Tuesday, March 9th 2021

be quiet! Announces Pure Rock Slim 2 CPU Cooler and MC1 Series M.2 SSD Heatsinks

be quiet!, market leader for PC power supplies in Germany since 2007, is expanding its portfolio with the revised Pure Rock Slim 2 CPU cooler and the MC1 and MC1 Pro SSD coolers suitable for M.2 2280 modules. With its reliable and quiet 92-millimeter Pure Wings 2 PWM fan and three 6 mm heat pipes, the Pure Rock Slim 2 can reliably dissipate waste heat of up to 130 W TDP. Thanks to its small dimensions the cooler is especially suitable for cases with limited space, while compatibility with AMD sockets has been improved over its predecessor. The new MC1 and MC1 Pro M.2 coolers reliably prevent modern SSDs from throttling due to excessive temperatures. Both models are equally suitable for single- or double-sided modules and feature an elegant black design that perfectly fits into any hardware layout.

The new be quiet! Pure Rock Slim 2 is a processor cooler with compact dimensions that dissipates waste heat of up to 130 watts thanks to its sophisticated design. With its optimized mounting system, the compact tower cooler's installation is child's play, even in tight spaces, and makes airflow-aligned installation on AMD sockets even easier. The single-tower cooler features a single Pure Wings 2 92 mm PWM fan. Thanks to its airflow-optimized fan blades this ensures that the cooler does not get louder than 25.4 dB(A) during operation.
To ensure that the heat reaches the aluminium fins of the Pure Rock Slim 2 from the processor as quickly and efficiently as possible, be quiet! uses three direct-touch heat pipes with a diameter of 6 millimeters each. Due to the cooler's compact design, the installation of RAM modules with protruding heatsinks is possible without any problems. A top cover made of brushed aluminium and the aluminium caps attached to the ends of the heat pipes ensure a high-quality appearance. be quiet! offers a 3-year warranty on the Pure Rock Slim 2.

MC1 and MC1 Pro: Keeping hot SSDs cool
Modern M.2 SSDs offer speeds that are clearly superior to a conventional hard drive. However, the storage modules sometimes get very hot during operation and will significantly throttle their speed when they reach a certain temperature. This is precisely where the new M.2 coolers MC1 and MC1 Pro from be quiet! come in. The heatsinks absorb the waste heat from the SSD and release it into its surroundings. Equipped in this way, the drive can maintain its maximum speed even under prolonged load. The new be quiet! SSD coolers are suitable for 2280 modules that are equipped with single- or double-sided memory chips. Both models are classic passive coolers, although the MC1 Pro also has an integrated heat pipe for even better heat dissipation. The MC1 and MC1 Pro M.2 coolers come with a 3-year warranty from be quiet!

The be quiet! Pure Rock Slim 2 will be available from March 23 for €25.90 / $25.90 / £23.99. The M.2 coolers MC1 and MC1 Pro will hit the stores in April at €12.90 / $12.90 / £11.99 and €16.90 / $16.90 / £14.99 respectively.
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40 Comments on be quiet! Announces Pure Rock Slim 2 CPU Cooler and MC1 Series M.2 SSD Heatsinks

#1
DrCR
Remarkably low heatpipe count. I guess they were building for that $25 price.
Posted on Reply
#2
Sithaer
I'm using the first version of pure rock slim since 2018 may on my 1600x.

Had/have zero issues with it and its still as silent as brand new.
Temps are usually under 60 celsius when gaming, during summer it sometimes goes over 60 when playing a more CPU intense game but thats still not too bad imo. 'during summer its like 28-30 celsius in my room..'

