely available and pretty pointless in the grand scheme of things.

Unless we see a big leap in some way, Intel has nothing. Im not seeing those leaps here.
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#15
efikkan
Vayra86
We will see... how many press releases on Intel now this week? Its the same shit every time: something new is coming.
So what? Isn't that a good thing?
AMD does the same thing, well except for the extreme hype train of course.
Vayra86
Meanwhile the only 10nm product is barely available and pretty pointless in the grand scheme of things.
Second generation 10nm will reach much wider deployment and production volume than the first generation. Unless you have actually seen it, you really can't assess it yet. Don't forget that 14nm were terrible in the beginning, 14nm+ were okay, 14nm++ excellent.
Vayra86
Unless we see a big leap in some way, Intel has nothing. Im not seeing those leaps here.
You said "we will see", and yet you show some prejudgement here by claiming Intel has nothing ;)
Sunny Cove is beyond anything anything else on the market, so towards the end of 2020 we should see some exciting products from both camps. This will be fun times ;)
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#16
Vayra86
efikkan
So what? Isn't that a good thing?
AMD does the same thing, well except for the extreme hype train of course.


Second generation 10nm will reach much wider deployment and production volume than the first generation. Unless you have actually seen it, you really can't assess it yet. Don't forget that 14nm were terrible in the beginning, 14nm+ were okay, 14nm++ excellent.


You said "we will see", and yet you show some prejudgement here by claiming Intel has nothing ;)
Sunny Cove is beyond anything anything else on the market, so towards the end of 2020 we should see some exciting products from both camps. This will be fun times ;)
Come on, do we really need to go over a recent history together? We both know Intel is grasping at straws to somehow sell themselves as still relevant. 10nm was 'on track' for many years now, yet all we see is supply issues with 14nm CPUs and no 10nm CPU in sight really. There is no tangible product there, and even if its there, there is no volume production in any useful sense. We do get adapted roadmaps and completely nonsensical ones, whatever floats the marketing boat that particular week. The recent 'return to tick/tock' cadence was good fun!

So what, even IF they get a dual socket 10nm going... it still doesn't bring us anything. They've managed to find a use for a low power optimized node, because that is all we've seen so far, but who is really waiting for that baby step when 7nm is already in volume production and offering 1. EUV progress (cheaper dies higher yields), 2. both high performance and low power options and 3. actually does have performance to offer beyond what 14nm is capable of.

This race has already been run even if Intel brings us 10nm. That is why I pasted the performance metric there. Nobody is waiting for average performance revamped once more, and even on 10nm its too late to the party, while on 14nm its complete and utter nonsense.

Is this supported by hard fact? Of course not. This is crystal ball material... do come back to revisit this topic and see how it turned out I'd say :)
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#17
kapone32
Does Intel not realize how bad they look to us? There have been so many paper releases, to top it off over the past few years we have had nothing but meh releases. It also seems every few months there is a new vulnerability. There is a review of the 10990K (I think ) on Gamers Nexus and that for me is one of the most boring CPU releases this year. What I absolutely love though is how the 10980XE is 1/3 the price of the 9980XE but newer (well same boost clock but more cache). I would honestly say that the only viable chipset Intel currently has is LGA 2066.
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#18
Xx Tek Tip xX
kapone32
There is a review of the 10990K (I think ) on Gamers Nexus and that for me is one of the most boring CPU releases this year.
It was the 10900X.
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#19
kapone32
Xx Tek Tip xX
It was the 10900X.
Thanks the model numbers are uber confusing these days.
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