Friday, May 29th 2020

Intel "Elkhart Lake" Processor Put Through 3DMark

One of the first performance benchmarks of Intel's upcoming low-power processor codenamed "Elkhart Lake," surfaced on the Futuremark database, courtesy of TUM_APISAK. The chip scores 571 points, with a graphics score of 590 and physics score of 3801. The graphics score of the Gen11-based iGPU is behind the Intel UHD 630 gen 9.5 iGPU found in heavier desktop processors since "Kaby Lake," but we predict it's being dragged behind by the CPU (3801 points physics vs. roughly 17000 points of a 6-core "Coffee Lake" processor. The chip goes on to score 170 points in Time Spy, with 148 points graphics- and 1131 points physics-scores. Perhaps Cloud Gate would've been a more apt test.

The "Elkhart Lake" silicon is built on Intel's 10 nm silicon fabrication process, and will power the next generation of Pentium Silver and Celeron processors. The chip features up to 4 CPU cores based on the "Tremont" low-power architecture, and an iGPU based on the newer Gen11 architecture. It features a single-channel memory controller that supports DDR4 and LPDDR4/x memory types. The chip in these 3DMark tests is a 4-core variant, likely a Pentium Silver engineering sample, with its CPU clocked at 1.90 GHz, and is paired with LPDDR4x memory. The chip comes in 5 W, 9 W, and 12 W TDP variants.
Source: TUM_APISAK (Twitter)
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22 Comments on Intel "Elkhart Lake" Processor Put Through 3DMark

#1
Dristun
Completely lost in all these lakes, how can anyone remember and identify correctly which one is which is beyond me. At least AMD has cool painters now!
Posted on Reply
#2
ARF
Dristun
Completely lost in all these lakes, how can anyone remember and identify correctly which one is which is beyond me.
What's more important is the extremely poor performance, this is Pentium 3 or early Pentium 4 type of performance as late as 2020.

Stay away from such..
Posted on Reply
#3
londiste
ARF
What's more important is the extremely poor performance, this is Pentium 3 or early Pentium 4 type of performance as late as 2020.
Stay away from such..
Keep in mind that this is not a desktop CPU as we know it.
This is a new generation Atom. Its direct predecessor is J5040.
Posted on Reply
#4
Assimilator
ARF
What's more important is the extremely poor performance, this is Pentium 3 or early Pentium 4 type of performance as late as 2020.

Stay away from such..
Please show me a P3 or P4 that comes in 5 W, 9 W, and 12 W TDP variants.

I'll wait.
Posted on Reply
#5
ARF
londiste
Keep in mind that this is not a desktop CPU as we know it.
This is a new generation Atom. Its direct predecessor is J5040.
Qualcomm's Snapdragon will run circles around it. Both with lower TDP and multiple times higher performance.
Posted on Reply
#6
ratirt
Assimilator
Please show me a P3 or P4 that comes in 5 W, 9 W, and 12 W TDP variants.

I'll wait.
He said performance wise not power consumption wise.
Posted on Reply
#7
Assimilator
ratirt
He said performance wise not power consumption wise.
my point * ---->

your head 0
Posted on Reply
#8
ratirt
Assimilator
my point * ---->

your head 0
Is that so? You completely omitted what @ARF was trying to say and he is right. Performance wise, these CPUs will perform like Pentium 3's or early 4's considering their score acquired in the benchmark. Everyone knows the power consumption will be low but that wasn't the point.
Posted on Reply
#9
Assimilator
ratirt
Is that so? You completely omitted what @ARF was trying to say and he is right. Performance wise, these CPUs will perform like Pentium 3's or early 4's considering their score acquired in the benchmark. Everyone knows the power consumption will be low but that wasn't the point.
My point was that ARF's comment is inane because it's like calling out a Lamborghini for not being fuel-efficient - well no s**t Sherlock, it ain't designed to be!

Yes, both observations are technically correct, but they aren't particularly useful, nor are they conducive to constructive conversation around the topic at hand.
Posted on Reply
#10
ratirt
Assimilator
My point was that ARF's comment is inane because it's like calling out a Lamborghini for not being fuel-efficient - well no s**t Sherlock, it ain't designed to be!