In this price range its great imo and better than the stock coolers, probably not for OCing but that was never my plan as I don't OC anything.
Also not a fan of overkill/brick sized tower coolers in my PCs so this was perfect.
Posted on Reply
#3
DeathtoGnomes
why 92mm? 100mm would have been better I think
Posted on Reply
#4
kayjay010101
DeathtoGnomeswhy 92mm? 100mm would have been better I think
When was the last time anyone bought a 100mm fan? 2011?
100mm hasn't been a normal fan size in a decade. 92mm is still abundant for when 120mm is too large.
Posted on Reply
#5
DeathtoGnomes
kayjay010101When was the last time anyone bought a 100mm fan? 2011?
100mm hasn't been a normal fan size in a decade. 92mm is still abundant for when 120mm is too large.
I guess, but I look for fan size on a cooler more than anything, fan noise is secondary attribute to look at. That usually means larger fans mean more cfm and less noise. Cheaping out on fans just because of availability does not win points from me. For all we know, those are the same 92mm fans that were probably left over from a 2005 batch run.
Posted on Reply
#6
yotano211
DeathtoGnomesI guess, but I look for fan size on a cooler more than anything, fan noise is secondary attribute to look at. That usually means larger fans mean more cfm and less noise. Cheaping out on fans just because of availability does not win points from me. For all we know, those are the same 92mm fans that were probably left over from a 2005 batch run.
The cooler cost $25.90. Don't expect Jesus level miracles. Its entry level.
Posted on Reply
#7
dyonoctis
DeathtoGnomesI guess, but I look for fan size on a cooler more than anything, fan noise is secondary attribute to look at. That usually means larger fans mean more cfm and less noise. Cheaping out on fans just because of availability does not win points from me. For all we know, those are the same 92mm fans that were probably left over from a 2005 batch run.
I had the pure rock slim v1, It's silent as long as you don't overestimate is capabilities. A budget cooler for a budget quad core/six core at stock speed. It doesn't try to compete with something like the NH-U9S that cost more than twice the price of the pure rock 2.
The pure wings 2 92 nm are like a third of the total cost :
be quiet! Pure Wings 2 92mm - Ventilateur boîtier Be Quiet ! sur LDLC.com
Posted on Reply
#10
ThrashZone
Hi,
Yep biggest difference is the larger/ taller aluminum base might be nickel plated ? and the three pipes aren't flattened on the base.
Posted on Reply
#11
Valantar
DeathtoGnomesI guess, but I look for fan size on a cooler more than anything, fan noise is secondary attribute to look at. That usually means larger fans mean more cfm and less noise. Cheaping out on fans just because of availability does not win points from me. For all we know, those are the same 92mm fans that were probably left over from a 2005 batch run.
Uh, 92mm fans are still very common. They've been supplanted by widespread 120mm and 140mm support in cases, but in SFF and on coolers they're still quite normal. This cooler uses fans that BQ already makes and sells. 100mm has on the other hand never even been a standard PC fan size, and designing and manufacturing a brand new fan design for a €25 cooler makes no sense.
Posted on Reply
#12
tabascosauz
DeathtoGnomesI guess, but I look for fan size on a cooler more than anything, fan noise is secondary attribute to look at. That usually means larger fans mean more cfm and less noise. Cheaping out on fans just because of availability does not win points from me. For all we know, those are the same 92mm fans that were probably left over from a 2005 batch run.
92mm tower is the only way you can fit decent air cooling performance under 125mm height without severely compromising socket area compatibility. Haven't seen a 100mm fan lately, but even if it was one I doubt you'd want to use it (BQ's Pure Wings fans are pretty low quality esp. bearings compared to Silent Wings) if there's nothing out there that you could replace it with.

As for fan speed, yes, but that's not really a 92mm problem, you just don't buy any of BQ's fans for performance. All of them have cripplingly low rpm ranges in the name of quietness, which is a good thing for your ears, not so good for pushing air.

