Friday, January 3rd 2020

NVIDIA's Next-Generation Ampere GPUs to be 50% Faster than Turing at Half the Power

As we approach the release of NVIDIA's Ampere GPUs, which are rumored to launch in the second half of this year, more rumors and information about the upcoming graphics cards are appearing. Today, according to the latest report made by Taipei Times, NVIDIA's next-generation of graphics cards based on "Ampere" architecture is rumored to have as much as 50% performance uplift compared to the previous generations of Turing GPUs, while using having half the power consumption.

Built using Samsung's 7 nm manufacturing node, Ampere is poised to be the new king among all future GPUs. The rumored 50% performance increase is not impossible, due to features and improvements that the new 7 nm manufacturing node brings. If utilizing the density alone, NVIDIA can extract at least 50% extra performance that is due to the use of a smaller node. However, performance should increase even further because Ampere will bring new architecture as well. Combining a new manufacturing node and new microarchitecture, Ampere will reduce power consumption in half, making for a very efficient GPU solution. We still don't know if the performance will increase mostly for ray tracing applications, or will NVIDIA put the focus on general graphics performance.
Source: Taipei Times
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186 Comments on NVIDIA's Next-Generation Ampere GPUs to be 50% Faster than Turing at Half the Power

#1
HwGeek
I bet that the "50% uplift" is in RTX ON performance while non RTX performance will remain the same in each segment.
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#2
s3thra
Wow. That’s like the performance uplift between generations in the old days. Though yes, this could just be for ray tracing.
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#3
ZoneDymo
HwGeek
I bet that the "50% uplift" is in RTX ON performance while non RTX performance will remain the same in each segment.
^ this, I was just going to say the same thing.

Also, if any of this is true, Im not expecting prices to return to normal any time soon....in fact it will probably just get worse.
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#4
R0H1T
Yes & pigs will also fly when that happens :rolleyes:

Reminds me of Intel's PR these days with multiple ***
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#5
Hyderz
cant wait to see the benchmarks
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#6
Wyverex
Benchmarks or didn't happen :pimp:

Would be great if there's truth to this though
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#7
Calmmo
This is talking about ampere, will nvidia even make gaming GPUs from that or are they again going to hold off for a year then release a cut down variant under a different name? AMD have nothing to show still, officially, so why would they unless the new node allows for a significant reduction in costs. If this is an indication of anything.. this is probably about their new titan 3000$ card..
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#8
The Quim Reaper
So that means I'll be able to play 'Control' at 4K, RTX High at 23fps instead of 15!!

..Amazeballs.

That will be so worth spending another $1000+ for.
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#9
FARGOUS
hi guys
i have my MSI GTX 970 Twin Frozer since 2014 , is very very good graphic card on my Samsung CF791 4k monitor ultra wide 21:9 .

i wait so much time to can buy this RTX 3080 because the RTX 2080 is so expensive for 4k performance / price

i hope the RTX on in 4k are very good in this new next gen NVIDIA .
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#10
Vayra86
HwGeek
I bet that the "50% uplift" is in RTX ON performance while non RTX performance will remain the same in each segment.
That kinda means the better half of us will stick to the rather cheap discounted Turing Supers, that offered good perf/dollar, or Navi. If they don't push the upper mid range to 2080 S levels, this thing is dead in the water and RT adoption will slow to a crawl.

Keep in mind mainstream res. 1080p. By an immense margin. People have no urge, Pascal's midrange can push most of the games just fine, still. That's a 2016 release..

So no, I think we'll see a jump. 50%, not so sure, indeed. But 25-30% (as usual) definitely.

