Friday, November 13th 2020

LLNL's New 'Ruby' Supercomputer Taps Intel for COVID-19 Research

Intel today announced that Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) will leverage Intel Xeon Scalable processors in "Ruby," its latest high performance computing cluster. The Ruby system will be used for unclassified programmatic work in support of the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) stockpile stewardship mission, for researching therapeutic drugs and designer antibodies against SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, and for other open science work at LLNL.

Ruby was built in collaboration with Intel, LLNL, Supermicro and Cornelis Networks. The system consists of more than 1,500 nodes, each outfitted with Intel Xeon Scalable processors, and features 192 gigabytes of memory. Ruby will deliver 6 petaflops of peak performance and is expected to rank among the world's top 100 most powerful supercomputers.
Ruby Supercomputer and COVID-19 Work
The Ruby supercomputer will help solve scientific challenges across many disciplines. The system is ideal for running molecular docking calculations that are used in areas such as therapeutic drug research. LLNL researchers recently began using Ruby to identify candidate compounds capable of binding to protein sites in the structure of SARS-CoV-2. This small molecule work could inform vaccine development and help researchers with drug discovery efforts related to COVID-19.

Additional applications for Ruby include large-scale simulations of plasma dynamics and neutron production at LLNL's MegaJOuLe Neutron Imaging Radiography system and simulations for inertial confinement fusion research conducted at the National Ignition Facility and Sandia National Laboratories' Z-machine facility. The system will also be used for researching asteroid detection, moon formation, high-fidelity fission and other basic science through LLNL's Computing Grand Challenge and Laboratory Directed Research and Development programs.

"Our longstanding partnership with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory continues to drive tremendous advancements in scientific research and discovery across a range of applications," said Trish Damkroger, vice president and general manager of high performance computing at Intel. "We are excited to see the Ruby supercomputer now contributing to COVID-19 research."

The Ruby supercomputer is funded by NNSA's Advanced Simulation and Computing program, the Laboratory's Multi-programmatic and Institutional Computing program, and the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act.
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23 Comments on LLNL's New 'Ruby' Supercomputer Taps Intel for COVID-19 Research

#1
lynx29
will also be used for asteroid detection.

nice lol nice to see that area is still getting up to date funding
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#2
Caring1
I see AMD and Intel are still toying with each other's names.
AMD's Ruby was first. :laugh:
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#3
john_
"We choose Intel because we strive to be second in every breakthrough about Covid-19".
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#4
JustAnEngineer
These ginormous government computing research centers aren't generally planning to buy one half-billion dollar system with the best processor. They're trying to get multiple systems with every processor. :laugh:
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#5
windwhirl
lynx29
will also be used for asteroid detection.
And DARPA wasting money in those silly robots when they should be building the heavy turbolaser cannons needed to destroy all those asteroids.
JustAnEngineer
These ginormous government computing research centers aren't generally planning to buy one half-billion dollar system with the best processor. They're trying to get multiple systems with every processor. :laugh:
"It's all for redundancy, we swear"
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#6
DeathtoGnomes
john_
"We choose Intel because we strive to be second in every breakthrough about Covid-19".
I didnt see this, but that damn funny! :respect: :roll:
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#7
owen10578
I bet Intel's giving those Xeons out for free with a pack of candies
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#8
R-T-B
windwhirl
And DARPA wasting money in those silly robots when they should be building the heavy turbolaser cannons needed to destroy all those asteroids.
Turbolasers? But then a small unmanned asteroid could make it past our defenses!
Posted on Reply
#9
windwhirl
R-T-B
Turbolasers? But then a small unmanned asteroid could make it past our defenses!
Compensate not fast enough rate of fire with more cannons. You can never go wrong adding more of them.
Posted on Reply
#10
Bones
windwhirl
Compensate not fast enough rate of fire with more cannons. You can never go wrong adding more of them.
I'm sure if they look around they'll find a few left-over "Death Lasers" from the 1960's they could use.
Clean 'em up, aim and zap those pesky asteroids.
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#11
dragontamer5788
R-T-B
Turbolasers? But then a small unmanned asteroid could make it past our defenses!
I don't believe it is the unmanned asteroids to worry about, but instead the small one-manned asteroids.

Posted on Reply
#12
windwhirl
dragontamer5788
I don't believe it is the unmanned asteroids to worry about, but instead the small one-manned asteroids.


I was thinking more around the lines of Starship Troopers :laugh:
Posted on Reply
#13
bonehead123
Maybe I missed something here, but what EXACTLY does "nuclear security" have to do with drug research ?

I believe these rigs will be used for something far moar deeper, far moar sinister, like, oh I don't know, detecting & destroying Chineese & Russion nuclear missles & their undergroud/cave-dwelling silos.....