Hell, I'd love to use this cooler for a future build. For a cheap 10400-level office PC, there's no way I'm shelling out for a NH-U9S, no way I'm using a crappy Intel pushpin cooler, and no way I'm getting one of those generic 92mm tower coolers from some obscure brand with sketchy mounting hardware and zero customer support. Having a cheap option from a big name like Be Quiet is definitely a good thing.
Posted on Reply
#13
dyonoctis
tabascosauzAs for fan speed, yes, but that's not really a 92mm problem, you just don't buy any of BQ's fans for performance. All of them have cripplingly low rpm ranges in the name of quietness, which is a good thing for your ears, not so good for pushing air.
Be quiet does have high speed fans the silent wings 3 have a 2200rpm version and the pure wings a 2000rpm version. Their shadow wings are the only one who are stuck on low speed, but those are meant to be case fans
www.bequiet.com/en/casefans/720
Posted on Reply
#14
Mussels
Moderprator
Owning the dark rock slim, i can say this probably out performs what people would expect it to at stupidly low noise - these are what you go for if you want a silent stock replacement
Posted on Reply
#15
DeathtoGnomes
yotano211Don't expect Jesus level miracles. Its entry level.
I cant? well crap, that spoils my day... :shadedshu:
Posted on Reply
#16
Chrispy_
DrCRRemarkably low heatpipe count. I guess they were building for that $25 price.
With Rocket lake guzzling down almost 300W (that's not overclocked, that's just stock AVX512) and Zen3 preferring to boost up to 90C (to extract the most boost headroom the cooling can provide) it seems there is little reason to purchase a cheapo 3-heatpipe cooler any more.

You're not going to get performance or silence with Rocketlake/Zen3 using an underwhelming cooler any more. The days of a "65W" SKU performing optimally on a small, inexpensive cooler are behind us.

You either tune your fan curves to make the stock cooler quiet, and accept lower performance as a result, or you pay up for a cooler that is capable of extracting the performance potential from your silicon. My 5800X gets a relatively decent heatsink and fan but I assume it will always boost to 90C and set the fan curve to limit the fan speed to tolerable noise levels at 90C. Works like a charm, leaves some performance on the table though (as can be seen from my cinebench scores in the thread)
Posted on Reply
#17
thegnome
Chrispy_With Rocket lake guzzling down almost 300W (that's not overclocked, that's just stock AVX512) and Zen3 preferring to boost up to 90C (to extract the most boost headroom the cooling can provide) it seems there is little reason to purchase a cheapo 3-heatpipe cooler any more.

You're not going to get performance or silence with Rocketlake/Zen3 using an underwhelming cooler any more. The days of a "65W" SKU performing optimally on a small, inexpensive cooler are behind us.

You either tune your fan curves to make the stock cooler quiet, and accept lower performance as a result, or you pay up for a cooler that is capable of extracting the performance potential from your silicon. My 5800X gets a relatively decent heatsink and fan but I assume it will always boost to 90C and set the fan curve to limit the fan speed to tolerable noise levels at 90C. Works like a charm, leaves some performance on the table though (as can be seen from my cinebench scores in the thread)
Zen 3's 6/8 core heat load is quite low, so you don't even need a huge heatsink to cool it. More a result of the dies and ihs not quite capable enough to transfer the heat & obviously some core design flaws. Anything that can take heat away fast enough would easily get it under 85C.
Posted on Reply
#18
Valantar
Chrispy_With Rocket lake guzzling down almost 300W (that's not overclocked, that's just stock AVX512) and Zen3 preferring to boost up to 90C (to extract the most boost headroom the cooling can provide) it seems there is little reason to purchase a cheapo 3-heatpipe cooler any more.

You're not going to get performance or silence with Rocketlake/Zen3 using an underwhelming cooler any more. The days of a "65W" SKU performing optimally on a small, inexpensive cooler are behind us.

