Wednesday, February 5th 2020

GIGABYTE Rolls Out Designare DDR4-3200 High-Capacity 64GB (2x 32GB) Memory for Creators

The Designare brand of motherboards by GIGABYTE target content creators, and the company is extending the brand to memory, with the new Designare Memory series. It debuts with a high-capacity 64 GB dual-channel memory kit using two 32 GB modules. The rationale behind these densities is that creators may need them to deal with large data-sets. These are not off-spec "double height" modules, but are common dual-rank modules that stick to JEDEC compatibility spec, and pack XMP profiles that can run them at DDR4-3200 with 16-18-18-38 timings at 1.35 V.

GIGABYTE has tested these modules to work on all of its AMD X570, AMD B450, AMD TRX40, Intel X299, and Intel Z390 motherboards. For X570 and B450, however, the company states that only 3rd generation "Matisse" processors can handle this memory density. In its compatibility testing, GIGABYTE used 18-19-19-39 timings. Physically, the Designare modules have regular 32 mm height, a black PCB, and aluminium heatspreaders. GIGABYTE is backing the modules with lifetime warranty. The company didn't reveal pricing.
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24 Comments on GIGABYTE Rolls Out Designare DDR4-3200 High-Capacity 64GB (2x 32GB) Memory for Creators

#1
TechLurker
I actually like how clean and minimalist they look; reminds me of the "gaming RAM" of old, in which a simple aluminum heatspreader was put over otherwise "ugly"/bare RAM sticks. Bonus to the fact that the PCB looks black as well, rather than old-fashioned green. Even newer RAM sticks w/o RGB has a fancy heatspreader design, some of which make them look busy.
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#2
Xuper
Memory Timing is horrible. CL18 ??
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#3
voodooFX
From what language comes the word "Designare"?
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#4
laszlo
Xuper
Memory Timing is horrible. CL18 ??
even these are not gaming modules timings are v. good, considering restrictions due capacity/speed; a 32 gb 2400 mhz module has cl 16.....
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#5
londiste
voodooFX
From what language comes the word "Designare"?
Latin.
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#6
voodooFX
londiste
Latin.
and makes absolutely no sense, I guess they wanted to make something that sounds (and means?) like "design", since it's a "creators" sub-brand
designare (latin) -> designate (english)
---------------------
Definitions of designate

Verb
1
appoint (someone) to a specified position.
The president should not designate a prime minister for the political purposes of winning in the local elections or managing careers for a future presidential candidate.
Synonyms:appointnominatedeputedelegateselectchoosepickelectnameidentifyassign

Adjective
1
appointed to an office or position but not yet installed.
the Director designate
Examples of designate

The contractor must designate a competent person to assess the excavation and determine that it is safe for project personnel to enter and work.
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#7
bug
Xuper
Memory Timing is horrible. CL18 ??
It's ok, Intel doesn't need latency to be super-low :D
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#8
londiste
bug
It's ok, Intel doesn't need latency to be super-low :D
This is a strange and wrong viewpoint. Intel CPUs benefit from lower latency. Technically even more so than Ryzens because lower latency on the memory itself will be a relatively bigger change to the overall latency.
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#9
EarthDog
londiste
This is a strange and wrong viewpoint. Intel CPUs benefit from lower latency. Technically even more so than Ryzens because lower latency on the memory itself will be a relatively bigger change to the overall latency.
While improvements can be had on both, last I recall Ryzen and its chiplet design benefits notably more than Intel and its monolithic design.

If you can tell the difference between XXXX MHz and CL16 vs CL18 when not looking at a benchmark, color me impressed. :)
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#10
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
These are still dual-rank DIMMs and very high density. I guess the timings are okay for 3200.
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#11
EarthDog
londiste
I was responding to a reply to post saying CL18 is horrible timing.
3600 vs 3200 uniquely benefits Ryzen bacause of IF frequency. CL16 vs CL18 is more likely to benefit Intel, although to a much lesser degree.
IF wasnt mentioned by you or big or super until now. That doesnt change much of what I said, however. :)
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#12
bug
EarthDog
IF wasnt mentioned by you or big or super until now. That doesnt change much of what I said, however. :)
I just said AMD loves low latency (hence the Ryzen DRAM calculator) and I believe he countered with "AMD only needs high frequency (because of IF - implied), it's Intel that needs low latency more".
Just to set things straight.
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#13
londiste
Anyhow, my point was that especially with Ryzen you should not get hung up on CL. Max frequency is what you want and need.
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#14
EarthDog
londiste
Anyhow, my point was that especially with Ryzen you should not get hung up on CL. Max frequency is what you want and need.
Looks like a combination of both, really. And once you pass that 1:1 threshold IF:Memory, then latency really starts to suck. You need to sit at 1:1 with the highest frequency possible and lowest timings, generally, for best results. They both play a role (as well as it varying between applications as to how it responds. :)

www.techpowerup.com/review/amd-zen-2-memory-performance-scaling-benchmark/2.html
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#15
londiste
These results are basically unreadable. Memory speed, IF speed and timings all affect results to a different degree plus I am pretty sure RAM at 4000 is no longer 1:1 IF.

Memory frequency has a large effect on memory latency and bandwidth. In Ryzen's case also CPU speed (due to faster inter-core communication). Timings have much lower impact on latency, usually in the tune of couple or few milliseconds which has still minor but more noticeable effect when latency is lower to begin with.
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#16
Chrispy_
Pricing and availability is everything for these higher-density DIMMs.

