Sunday, October 10th 2021

Windows 11 TPM Requirement? Bypass it in 5 Minutes

So you have a $2,000 Core i7-6950X HEDT processor, which you thought would last forever, but Windows 11 Setup stands in your way with its steep system requirements that include TPM and Secure Boot. What do you do? With Windows 11, Microsoft introduced new requirements for compatible hardware, and these are purely software-only checks—nothing really requires it. Besides the much-talked about TPM 2.0 spec compatible hardware Trusted Platform Module as a system requirement, there's also new requirements for UEFI Boot, and installation on a GPT partitioned drive (no more MBR boot for Windows 11).

While these requirements do make some sense going forward, this walls off a lot of potential users, i.e. everyone without a TPM 2.0 add-on card, or those with processors older than 7th Gen Intel Core "Kaby Lake," or AMD Ryzen 2000 "Pinnacle Ridge" series. We have discovered a quick and easy way to defeat these checks during Windows 11 Setup, including for that nagging TPM 2.0, and Secure Boot. Here's a step by step guide for fresh installations.

Update Oct 7th: At the end of this article, which is focused on "clean installation", we added a method that lets you perform the upgrade of an existing installation to Windows 11, without any TPM. For this same scenario Microsoft offers a method that downgrades the TPM requirement from 2.0 to 1.2, our method works without any TPM and also relaxes other requirements, like memory size, UEFI and MBR.

Update Oct 10th: Improved the steps for the "upgrade" installation, to mention that updates to the updater should be turned off.
Step 1: Create the Registry Modification
After preparing your installation media (on another PC), open Notepad, paste the text below, save this file as "bypass.reg" on the bootable USB flash drive that's serving as installation media for Windows 11. You can also put just this file alone on a separate USB stick, the Windows installation environment will show it as additional drive.
Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\Setup\LabConfig]
"BypassTPMCheck"=dword:00000001
"BypassSecureBootCheck"=dword:00000001
"BypassRAMCheck"=dword:00000001
"BypassStorageCheck"=dword:00000001
"BypassCPUCheck"=dword:00000001
Copy and paste the text, including the "Window Registry Editor Version 5.00" part, it should look like in the screenshot below. Also, make sure to save as "bypass.reg" and not "bypass.reg.txt", which can happen if you use notepad and have "Show file extensions" turned off in Explorer (the default).
Step 2 Boot from that Installation Media USB Flash Drive
Now, simply boot from that USB flash drive, run Windows 11 Setup, and proceed until you hit the screen that says "This PC can't Run Windows 11."
Here, click on the "back" button of the wizard (top left of the window), which takes you back to the previous screen.

Step 3: Invoke a Command Prompt
Press "Shift+F10" on your keyboard. This opens a Command Prompt window. Type "regedit" and hit Enter.
Step 4: Get Registry Editor to Pick Up that Registry File You Made
With Registry Editor open, get it to import the "bypass.reg" file that's been sitting on your USB flash drive.

Step 5: Proceed with the Installation
That's it! Close all windows, and proceed with the installation.
What Happened Here
The Windows 11 installation media, much like that of Windows 10 and Windows 8 before it, is essentially a bootable "live CD" of a Windows environment, with a singular purpose of installing Windows, or attempting to Repair your Windows installation. Logically, this environment needs the tools for such repairs, including a Registry Editor and a Command Prompt. It also has its own Windows Registry, which tells it how to go about installing Windows. With this Registry mod, you're making the installer overlook multiple system requirements, meeting, including "TPM Check," which checks for a TPM 2.0 compliant module (or Firmware TPM), whether Secure Boot (and its dependency of a disabled CSM) are met.

If you need additional help, let us know in the comments,

Bypass TPM and other requirements for Update from within Windows
Start the Windows 11 update software, click "Change how setup downloads updates" and select "not right now", or disconnect from the Internet before pressing "Next". The reason is that there's now a new version of the updater that disables the "back" button on the "Unsupported Hardware" screen. Click "Next", after some checking, a screen "This PC doesn't currently meet Windows 11 system requirements" appears.
Now open the folder "C:\$WINDOWS.~BT\Sources" and look for the file "appraiserres.dll", delete the file. Make sure to delete the correct file, there's several "appraiser" files in that folder.
Return to the Windows 11 updater (no need to restart it), click "back", and "next", done.
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179 Comments on Windows 11 TPM Requirement? Bypass it in 5 Minutes

#151
lexluthermiester
ThrashZoneExactly which part of 11 reminds you of win-7 lol
Are you trolling me or are you really asking for an explanation? It kinda feels like an effort at nit-picking & trolling..
Posted on Reply
#152
mechtech
That is a fairly limited amount of CPUs

The AMD 1k series ryzen was about march 2017, only 4.5 years old, and about same with Intel 7k series.
Posted on Reply
#153
lexluthermiester
mechtechThat is a fairly limited amount of CPUs