You either tune your fan curves to make the stock cooler quiet, and accept lower performance as a result, or you pay up for a cooler that is capable of extracting the performance potential from your silicon. My 5800X gets a relatively decent heatsink and fan but I assume it will always boost to 90C and set the fan curve to limit the fan speed to tolerable noise levels at 90C. Works like a charm, leaves some performance on the table though (as can be seen from my cinebench scores in the thread)
What's the point of a black and white approach like that? This will clearly be both cooler and quieter than stock coolers, and at €25 it's a bargain. You'd easily need to pay twice that for something markedly better. That is obviously not a lot of money in the grand scheme of things, but it might still be the difference between, say, a 256GB or 512GB SSD in a budget build. Or, in a normal market, it might give you the budget leeway to move up a step in GPU performance - not that that's relevant these days though. But nonetheless, there's no reason to argue that this is utterly pointless. It has a very clear purpose. It's obviously never meant to be the best at anything, but it's a much better than stock cooler for a reasonable price, and that's nothing to scoff at.
Posted on Reply
#19
Mussels
Moderprator
Chrispy_With Rocket lake guzzling down almost 300W (that's not overclocked, that's just stock AVX512) and Zen3 preferring to boost up to 90C (to extract the most boost headroom the cooling can provide) it seems there is little reason to purchase a cheapo 3-heatpipe cooler any more.

You're not going to get performance or silence with Rocketlake/Zen3 using an underwhelming cooler any more. The days of a "65W" SKU performing optimally on a small, inexpensive cooler are behind us.

You either tune your fan curves to make the stock cooler quiet, and accept lower performance as a result, or you pay up for a cooler that is capable of extracting the performance potential from your silicon. My 5800X gets a relatively decent heatsink and fan but I assume it will always boost to 90C and set the fan curve to limit the fan speed to tolerable noise levels at 90C. Works like a charm, leaves some performance on the table though (as can be seen from my cinebench scores in the thread)
You're forgetting that theres a billion chips already on the market for various intel and AMD sockets that still use <100W

This is perfectly fine as an upgrade for all the dells out there, for replacing a wraith stealth, and so on. It's not FOR the enthusiast or performance market.
Posted on Reply
#20
Vader
Chrispy_With Rocket lake guzzling down almost 300W (that's not overclocked, that's just stock AVX512) and Zen3 preferring to boost up to 90C (to extract the most boost headroom the cooling can provide) it seems there is little reason to purchase a cheapo 3-heatpipe cooler any more.

You're not going to get performance or silence with Rocketlake/Zen3 using an underwhelming cooler any more. The days of a "65W" SKU performing optimally on a small, inexpensive cooler are behind us.

You either tune your fan curves to make the stock cooler quiet, and accept lower performance as a result, or you pay up for a cooler that is capable of extracting the performance potential from your silicon. My 5800X gets a relatively decent heatsink and fan but I assume it will always boost to 90C and set the fan curve to limit the fan speed to tolerable noise levels at 90C. Works like a charm, leaves some performance on the table though (as can be seen from my cinebench scores in the thread)
To everyone's response to this post, i'd like to add that both on amd and intel, you can reduce the power output of your cpu if it overwhelms your cooler, or increase it if you have thermal headroom. It's a balancing act between power, noise and temperature.
It's almost as if you could combine any cpu with any cooler and make both work well by tweaking parameters provided by the manufacturers
Posted on Reply
#21
Chrispy_
thegnomeZen 3's 6/8 core heat load is quite low, so you don't even need a huge heatsink to cool it. More a result of the dies and ihs not quite capable enough to transfer the heat & obviously some core design flaws. Anything that can take heat away fast enough would easily get it under 85C.
Zen3 gets hot by design, even the 5600X. AMD have officially commented that it will boost to around 90C on purpose to maximise the temperature delta and extract the maximum efficiency out of the cooler for better boost performance. Even with PBO disabled and a high-quality cooler with a high-RPM fan, my hotspot temperatures on a 5800X are about 90C. This is how it is intended to function, and you need to modify settings to non-stock operation if you want different behaviour, or you need to overwhelm the CPU with far more powerful cooling to keep the IHS at below 40C in order to prevent hotspots deep within the chip from getting to 90C.
ValantarWhat's the point of a black and white approach like that? This will clearly be both cooler and quieter than stock coolers, and at €25 it's a bargain.
Because it's not a bargain. A bargain is a €15 Hyper TX3 or the infamous $9 Snowman cooler. If you're going to spend €25 there are far more capable coolers out there with more performance on the table. I'm not saying this is a bad cooler, just that this is a bad price for what is clearly a cheap cooler.
MusselsYou're forgetting that theres a billion chips already on the market for various intel and AMD sockets that still use <100W

