Monday, August 23rd 2021

Kingston Announces New Industrial microSD Cards

Kingston today made available its new Industrial microSD card lineup with a rated operating temperature of -40 °C to 85 °C, allowing normal operation even in "extreme desert heat and subzero conditions" based on the information provided by the company. The cards use TLC NAND in pSLC mode to provide transfer speeds of up to 100 MB/s, and are rated for endurance of up to 1920 TBW with 30K P/E cycles. There is a built-in feature set specific to endurance, performance and industrial needs. Kingston's Industrial microSD ships with a UHS-I SD adapter and is available in capacities from 8 GB-64 GB. Industrial features include bad block management, ECC engine, power failure protection, wear levelling, auto-refresh read distribution protection, dynamic data refresh, SiP - System in Package, garbage collection, and health monitoring.
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16 Comments on Kingston Announces New Industrial microSD Cards

#1
TheLostSwede
Sorry, but why does a memory card need FCC certification?
There's no radio transmitter built in to microSD cards, unless I've missed something.
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#2
kayjay010101
TheLostSwedeSorry, but why does a memory card need FCC certification?
There's no radio transmitter built in to microSD cards, unless I've missed something.
Where does it mention any FCC certification?
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#3
TheLostSwede
kayjay010101Where does it mention any FCC certification?
There's an FCC logo on the card, right after the A1 logo.
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#5
TheLostSwede
ChaitanyaApparently all electronic storage devices sold in US are under FCC regulations. This is Samsung listing compliance for their Flash/Drams.
www.samsung.com/semiconductor/support/regulatory-information/

transition.fcc.gov/bureaus/oet/info/documents/bulletins/oet62/oet62rev.pdf
I guess I've just never noticed it before. Never seen the FCC logo printed on the front of a microSD card before, but I guess they did it because it's an industrial grade product. Still, I can understand it on USB 3.x type devices, as they can be (and often are) a cause of EM interference if close to things like a Wi-Fi or Bluetooth dongle, even more so if connected via a cable. Had a WD portable USB 3.0 drive kill the ZigBee signal in a router we were testing at a previous job and that was using the supplied cable. I wonder how that passed FCC certification...
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#6
Ferrum Master
TheLostSwedeI guess I've just never noticed it before. Never seen the FCC logo printed on the front of a microSD card before, but I guess they did it because it's an industrial grade product. Still, I can understand it on USB 3.x type devices, as they can be (and often are) a cause of EM interference if close to things like a Wi-Fi or Bluetooth dongle, even more so if connected via a cable. Had a WD portable USB 3.0 drive kill the ZigBee signal in a router we were testing at a previous job and that was using the supplied cable. I wonder how that passed FCC certification...
It always cracks me up looking at the old errata how they wrapped up the drive :D Looks so "professional".

www.intel.com/content/dam/www/public/us/en/documents/white-papers/usb3-frequency-interference-papers.pdf
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#7
TheLostSwede
Ferrum MasterIt always cracks me up looking at the old errata how they wrapped up the drive :D Looks so "professional".

www.intel.com/content/dam/www/public/us/en/documents/white-papers/usb3-frequency-interference-papers.pdf
Ah, copper foil... It's not fool proof though, as in our case, it was actually the cable itself that caused the issue, as it acted like an antenna, causing really serious interference. Bought half a dozen different cables down the computer market and found that half of them were no good, as they caused the same problem. The weird thing was that price didn't matter, as some cheap ones were good, some were not and same for the more expensive ones. So if anyone's got problems with their 2.4GHz radios, make sure you check your USB 3.0 cables.

It was actually that document from Intel that helped us in part to figure out the problem.

Still surprised that microSD cards are expected to be able to cause EMI issues.
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#8
Readlight
These MicroSD cards die in Android mobilephones.
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#9
Ferrum Master
TheLostSwedeAh, copper foil... It's not fool proof though, as in our case, it was actually the cable itself that caused the issue, as it acted like an antenna, causing really serious interference. Bought half a dozen different cables down the computer market and found that half of them were no good, as they caused the same problem. The weird thing was that price didn't matter, as some cheap ones were good, some were not and same for the more expensive ones. So if anyone's got problems with their 2.4GHz radios, make sure you check your USB 3.0 cables.

It was actually that document from Intel that helped us in part to figure out the problem.

Still surprised that microSD cards are expected to be able to cause EMI issues.
I bet it has something to do with exact cable length, as the length matches some lambda/x steps for 2.4GHz. Cheaper cables simply didn't have proper shielding at all or had different(cheaper) termination at the connector ends.

The trace length might have the same issues in the SD Card itself, there are no effective shielding really possible. To be real... the FCC testing probably looks like powering the device on for smoke test and you're good, have the stamp.
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#10
RealKGB
I'm curious where this will be used.
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#11
Wirko
It's a funny situation when FCC certification is required for SD card but not for the adapter, probably because it has no active electronics inside (just a few innocent-looking antennas).
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#12
lexluthermiester
RealKGBI'm curious where this will be used.
Military field deployment applications come to mind..
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#13
Ferrum Master
lexluthermiesterMilitary field deployment applications come to mind..
BS as usual. If Military would ever rely on Kingston SD card, it would pose a national security risk.

These are meant for RaspberryPI style IoT devices.
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#14
lexluthermiester
Ferrum MasterBS as usual.
Keep your insults to yourself.
Ferrum MasterIf Military would ever rely on Kingston SD card, it would pose a national security risk.
It would be fine for software based data encryption in field ops.
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#15
Ferrum Master
lexluthermiesterKeep your insults to yourself.

It would be fine for software based data encryption in field ops.
This thing cant even get the contract for anything... it does not show shock durability, bend and moisture IP57 certification... only temperature. Serious mission critical usage for some sort of usual Kingston half baked product is out of question. The site shows almost nothing, no datasheet. Industrial? Yeah the markings say so... But I see no certificates.

Basically it is treated as product for civil segment, for those who takes the risk buying cheaper alternatives, nothing else.
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#16
lexluthermiester
Ferrum MasterThis thing cant even get the contract for anything... it does not show shock durability, bend and moisture IP57 certification... only temperature. Serious mission critical usage for some sort of usual Kingston half baked product is out of question. The site shows almost nothing, no datasheet. Industrial? Yeah the markings say so... But I see no certificates.

Basically it is treated as product for civil segment, for those who takes the risk buying cheaper alternatives, nothing else.
You've stated nothing to give merit to your above objection.
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