Sunday, October 10th 2021

Windows 11 TPM Requirement? Bypass it in 5 Minutes

So you have a $2,000 Core i7-6950X HEDT processor, which you thought would last forever, but Windows 11 Setup stands in your way with its steep system requirements that include TPM and Secure Boot. What do you do? With Windows 11, Microsoft introduced new requirements for compatible hardware, and these are purely software-only checks—nothing really requires it. Besides the much-talked about TPM 2.0 spec compatible hardware Trusted Platform Module as a system requirement, there's also new requirements for UEFI Boot, and installation on a GPT partitioned drive (no more MBR boot for Windows 11).

While these requirements do make some sense going forward, this walls off a lot of potential users, i.e. everyone without a TPM 2.0 add-on card, or those with processors older than 7th Gen Intel Core "Kaby Lake," or AMD Ryzen 2000 "Pinnacle Ridge" series. We have discovered a quick and easy way to defeat these checks during Windows 11 Setup, including for that nagging TPM 2.0, and Secure Boot. Here's a step by step guide for fresh installations.

Update Oct 7th: At the end of this article, which is focused on "clean installation", we added a method that lets you perform the upgrade of an existing installation to Windows 11, without any TPM. For this same scenario Microsoft offers a method that downgrades the TPM requirement from 2.0 to 1.2, our method works without any TPM and also relaxes other requirements, like memory size, UEFI and MBR.

Update Oct 10th: Improved the steps for the "upgrade" installation, to mention that updates to the updater should be turned off.
Step 1: Create the Registry Modification
After preparing your installation media (on another PC), open Notepad, paste the text below, save this file as "bypass.reg" on the bootable USB flash drive that's serving as installation media for Windows 11. You can also put just this file alone on a separate USB stick, the Windows installation environment will show it as additional drive.
Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\Setup\LabConfig]
"BypassTPMCheck"=dword:00000001
"BypassSecureBootCheck"=dword:00000001
"BypassRAMCheck"=dword:00000001
"BypassStorageCheck"=dword:00000001
"BypassCPUCheck"=dword:00000001
Copy and paste the text, including the "Window Registry Editor Version 5.00" part, it should look like in the screenshot below. Also, make sure to save as "bypass.reg" and not "bypass.reg.txt", which can happen if you use notepad and have "Show file extensions" turned off in Explorer (the default).
Step 2 Boot from that Installation Media USB Flash Drive
Now, simply boot from that USB flash drive, run Windows 11 Setup, and proceed until you hit the screen that says "This PC can't Run Windows 11."
Here, click on the "back" button of the wizard (top left of the window), which takes you back to the previous screen.

Step 3: Invoke a Command Prompt
Press "Shift+F10" on your keyboard. This opens a Command Prompt window. Type "regedit" and hit Enter.
Step 4: Get Registry Editor to Pick Up that Registry File You Made
With Registry Editor open, get it to import the "bypass.reg" file that's been sitting on your USB flash drive.

Step 5: Proceed with the Installation
That's it! Close all windows, and proceed with the installation.
What Happened Here
The Windows 11 installation media, much like that of Windows 10 and Windows 8 before it, is essentially a bootable "live CD" of a Windows environment, with a singular purpose of installing Windows, or attempting to Repair your Windows installation. Logically, this environment needs the tools for such repairs, including a Registry Editor and a Command Prompt. It also has its own Windows Registry, which tells it how to go about installing Windows. With this Registry mod, you're making the installer overlook multiple system requirements, meeting, including "TPM Check," which checks for a TPM 2.0 compliant module (or Firmware TPM), whether Secure Boot (and its dependency of a disabled CSM) are met.

If you need additional help, let us know in the comments,

Bypass TPM and other requirements for Update from within Windows
Start the Windows 11 update software, click "Change how setup downloads updates" and select "not right now", or disconnect from the Internet before pressing "Next". The reason is that there's now a new version of the updater that disables the "back" button on the "Unsupported Hardware" screen. Click "Next", after some checking, a screen "This PC doesn't currently meet Windows 11 system requirements" appears.
Now open the folder "C:\$WINDOWS.~BT\Sources" and look for the file "appraiserres.dll", delete the file. Make sure to delete the correct file, there's several "appraiser" files in that folder.
Return to the Windows 11 updater (no need to restart it), click "back", and "next", done.
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179 Comments on Windows 11 TPM Requirement? Bypass it in 5 Minutes