Yes, both observations are technically correct, but they aren't particularly useful, nor are they conducive to constructive conversation around the topic at hand.
Sure but it has been mentioned as well that there are more efficient and more powerful better CPUs as well.
Posted on Reply
#11
Darmok N Jalad
Of course it doesn’t consume P3/P4 power levels. It has 20 years of process improvements. A P3 was on 180nm! That said, a PIII at 1.0GHz was only rated at 29W TDP. That era of CPU had relatively low power consumption compared to today. Intel has had some impressive products, but the ‘mont architecture hasn’t really been one of them, IMO, especially lately.
Posted on Reply
#12
Decryptor009
Darmok N Jalad
Of course it doesn’t consume P3/P4 power levels. It has 20 years of process improvements. A P3 was on 180nm! That said, a PIII at 1.0GHz was only rated at 29W TDP. That era of CPU had relatively low power consumption compared to today. Intel has had some impressive products, but the ‘mont architecture hasn’t really been one of them, IMO, especially lately.
Pretty sure my coffee table is 180nm.
Posted on Reply
#13
Assimilator
Decryptor009
Pretty sure my coffee table is 180nm.
Your FACE is 180nm huehuehue
Posted on Reply
#14
AusWolf
Dristun
Completely lost in all these lakes, how can anyone remember and identify correctly which one is which is beyond me. At least AMD has cool painters now!
Agreed. Besides, AMD has finished products, Intel is just throwing news about these lakes around without ever releasing one.
Posted on Reply
#15
ypsylon
The very important question is: How many Lakes Intel know in the Universe?

I can see they are for very long Lake haul. :D

It's now a full time job to keep-up with all Lake-tinymicroredesigns.
Posted on Reply
#16
silentbogo
For an Atom that's not too bad. Nearly on-par with desktop Pentiums of yesteryear(G3258 and such).
ARF
What's more important is the extremely poor performance, this is Pentium 3 or early Pentium 4 type of performance as late as 2020.
Assimilator
Please show me a P3 or P4 that comes in 5 W, 9 W, and 12 W TDP variants.
I'll put a little twist into this exchange: please find me a P4 that can do 3800 physics score in Firestrike. I'll give a little hint: it's about quarter that stock.
Posted on Reply
#17
watzupken
"The chip in these 3DMark tests is a 4-core variant, likely a Pentium Silver engineering sample, with its CPU clocked at 1.90 GHz, and is paired with LPDDR4x memory "

I think this is the catch. To date, I have not seen a PC maker adorning Pentium Silver based laptops with high end specs. Unless this trend is changing with the release of Elkhart Lake, I am not expecting to see performance close to what is mentioned here and in the leak. Even if they do, I am not sure people will be willing to pay more for laptops with Pentium Silver processors when there are better alternatives out there.
Posted on Reply
#18
jabbadap
londiste
Keep in mind that this is not a desktop CPU as we know it.
This is a new generation Atom. Its direct predecessor is J5040.
Well those atom boards with bga cpu have been around for a while now, but I agree main market for these chips are low powered thingies. And predecessor for J5040 would be Skyhawk Lake, Elkhart lake is whole new E-series product category for IoT. Not sure how it differs from Skyhawk though, when the TDP range is the same and it should come to the market at the same time.
Posted on Reply
#19
silentbogo
jabbadap
Not sure how it differs from Skyhawk though, when the TDP range is the same and it should come to the market at the same time.
Nothing prevents those from co-existing. These are two different markets. Skyhawk Lake would be an updated N-series (cheap netbooks/nettops/thin clients), and Elkhard Lake is the E-series (embedded).
It's a successor to Denverton, which as of today can only be found in overpriced SMB networking devices. Intel markets these upcoming chips for use in signage, portable terminals etc, but I highly doubt it'll go beyond routers and mini-servers.

But I do agree with all our skeptics - there's way too many lakes to keep track of. Even right now, when most of it is still in the air, I'm forced to do ARK search and 5-minutes of googling just to figure out whether that laptop or this embedded board is good enough for my use case. Just 2-3 years ago it was all nice and easy, even with variety of offshoot products like Xeon D and Atom E.
Posted on Reply
#20
micropage7
before read it further, the name is not promising at all
and i can't expect more
Posted on Reply
#21
watzupken
silentbogo
But I do agree with all our skeptics - there's way too many lakes to keep track of. Even right now, when most of it is still in the air, I'm forced to do ARK search and 5-minutes of googling just to figure out whether that laptop or this embedded board is good enough for my use case. Just 2-3 years ago it was all nice and easy, even with variety of offshoot products like Xeon D and Atom E.
This is true. Even I am getting confused what lake is what lake now. Its good to know that Intel is busy working on new CPU architectures though.
Posted on Reply
#22
AusWolf
watzupken
This is true. Even I am getting confused what lake is what lake now. Its good to know that Intel is busy working on new CPU architectures though.
...that aren't any different from previous ones, or at least that's what the "... Lake" codename suggests.
Posted on Reply
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