This is perfectly fine as an upgrade for all the dells out there, for replacing a wraith stealth, and so on. It's not FOR the enthusiast or performance market.
People repairing old Dells (like me) usually just slap a new fan on the existing cooler. It's a fraction of the cost, and if necessary there are sub-$10 coolers like the stock heatsinks all over amazon/ebay. As I just said to Valatar, at €25 this is firmly into the "performance/premium" territory at 50% more expensive than mainstream, big-brand competition and 200% more expensive than the obvious fix for a broken old HSF.
VaderTo everyone's response to this post, i'd like to add that both on amd and intel, you can reduce the power output of your cpu if it overwhelms your cooler, or increase it if you have thermal headroom. It's a balancing act between power, noise and temperature.
It's almost as if you could combine any cpu with any cooler and make both work well by tweaking parameters provided by the manufacturers
It's worth pointing out that with Zen3, it's unlikely that it would overwhelm your cooler. The hotspot temperatures are much like a target temperature with Zen3. No matter how good or bad your cooling, it will aim to keep boosting voltages and clocks until the target temperature is reached. A weaker cooler will just prevent it from boosting as high, and only if you have sufficiently powerful cooling will you hit power limits (at stock settings) before reaching 90C.

The reason AMD officially addressed concerns over temperature is because even people with AIOs and $100 air coolers were hitting 85-90C at stock settings before attempting to overclock. Zen3's temperature and boosting algorithm is just different to Zen2, much like Intel's has been for a while. It will boost as high as it can, as hot as it can, for as long as it can and if you're not hitting 90C then it just means you're leaving potential performance on the table now.

I run mine quiet; In that balancing act between power, noise, and temperature I choose to restrict noise and let the new boost algorithm work out how to juggle power. If I wanted lower temps I would just set a manual PBO+ profile with a 75C temperature threshold.
Posted on Reply
#22
Liquid Cool
I love the Be Quiet! 92mm fan on these coolers. Dead silent...and some of us actually consider fan noise first. I know I do.

Although, as far as the cooler is concerned...I wasn't all that impressed with the AMD mounting bracket on the original V1 Slim. I'm stretching here as far my memory goes, but it either seemed cheap or gimmicky...I can't recall which. Might be both....

I do know I am going to have to revisit that thought soon though...I have another build in the works and my "go-to" budget cooler, the Cryorig M9a had another price increase just last week. At 25.90 MSRP I'll definitely be taking a closer look at the V2. It may just be my new cooler of choice....

Again...I'll mention how much I like the Be Quiet! 92mm fans...I even started to add them to my Cryorig coolers.



I've used this setup on my Ryzen 3 3200g's and my Ryzen 5 2600's without any hassles whatsoever. Even while gaming. Zero noise.

As of right now, my favorite budget cpu cooler setup is a Cryorig M9a with a 92mm PureWings 2 fan.

This may soon be changing....:).

Best,

Liquid Cool
Posted on Reply
#23
dyonoctis
Chrispy_Zen3 gets hot by design, even the 5600X. AMD have officially commented that it will boost to around 90C on purpose to maximise the temperature delta and extract the maximum efficiency out of the cooler for better boost performance. Even with PBO disabled and a high-quality cooler with a high-RPM fan, my hotspot temperatures on a 5800X are about 90C. This is how it is intended to function, and you need to modify settings to non-stock operation if you want different behaviour, or you need to overwhelm the CPU with far more powerful cooling to keep the IHS at below 40C in order to prevent hotspots deep within the chip from getting to 90C.

Because it's not a bargain. A bargain is a €15 Hyper TX3 or the infamous $9 Snowman cooler. If you're going to spend €25 there are far more capable coolers out there with more performance on the table. I'm not saying this is a bad cooler, just that this is a bad price for what is clearly a cheap cooler.