The AMD 1k series ryzen was about march 2017, only 4.5 years old, and about same with Intel 7k series.
Exactly.
Posted on Reply
#154
pdaliu
Thank you TechPowerUp. I've followed the 'appraiserres.dll deletion' method in the 'within windows' section. Win10 was perfectly upgraded to Win11 on my old machine without TPM at all. Personal settings and installed Apps were all there. The same is true for my Win 10 within VirtualBox, too. So far no issues and Windows Update (KB5005635) works!
Posted on Reply
#155
Mussels
Moderprator
Prima.VeraWait. Can we do this directly in Windows 10? I mean use this reg, and then start the Win11 setup directly from Win10, not from the boot USB flash.
I want just to upgrade to Win11, not a clean install.
Thank you.
Yup. You can only clean install from USB, upgrades must be done within the OS.
Posted on Reply
#156
arni-gx
well.... my pc is still not meet requirement for upgrade into win 11, because there is no secure boot and TPM 2.0......... by PC health check......
Posted on Reply
#157
lexluthermiester
arni-gxwell.... my pc is still not meet requirement for upgrade into win 11, because there is no secure boot and TPM 2.0......... by PC health check......
So use a bypass and ignore the health check nonsense..
Posted on Reply
#158
chrcoluk
lexluthermiesterBecause many of us HATE and LOATH the UI for Windows 10. 11 is a great improvement and hearkens back to the days of Windows 7. 11 is a return to good form for the UI of Windows and we will NOT let irritatingly artificial limitations and nonsense requirements stand in our way of a better computing experience. We will also not be forced to upgrade/replace perfectly capable PC's just because microsoft says so.

If you don't understand after that explanation, you likely never will, it's all good, continue to enjoy Windows 10. Not everyone sees things the same way..
Odd, I think the UI in 11 is nothing like 7.

Quick launch completely removed, start menu replaced with some smart phone, tablet like start box, forced large icon size and massively padded out icon spacing.

I think its more along the lines, its new, so I must use it, I like new stuff as its exciting. There may be changes that people specifically like though, but the UI is nothing like Windows 7, Windows 10 is closer to 7 than 11.
Posted on Reply
#159
lexluthermiester
chrcolukOdd, I think the UI in 11 is nothing like 7.
Perhaps you should look up the definition of the word "hearken"(see definition #3). In the context of my statement, I was implying that it is reminiscent of the quality and refinement that was contained in the experience Windows 7 had to offer. The UI for 11 has not only been remade to be visually more appealing with organic contours and stylings, but has also been reshaped to be more intuitive, with expanded fine-grained controls(which people are cluelessly complaining about) and intuitive menu/function associations. Granted, there are some imperfections and annoyances, but overall Windows 11 is an exceptional improvement over the laughable experience of Windows 8/8.1/10. I used Win10 LTSB & LTSC. Hated every minute of it. The only reason I used it was for DirectX12 gaming. Otherwise I would been perfectly happy continuing on with Windows 7.

I will never go back to the pathetic joke that was Windows after version 7. For me, it's 7 to 11 and everything in between is the rotten stuff that comes out of the south end of a northbound moose.
Posted on Reply
#160
chrcoluk
lexluthermiesterPerhaps you should look up the definition of the word "hearken"(see definition #3). In the context of my statement, I was implying that it is reminiscent of the quality and refinement that was contained in the experience Windows 7 had to offer. The UI for 11 has not only been remade to be visually more appealing with organic contours and stylings, but has also been reshaped to be more intuitive, with expanded fine-grained controls(which people are cluelessly complaining about) and intuitive menu/function associations. Granted, there are some imperfections and annoyances, but overall Windows 11 is an exceptional improvement over the laughable experience of Windows 8/8.1/10. I used Win10 LTSB & LTSC. Hated every minute of it. The only reason I used it was for DirectX12 gaming. Otherwise I would been perfectly happy continuing on with Windows 7.

I will never go back to the pathetic joke that was Windows after version 7. For me, it's 7 to 11 and everything in between is the rotten stuff that comes out of the south end of a northbound moose.
That was my point though, its not intuitive for a desktop user (in my opinion) it seems they designed it to be optimal for use on a tablet and then just forced that on desktop users as well.

Its like the windows 3.1 UI with its start window except this is restricted to one launch window only.

If you dislike the windows 10 UI, its implying you have not found windows UI intuitive from windows 95 onwards.

Hopefully startisback and openshell guys can figure something out to make it more pleasant for desktop users.

The UI actually reminds me of windows 8, where they removed the start menu in that as well.

Microsoft seem like a lost child, they introduce something, then they get bored of it and remove it or significantly change it.

Do we add live tiles? nah remove it, do we add desktop widgets? nah remove it, do we centre align window text? nah go back to left. But the one thing that proved popular and reliable for people was the start menu, if they just removed quick launch, I could have lived with that, as I could make my own virtual quick launch using mini tiles on the start menu. I ungroup icons, so e.g. if I have 5 notepad open they all have their own icon, as i can work faster that way, and on average I have 50-100 icons at once on my taskbar, with them been forced large icons and padded thats going to need lots of screen real estate.
Posted on Reply
#161
lexluthermiester
chrcolukThat was my point though, its not intuitive for a desktop user (in my opinion)
Maybe. But it is VERY intuitive for long time PC users who expect nitty-gritty controls and associations that make sense. Wisely, microsoft has decided to return to appealing to power users, IT professionals and enthusiasts instead of appealing to the common casual user. They have decided it better to cater to the leaders and opinion makers of the industry rather than catering to a user group that has no clue what a concise computing ethic and methodology is. And they have done all of this while still keeping Windows 11 easy to use for the most part.