Or perhaps finding that young laddie who knocked up the Emporor's 12 yo daughter & then went into hiding, hahahaha :)
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#14
dragontamer5788
bonehead123
Maybe I missed something here, but what EXACTLY does "nuclear security" have to do with drug research ?
They both use supercomputers.

Eventually, COVID19 will be conquered, and then new software will be loaded onto the machine. Probably nukes, but there's lots of other supercomputer tasks (weather prediction, ASIC chip verification, FEA or simulated car-crashes) that pop up constantly.

That's the joy of software. The same machine today can be used for playing video games, and then swap to editing videos, and then swap to 3d modeling. Same thing with supercomputers: a supercomputer owned by the US Government can be used for US Strategic interests, as those interests change. Right now, the priority is clearly COVID19. Maybe in a year or two, it will be predicting the path of some super-hurricane.
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#15
DeathtoGnomes
dragontamer5788
I don't believe it is the unmanned asteroids to worry about, but instead the small one-manned asteroids.


is that a giant butt passing gas?
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#16
claes
“We make the greatest investments in science and technology in the world and we have one of the highest mortality rates from Covid” lol :( :love:
Posted on Reply
#17
windwhirl
dragontamer5788
Eventually, COVID19 will be conquered, and then new software will be loaded onto the machine. Probably nukes, but there's lots of other supercomputer tasks (weather prediction, ASIC chip verification, FEA or simulated car-crashes) that pop up constantly.
I don't understand what's the thing with studying and researching nukes all the time... Don't they already know the yields of each design already?
claes
“We make the greatest investments in science and technology in the world and we have one of the highest mortality rates from Covid” lol :( :love:
Well, it's a relatively new virus, you can't just make a vaccine for it in three months. I don't condone quarantines after what I've seen, but a lot of people were being really stupid with not wearing masks just because they didn't want to.

And then you have politicians being idiots or downright pieces of shit. Pick your poison.
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#18
R-T-B
windwhirl
Compensate not fast enough rate of fire with more cannons. You can never go wrong adding more of them.

You can learn a lot from star wars, but probably nothing from me, so I'll stop.
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#19
dragontamer5788
windwhirl
I don't understand what's the thing with studying and researching nukes all the time... Don't they already know the yields of each design already?
The only nuclear theory I know is the stuff I learned from Factorio.

I think you need purple science and yellow science to research Nukes. Then you build a lot of labs to drink the purple and yellow science. But as everyone knows, artillery is more efficient than nukes anyway and more automated. You might also run your trains in a loop, which is very effective at defense. Trains have so much HP and deal so much damage running into things, you probably never have to build a nuke.

Yeah, between the Artillery patch from 0.18 and train HP, and roboports, I don't think nukes are very useful anymore either.

EDIT: Ah right: Nukes are the fastest way to clear a forest. So nukes are still very useful for that.
Posted on Reply
#20
windwhirl
R-T-B

You can learn a lot from star wars, but probably nothing from me, so I'll stop.
The empire's starship designers were idiots. They installed the shield generators, all of them with a very distinct shape, on the goddamn outside of the destroyers, and didn't add enough point-defense laser cannons to protect the shield generators and the bridge, with the latter basically standing out all over the ship.
dragontamer5788
The only nuclear theory I know is the stuff I learned from Factorio.

I think you need purple science and yellow science to research Nukes. Then you build a lot of labs to drink the purple and yellow science. But as everyone knows, artillery is more efficient than nukes anyway and more automated. You might also run your trains in a loop, which is very effective at defense. Trains have so much HP and deal so much damage running into things, you probably never have to build a nuke.

Yeah, between the Artillery patch from 0.18 and train HP, and roboports, I don't think nukes are very useful anymore either.

EDIT: Ah right: Nukes are the fastest way to clear a forest. So nukes are still very useful for that.
Well, supposedly they're there mostly to dissuade any potential adversary from a full-scale conflict. Then again, that theory may seem to work only between nuclear powers, that will do their best to avoid MAD. Soft power demonstrations are preferred (economics, diplomacy, breaching into other countries' internet-connected infrastructure, etc.).
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#21
yotano211
R-T-B
Turbolasers? But then a small unmanned asteroid could make it past our defenses!
Make sure there is no 2 meter size hole
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#22
Gmr_Chick
DeathtoGnomes
is that a giant butt passing gas?
You, good sir, get the award for Funniest TPU Post :roll: :respect: Also, great minds think alike :D

Another thing it could be is an old crusty tiddy doing...something :fear:
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#23
R-T-B
DeathtoGnomes
is that a giant butt passing gas?
This is why I fear space.

Back to the topic, does anyone find it ironic that the Supercomputer is called Ruby? Like AMD Ruby? Lol.
Posted on Reply
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