People repairing old Dells (like me) usually just slap a new fan on the existing cooler. It's a fraction of the cost, and if necessary there are sub-$10 coolers like the stock heatsinks all over amazon/ebay. As I just said to Valatar, at €25 this is firmly into the "performance/premium" territory at 50% more expensive than mainstream, big-brand competition and 200% more expensive than the obvious fix for a broken old HSF.

It's worth pointing out that with Zen3, it's unlikely that it would overwhelm your cooler. The hotspot temperatures are much like a target temperature with Zen3. No matter how good or bad your cooling, it will aim to keep boosting voltages and clocks until the target temperature is reached. A weaker cooler will just prevent it from boosting as high, and only if you have sufficiently powerful cooling will you hit power limits (at stock settings) before reaching 90C.

The reason AMD officially addressed concerns over temperature is because even people with AIOs and $100 air coolers were hitting 85-90C at stock settings before attempting to overclock. Zen3's temperature and boosting algorithm is just different to Zen2, much like Intel's has been for a while. It will boost as high as it can, as hot as it can, for as long as it can and if you're not hitting 90C then it just means you're leaving potential performance on the table now.

I run mine quiet; In that balancing act between power, noise, and temperature I choose to restrict noise and let the new boost algorithm work out how to juggle power. If I wanted lower temps I would just set a manual PBO+ profile with a 75C temperature threshold.
15€ isn't the common price for a TX3, in France 27€ is about what you need to get one. Wich is also around the same price as the first gen pure rock slim in France. The snow man cooler is currently sold for 15€, but you need to wait a full month to receive one. Both the Hyper TX3 and the Pure rock can be considred bad buys since you can get a Hyper 212 evo for only 32€, wich isn't much considering the performance gap. But that's only if you get enough clearance to use a 120 cooler on the first place.
Posted on Reply
#24
Chrispy_
dyonoctis15€ isn't the common price for a TX3, in France 27€ is about what you need to get one. Wich is also around the same price as the first gen pure rock slim in France. The snow man cooler is currently sold for 15€, but you need to wait a full month to receive one. Both the Hyper TX3 and the Pure rock can be considred bad buys since you can get a Hyper 212 evo for only 32€, wich isn't much considering the performance gap. But that's only if you get enough clearance to use a 120 cooler on the first place.
I think the answer to that is "don't but the TX3 in France", then :)

There are cheap dual/triple heatpipe 92mm towers from Aerocool, Antec, Alpenfohn, Akasa, Arctic, Deepcool, Jonsbo, Raijintek Silverstone, Zalman. One of them must be available.

Hell, I found this comically-cheap cooler for £7.99 that's supposedly rated for 95W CPUs! That's not an endorsement, just something I found unusual :)

www.scan.co.uk/products/deepcool-ice-black-10-8mm-slim-heatpipe-cpu-cooler-with-92mm-fan-for-intel-amd
Posted on Reply
#25
dyonoctis
Chrispy_I think the answer to that is "don't but the TX3 in France", then :)

There are cheap dual/triple heatpipe 92mm towers from Aerocool, Antec, Alpenfohn, Akasa, Arctic, Deepcool, Jonsbo, Raijintek Silverstone, Zalman. One of them must be available.

Hell, I found this comically-cheap cooler for £7.99 that's supposedly rated for 95W CPUs! That's not an endorsement, just something I found unusual :)

www.scan.co.uk/products/deepcool-ice-black-10-8mm-slim-heatpipe-cpu-cooler-with-92mm-fan-for-intel-amd
Starting to look in other countries is becoming quite an hassle if dirt cheap is what you are after :D sometimes the increased shipping cost might end up negating the benefits, or the country you're buying from might not ship to your country at all. (Amazon Netherlands got the best price but don't ship to France)

But overall, in this age of mainstream 6/8 core pushed to their limits even at stocks, I feel like 92nm are becoming a niche product more about space constraints, than absolute low price. Even a 92nm noctua with 5 heatpipes is barely cutting it, so I can't imagine 3 heatpipes will be able to provide a confortable experience for anyone not using a low power sku
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