FARGOUS
hi guys
i have my MSI GTX 970 Twin Frozer since 2014 , is very very good graphic card on my Samsung CF791 4k monitor ultra wide 21:9 .

i wait so much time to can buy this RTX 3080 because the RTX 2080 is so expensive for 4k performance / price

i hope the RTX on in 4k are very good in this new next gen NVIDIA .
4K will always be a tough one. Especially when RT gets bigger. I'd accept 1080p on that panel for the next half decade if I were you ;)

4K and ultrawide though. It doesn't exist.
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#11
lynx29
Good thing Navi 2 is coming, I no longer have to bow down to Nvidia. I don't intend to do 4k Gaming, don't see the point, so Navi 2 will do me just fine wherever it lands performance wise.
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#12
TheGuruStud
Remember that turding vs Pascal chart? :roll:
Nvidia math is worse than Intel math.
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#13
HTC
Something doesn't sound right.

When moving to a smaller node, you either get X% higher performance @ the same power or same performance using Y% less power, but not both.
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#14
FARGOUS
Vayra86
That kinda means the better half of us will stick to the rather cheap discounted Turing Supers, that offered good perf/dollar, or Navi. If they don't push the upper mid range to 2080 S levels, this thing is dead in the water and RT adoption will slow to a crawl.

Keep in mind mainstream res. 1080p. By an immense margin. People have no urge, Pascal's midrange can push most of the games just fine, still. That's a 2016 release..

So no, I think we'll see a jump. 50%, not so sure, indeed. But 25-30% (as usual) definitely.



4K will always be a tough one. Especially when RT gets bigger. I'd accept 1080p on that panel for the next half decade if I were you ;)

4K and ultrawide though. It doesn't exist.
it's 3440x1440 not 3840 x 2160
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#15
Vayra86
FARGOUS
it's 3440x1440 not 3840 x 2160
A lot more doable, that.
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#16
Italia1
Mmmh... After years with Nvidia(FX 5950, 6800ultra, 7950gx2), then years with Amd (1950xt - until now with Vega 64 liquid)... I'm waiting for best video card this summer. Will be Navi or Ampere ? I need a serious upgrade
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#17
Recus
TheGuruStud
Remember that turding vs Pascal chart? :roll:
Nvidia math is worse than Intel math.
What chart?

HTC
Something doesn't sound right.

When moving to a smaller node, you either get X% higher performance @ the same power or same performance using Y% less power, but not both.
Maxwell 28nm to Pascal 16nm. Pascal got performance and efficiency.
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#18
ZoneDymo
Italia1
Mmmh... After years with Nvidia(FX 5950, 6800ultra, 7950gx2), then years with Amd (1950xt - until now with Vega 64 liquid)... I'm waiting for best video card this summer. Will be Navi or Ampere ? I need a serious upgrade
depends on your definition of "best"
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#19
theGryphon
50% more performance at same power? Possibly... depends on the case.

50% more performance at half the power? BS.
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#20
low
AMD: release big navi
Nvidia: what shall we do? Lets spread news about the next gen to prevent ppl buying big navi.
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#21
kings
What big Navi? Released when?

Big Navi is a rumor at this point, just like Ampere or whatever name Nvidia may call it.
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#22
Vya Domus
The Turing SM was also supposedly 50% faster but ended up being no more than 30% in best case scenario.
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#23
64K
I believe it's possible to gain 50% in performance. Going from the 12nm process to the 7nm process should increase the efficiency and allow for more cores/faster clocks for the same wattage as Turing uses.

I doubt that Nvidia will lower prices though. They won't have a reason to unless Intel comes out with something really good this year for competition. Also, if there are shortages for any reason then we can expect retailer gouging which will make prices higher than they should be for awhile after release.
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#24
TheDeeGee
50% Speed, Half the Power, double the cost.

That's Nvidia alright!
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#25
Valantar
HwGeek
I bet that the "50% uplift" is in RTX ON performance while non RTX performance will remain the same in each segment.
That is the only plausible explanation for something like this, or more precisely: a 50% uplift in perf/W for RT operations. A 300% general perf/W increase in a single generation, even with a full node jump, is completely unheard of. Not going to happen for ordinary rasterized graphics. Period.
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