Monday, December 28th 2020

Akasa Rolls Out Turing A50 Case for ASUS PN50 Ryzen 4000-powered Mini PC

Akasa ended the year with the release of the Turing A50, a fanless all-aluminium case with which you can replace the case that comes with the ASUS PN50 mini-PC. The ASUS PN50, if you recall, is a NUC-sized mini-PC that uses 15-Watt AMD Ryzen 4000-series "Renoir" mobile processors. The Akasa Turing A50 is a variation of the original Turing NUC case the company released back in February 2019, but with its innards re-designed for the ASUS PN50 mainboard. On the front side, you get mounts for the board's headset jack, two USB 3.2 ports (from which one is type-C and has DisplayPort passthrough), and the IR receiver. The rear has mounts for the three other display outputs, and a couple more USB ports, and the DC power input. Internally, the case features an SoC cooler base designed to mount onto the "Renoir" SoC, from which a few copper heat-pipes convey heat to the case's aluminium body, which doubles up as a heatsink. Fanless Tech reports that the case should be available from February 2021.
Source: Fanless Tech
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5 Comments on Akasa Rolls Out Turing A50 Case for ASUS PN50 Ryzen 4000-powered Mini PC

#1
LTUGamer
Hm, they made a case to upgrade specific prebuild PC. How many of those they expect to sell?
Posted on Reply
#2
bonehead123
Overall I like it, and even though is was designed for a specific mini-pc, it's good to see somebody at least trying to do something a little different design-wise, which is a whole lot moar than we can say for almost every other pc case mfgr out there in the past 3-4 years....

Perhaps some gifted modder will figure out more uses for it :D
Posted on Reply
#3
sepheronx
bonehead123Overall I like it, and even though is was designed for a specific mini-pc, it's good to see somebody at least trying to do something a little different design-wise, which is a whole lot moar than we can say for almost every other pc case mfgr out there in the past 3-4 years....

Perhaps some gifted modder will figure out more uses for it :D
Case design these days are pathetic indeed. They just make them overly large for no reason (a ton of wasted space), lots of glass and just generally same design overall.
Posted on Reply
#4
Zareek
I'm glad to see Akasa's low volume business model is still working for them. In my experience Akasa cases cool processors better than the original designs. Example, Intel NUCs usually have a little tiny heatsink fan in them. If you extract the motherboard and put into an Akasa passive case and it will run much cooler with zero noise. At the time my goal was getting rid of fans to avoid metallic dust ingress but the cases not only did that, they made the NUCs run faster. I obviously can't speak for this model but that was my experience several years ago with a few different Akasa cases and a few different Intel NUC models.
Posted on Reply
#5
Lnxepique
Whew this is a really nice design, hats off to Akasa for making something that sets itself apart while looking really sleek and modern!
Posted on Reply
Jul 3rd, 2022 08:44 EDT change timezone

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