32GB DIMMS are rare on the UE market right now. In the UK and France, many of the major retailers stock none, or only the ridiculously high-end, high-frequency gaming kits at 3x the cost/GB of standard speed (2400 or 2666) dual-rank RAM. I usually end up buying them for 128GB builds direct from Crucial who will offer sensible pricing for what is just pedestrian 2400 CL14 JEDEC-spec RAM; Creators want stability, not overclocking prowess.

As for the argument here over latencies, all that matters for Ryzen is absolute latency, which is CAS Latency/Frequency.
CL16/3200 = 5.0ns
CL14/2400 = 5.8ns

3600MHz is the fastest that the infinity fabric on Zen2 will run, so there's no point in going beyond that unless you can get MUCH faster, like 4133MHz or higher - where the extra bandwidth starts to become enough of an advantage to undo the damage of slower infinity fabric.
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#17
londiste
@Chrispy_ your frequencies are off by a factor of two.

CAS Latency/Frequency is the latency of memory module itself (with some simplification), what matters for CPU is latency of memory at the core, this includes added latency from memory controller and whatever method of getting data to the core (IF and ringbus for Zen and Skylake respectively).

What matters for Ryzen specifically is not latency - it is the memory frequency due to the resulting IF frequency.
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#18
EarthDog
Chrispy_
3600MHz is the fastest that the infinity fabric on Zen2 will run,
I've seen plenty at 3733... but that is about it (I've seen higher too). AMD themselves said 3600/3733 was the sweet spot and after that is where the IF decouples and latency increases.


There are plenty of articles out there showing the results of this and why you want to, generally, stick to 1:1 whenever you are not going for frequency records.
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#19
Houd.ini
voodooFX
and makes absolutely no sense, I guess they wanted to make something that sounds (and means?) like "design", since it's a "creators" sub-brand
Maybe Gigabyte has some Swedes working for them, "designare" sounds like a Swedish version of "designer" to me :p
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#20
mouacyk
EarthDog
I've seen plenty at 3733... but that is about it (I've seen higher too). AMD themselves said 3600/3733 was the sweet spot and after that is where the IF decouples and latency increases.
[ISPOILER][/ISPOILER]

There are plenty of articles out there showing the results of this and why you want to, generally, stick to 1:1 whenever you are not going for frequency records.
3733 is just official spec. I've seen 1:1 IF up to 1950MHz (effective 3900MHz) on really good silicon. For 2:1, isn't it also possible to beat the latencies listed, with 4000/4200 at C16 (i.e.), such as is possible on Intel platform?
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#21
bug
mouacyk
3733 is just official spec. I've seen 1:1 IF up to 1950MHz (effective 3900MHz) on really good silicon. For 2:1, isn't it also possible to beat the latencies listed, with 4000/4200 at C16 (i.e.), such as is possible on Intel platform?
Of course you did, silicon lottery works for all silicon ;)
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#22
Adam Krazispeed
londiste
Anyhow, my point was that especially with Ryzen you should not get hung up on CL. Max frequency is what you want and need.
actually no, because, once you get past 3800 mhz on 3rd gen ryzen, the Flck & Uclk cant scale with the Mclk, hence why in the bios,...

AMD has that Memory Divider for the Uclk............ aka, @ 1800Mhz x2 ( 3600Mhz) ddr4. uclk @ 1:1 (same as Mclk (1800Mhz ) or 2:1 ( 1/2 Mclk aka 900Mhz uclk) so if u run 1/2 divider, the uclk is only 900Mhz!!! but.... over 3800mhz!


@ 3800 (1900 Mhz) DDR4 you have..... (if at 1:1 - its 1900Mhz )(which most of the time, is MAX) or (2:1 or 1/2 Divider, is 950Mhz... Fclk @ 1900 (or 950 Mhz) (Infinify Fabic Clock)...


so if you ran a 4000 Mhz ram kit...

@4000 Mhz (2000Mhz x2 ) ( 4000 Mhz) ddr4. uclk @ 1:1 (same as Mclk (2000 Mhz *(will not post ) or 2:1 ( 1/2 Mclk aka 1000 Mhz uclk) so if u run 1/2 divider, the uclk is only 1000 Mhz!!! but.... over 4000mhz!
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#23
Chrispy_
EarthDog
I've seen plenty at 3733... but that is about it (I've seen higher too). AMD themselves said 3600/3733 was the sweet spot and after that is where the IF decouples and latency increases.


There are plenty of articles out there showing the results of this and why you want to, generally, stick to 1:1 whenever you are not going for frequency records.
Those were pre-launch slides, and explain why 3600/3733 confusion exists. I believe AMD were hoping to make 3733 the official IF/mclock/uclock 1:1:1 ratio but not all samples at launch were capable of a 1866 IF frequency, so they dialled it back to 1800.

1800MHz is the highest automatic fabric clock before dividers kick in for a 1:2 ratio between the IMC and the RAM itself, confirmed post-launch by official AMD rep in the official AMD reddit in answer to this question.
Amd/comments/cc1hta
You can, of course, overclock. I would expect that most samples, especially the 3600X, 3800X and higher to reach 3733 without any issues. The 65W variants (3700X, 3600) maybe not? Mine doesn't, that's for sure.
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#24
csendesmark
Maybe this is not the RAM of choice yet
But good to see 32GB modules are getting more common,
Some day I will upgrade my 4×16GB RAM with 4×32GB :toast:
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