#76
ThrashZone
theFOoLExactly... All that new tech is just what to my mind :slap:
Hi,
Almost done with verifying 11's system image
Bad thing it's on my m.2 hell I don't use 10 that much at all anyway so guess I'll leave 11 on it for giggles until ms kills it for the other three 11 violations :D
Posted on Reply
#77
theFOoL
ThrashZoneHi,
Almost done with verifying 11's system image
Bad thing it's on my m.2 hell I don't use 10 that much at all anyway so guess I'll leave 11 on it for giggles until ms kills it for the other three 11 violations :D
I have Beta and Dev on separate drives so. Including WIN10LTSC on the slow but after things loaded useful laptop based IDE HDD since 10 uses thank God the same loader as 11

WIN10LTSC on IDE Laptop HDD
WIN10 on 120GB mSata
WINBETA on 240GB mSata
WiNDeV on 256GB mSata

As stated before I do this for FuN kinda "Testing"
Posted on Reply
#78
ThrashZone
theFOoLI have Beta and Dev on separate drives so. Including WIN10LTSC on the slow but after things loaded useful laptop based IDE HDD since 10 uses thank God the same loader as 11

WIN10LTSC on IDE Laptop HDD
WIN10 on 120GB mSata
WINBETA on 240GB mSata
WiNDeV on 256GB mSata

As stated before I do this for FuN kinda "Testing"
Hi,
I was at first just going to install 11 on my z490 build on sata ssd but I'm busy on it atm and for the next couple weeks so it will have to wait.
Posted on Reply
#79
theFOoL
ThrashZoneHi,
I was at first just going to install 11 on my z490 build on sata ssd but I'm busy on it atm and for the next couple weeks so it will have to wait.
Everyone here has money ha. Sadly not so here. Our internet is only 1.2MB DL

I can't work nor drive but at least I'm here. I buy used parts on eBay so
Posted on Reply
#80
R-T-B
theFOoLEveryone here has money ha. Sadly not so here. Our internet is only 1.2MB DL

I can't work nor drive but at least I'm here. I buy used parts on eBay so
Hey at least your haven' fun. Thats what makes a hobby worthwhile.
Posted on Reply
#81
Tauceti_5
The clean install method where it asks to copy the regedit lines onto notepad did not work for me AT ALL. i followed step by step carefully and went over it 3 times, after which i gave up, i dont know maybe im dumb, from what i gather, copy and paste, save as bypass.reg, move to usb drive and boot fr usb drive, go up until it says its not supported go back, hit shift+f10 and open regedit, import bypass.reg and thats it. Exactly what i did but it said the code was incorrect. So i gave up
Posted on Reply
#82
theFOoL
Tauceti_5The clean install method where it asks to copy the regedit lines onto notepad did not work for me AT ALL. i followed step by step carefully and went over it 3 times, after which i gave up, i dont know maybe im dumb, from what i gather, copy and paste, save as bypass.reg, move to usb drive and boot fr usb drive, go up until it says its not supported go back, hit shift+f10 and open regedit, import bypass.reg and thats it. Exactly what i did but it said the code was incorrect. So i gave up
Odd you did download my file right? Should be easy from there as you subscribed
Posted on Reply
#83
lexluthermiester
btarunrand installation on a GPT partitioned drive
It should be noted that with the use of the bypasses in the article above, Windows 11 can be installed to a non-UEFI system and to a drive formatted MBR. I am currently personally running 3 systems in this configuration.
DeathtoGnomesI wonder if this is a way to let MS backpedal with TPM.
Very likely! This gives them a way to allow users that do not meet their artificial limitations to bypass them completely, which allows them to save face.
ThrashZoneHi,
Still requires tpm 1.2 and ability to enable it
Or and operable tpm 1.2 chip or I suppose tpm 2.0 chip so scalpers rejoice.

Add image
I think you missed the point of the article..
CrAsHnBuRnXpIf Microsoft allows this and even themselves gives you a bypass option when upgrading from Windows 10, why dont they just nix the requirement all together?
Excellent question..
loracle706if you upgrade to w11 with non supported pc you ll get errors or incompatibility.
This is both flawed and incorrect. We do NOT need to spread disinformation.
ArkzMisleading title is misleading.
Not at all. The title of the article is perfectly stated!
Fierce GuppyIt's the lack of Windows 11 CPU driver support for anything older than an 8th gen Intel. Got secureboot, tpm 2.0, and a UEFI BIOS, but my Haswell CPU is deemed by MS to be incompatible. It is especially irritating when W11 works perfectly fine on a 12.5 year old PC with a 10 year old CPU.
That is total FUD on the part of microsoft. Windows 11 has been tested on CPU's as old as Core 2 Duo with no ill effect. Whatever you have, install using the bypass, enjoy!
Posted on Reply
#84
TheOne
This article was perfectly timed for me, I was planning on looking up the current popular methods of installing or upgrading on older hardware today when you posted this, and I just used the updated appraiserres.dll method with the ISO to install Windows 11 on a Haswell laptop with an i5-4200U, I don't know if it will update yet, but it installed without issue.
Posted on Reply
#85
theFOoL
TheOneThis article was perfectly timed for me, I was planning on looking up the current popular methods of installing or upgrading on older hardware today when you posted this, and I just used the updated appraiserres.dll method with the ISO to install Windows 11 on a Haswell laptop with an i5-4200U, I don't know if it will update yet, but it installed without issue.
I have understood how about the appraiserres.dll I mean I copied that from the WIN10 to a WiN11 but it didn't work for me so the reg file was next so
Posted on Reply
#86
TheOne
theFOoLI have understood how about the appraiserres.dll I mean I copied that from the WIN10 to a WiN11 but it didn't work for me so the reg file was next so
I meant I used the upgrade method and deleted the file after starting setup from the mounted ISO to upgrade the system.
Posted on Reply
#87
Arkz
lexluthermiesterNot at all. The title of the article is perfectly stated!
It is now it's been updated.
Posted on Reply
#88
Fierce Guppy
lexluthermiesterThat is total FUD on the part of microsoft. Windows 11 has been tested on CPU's as old as Core 2 Duo with no ill effect. Whatever you have, install using the bypass, enjoy!
I've known since after installing the "leaked" Windows 11 iso that the OS will run on anything Windows 10 runs on. I will not install the final release given the current circumstances, else it becomes another Windows 11 demo. The trial period is over. No more bypasses. I don't want anything nobbled in the area of security updates, bug fixes, and additional feature updates.
Posted on Reply
#89
lexluthermiester
Fierce GuppyI will not install the final release given the current circumstances
Why not? It works perfectly. I've now done 13 installs. No issues whatsoever.
Fierce GuppyI don't want anything nobbled in the area of security updates, bug fixes, and additional feature updates.
That's not happening. Several of the systems I've installed have already downloaded and installed a few updates. Those threats of blocked updates are total FUD as well it seems. Install on the system of your choice, update if you like, enjoy!
ArkzIt is now it's been updated.
I didn't see what it was before.
Posted on Reply
#90
kiddagoat
I had Windows 11 installed via Windows Update for a couple of weeks. At first, I wasn't having any issues. Then I was having issues with AMD software, specifically Ryzen Master stating that the driver wasn't installed properly.

I attempted a removal and reinstall, it didn't fix it. When I went to remove the AMD drivers with the AMD uninstall tool, and then reinstall them, my system could no longer boot into windows after the restart from uninstalling the AMD drivers. I continued to get a hard drive inaccessible error. I had to perform a clean install of Windows 10 to get my system back up and running.

I will be holding off on Windows 11 for the time being.
Posted on Reply
#91
lexluthermiester
kiddagoatI had Windows 11 installed via Windows Update for a couple of weeks. At first, I wasn't having any issues. Then I was having issues with AMD software, specifically Ryzen Master stating that the driver wasn't installed properly.

I attempted a removal and reinstall, it didn't fix it. When I went to remove the AMD drivers with the AMD uninstall tool, and then reinstall them, my system could no longer boot into windows after the restart from uninstalling the AMD drivers. I continued to get a hard drive inaccessible error. I had to perform a clean install of Windows 10 to get my system back up and running.

I will be holding off on Windows 11 for the time being.
Fresh install. If you're having those kinds of issues, it's time for a fresh install sometime soon anyway.
Posted on Reply
#92
W1zzard
Tauceti_5The clean install method where it asks to copy the regedit lines onto notepad did not work for me AT ALL. i followed step by step carefully and went over it 3 times, after which i gave up, i dont know maybe im dumb, from what i gather, copy and paste, save as bypass.reg, move to usb drive and boot fr usb drive, go up until it says its not supported go back, hit shift+f10 and open regedit, import bypass.reg and thats it. Exactly what i did but it said the code was incorrect. So i gave up
Those are the correct steps, could you take a photo of the error message with your phone?
Posted on Reply
#93
Arkz
lexluthermiesterWhy not? It works perfectly. I've now done 13 installs. No issues whatsoever.


That's not happening. Several of the systems I've installed have already downloaded and installed a few updates. Those threats of blocked updates are total FUD as well it seems. Install on the system of your choice, update if you like, enjoy!


I didn't see what it was before.
Sure you did. It's what's there now minus the update.
Tauceti_5The clean install method where it asks to copy the regedit lines onto notepad did not work for me AT ALL. i followed step by step carefully and went over it 3 times, after which i gave up, i dont know maybe im dumb, from what i gather, copy and paste, save as bypass.reg, move to usb drive and boot fr usb drive, go up until it says its not supported go back, hit shift+f10 and open regedit, import bypass.reg and thats it. Exactly what i did but it said the code was incorrect. So i gave up
Are you sure you saved it as bypass.reg and not bypass.reg.txt? You need to change to all files when saving or it will be a txt file.
Posted on Reply
#94
Tauceti_5
theFOoLOdd you did download my file right? Should be easy from there as you subscribed
W1zzardThose are the correct steps, could you take a photo of the error message with your phone?
I dont see any download file instructions, i was under the impression i only needed to copy and paste the code lines and thet was it.

I found a separate method by using a script through powershell. But it does require me to download a windowsmediacreationtool.bat that automatically modifies some system files/settings but i will use this method again as i would like to have a clean install without having to download 3rd party tools, as you can never be too safe, or at least modify those files myself (as shown here). I will take the picture once i get the error measage again.

One question before i try it again though, should i copy and paste exactly as it is shown (which i did) just copy and paste or should i get rid of the quotes around the title of each first new line of code, e.g.,

BypassTPMCheck=dword:00000001
Instead of
"BypassTPMCheck"=dword:00000001
Posted on Reply
#95
W1zzard
No, you should just paste the text, I've added this screenshot to the article with a little bit of extra text, in case that helps other visitors
Posted on Reply
#96
Tauceti_5
ArkzSure you did. It's what's there now minus the update.

Are you sure you saved it as bypass.reg and not bypass.reg.txt? You need to change to all files when saving or it will be a txt file.
Yep saved as bypass
W1zzardNo, you should just paste the text, I've added this screenshot to the article with a little bit of extra text, in case that helps other visitors
Ok i think i know what happened but will give it a try again, i deleted the "Windows Registry Editor Version 5.0" section, i thought it wasnt't needed. Do you think that was the issue?
Also i tried clean installing on a windows 10 drive, should i format the drive first and have deleted the partitions first?

I will try formatting the entire drive and deleting all partitions first.
ArkzSure you did. It's what's there now minus the update.

Are you sure you saved it as bypass.reg and not bypass.reg.txt? You need to change to all files when saving or it will be a txt file.
Yep saved as bypass.reg
Posted on Reply
#97
W1zzard
Tauceti_5i deleted the "Windows Registry Editor Version 5.0" section, i thought it wasnt't needed. Do you think that was the issue?
That is definitely the issue
Posted on Reply
#98
Tauceti_5
W1zzardThat is definitely the issue
Honestly, I always find a way to mess things up, definetly will try again but on my slow internet connection really dont wanna go through the whole 4 hours through microsoft's official install tool, how safe is it do you think using AveYo's Universal MediaCreationTool on github as described on tomshardware for a clean install.

www.google.com/amp/s/www.tomshardware.com/amp/how-to/bypass-windows-11-tpm-requirement

Creation tool on github:

gist.github.com/AveYo/c74dc774a8fb81a332b5d65613187b15#file-mediacreationtool-zip


It really got me thinking because using microsoft official tool, the boot drive was about 30 gb, and using the unofficial modified tool the flash drive is 4 gb. So looking up file size for usb boot drive for windows 11, its at least 5 gb, so my 30 gb boot drive really got me thinking.
Posted on Reply
#99
W1zzard
No experience with that tool.

No idea why you're getting 30 GB with Microsoft's MCT, the Windows 11 ISO file is 5.3 GB.

You should just be able to recreate the bypass.reg file on your USB stick, and you're good to go, no need to download everything again.
Posted on Reply
#100
lexluthermiester
ArkzSure you did. It's what's there now minus the update.
Wait, what?
Posted on Reply
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