The common user needs to improve their computing skills and knowledge. We the professionals and power users do NOT need to dumb things down for common users. Those who do not wish to answer the challenge have options, iOS & Android.

I'm not going to bother with the rest of your statement...
Posted on Reply
#162
chrcoluk
lexluthermiesterMaybe. But it is VERY intuitive for long time PC users who expect nitty-gritty controls and associations that make sense. Wisely, microsoft has decided to return to appealing to power users, IT professionals and enthusiasts instead of appealing to the common casual user. They have decided it better to cater to the leaders and opinion makers of the industry rather than catering to a user group that has no clue what a concise computing ethic and methodology is. And they have done all of this while still keeping Windows 11 easy to use for the most part.

The common user needs to improve their computing skills and knowledge. We the professionals and power users do NOT need to dumb things down for common users. Those who do not wish to answer the challenge have options, iOS & Android.

I'm not going to bother with the rest of your statement...
I think we going to have accept we are at complete opposites.

The UI changes to me look like they are catered to the casual user.

Large icons with lots of padding.
Optimised for people who do very little multi tasking.
Changes made to accommodate people who are used to using mobile devices so they are "less confused".

I expect there will be tools made or updates to openshell etc. to make things similar to what they were for the "power users"

Now your reply is written in a manner as if you talking down to me, like its authoritive, if you have any data showing that power users asked for these changes, then by all means provide it, but I do think your post is like mine, its just an opinion. I am not sure what an opinion maker for the industry is either, I hope you don't mean your typical tech journalist.

A developer can design a UI, but it doesn't mean that developer is right in how intuitive a UI is.

I think we should both leave it here, as we clearly not going to even be close to agreeing.
Posted on Reply
#163
lexluthermiester
chrcolukI think we going to have accept we are at complete opposites.
Oh, clearly. Yes. But why?...
chrcolukThe UI changes to me look like they are catered to the casual user.
Large icons with lots of padding.
Optimised for people who do very little multi tasking.
Changes made to accommodate people who are used to using mobile devices so they are "less confused".
And there it is. You seem to be judging based on appearances alone. I'm judging based on system level performances, easy access to system level management tools, system level utilities and a usability that appeals to someone who needs an overall efficient experience. I've been testing 11 since the first days of the 21996 leak and have conducted extensive tests on every build during the beta program to flesh out the functionality of the OS. I started a thread dedicated to that effort.
chrcolukI expect there will be tools made or updates to openshell etc. to make things similar to what they were for the "power users"
Sure, that'll happen and I look forward to it.
chrcolukNow your reply is written in a manner as if you talking down to me, like its authoritative
And you inspired that with your comment to me which seemed like it was equally condescending and belittling. Your choice of vocabulary and sentence structure was very telling. If you're going to disagree with someone and you don't wish to invoke an unpleasant response, take care not to word yourself in a way that makes them feel like you're attacking them.
chrcolukI think we should both leave it here, as we clearly not going to even be close to agreeing.
Agreed. That would be best.
Posted on Reply
#164
ThrashZone
Hi,
Used the upgrade process and still ms changed updates setting to activate it's torrent features to deliver updates to and from others on the internet instead of just local networks
So check you update delivery settings you might be surprised ms sure didn't save my settings from 10 :cool:
chrcolukOdd, I think the UI in 11 is nothing like 7.

Quick launch completely removed, start menu replaced with some smart phone, tablet like start box, forced large icon size and massively padded out icon spacing.

I think its more along the lines, its new, so I must use it, I like new stuff as its exciting. There may be changes that people specifically like though, but the UI is nothing like Windows 7, Windows 10 is closer to 7 than 11.
Indeed without the rounded corners it's win-10.2 funny anyone that hates 10 actually likes 11 lol
Posted on Reply
#165
wiak
or just use Rufus and download the iso with that and use the no tpm/secure boot option when creating the usb media
Posted on Reply
#166
ThrashZone
Hi,
Yep 3.16 beta2 has been seen to do this for clean installs
The release 3.16 not yet not sure why it would offer the same workarounds

rufus.ie/downloads/
Posted on Reply
#167
Mussels
Moderprator
Oh wow 3.16 lets you disable TPM from the creation?

That's awesome!

"Add Windows 11 "Extended" installation support (Disables TPM/Secure Boot/RAM requirements)"
Posted on Reply
#168
Arcdar
Fierce GuppyGone and did it.

As this PC has SecureBoot, UEFI, and TPM 2.0, I chose to install the OS using the Windows 11 Media Creation Tool. I still have not seen a nag prompt about my i7-5960X which is unexpected. The Windows 10 chipset drivers is a must to avoid seeing this:



Installing option features actually works unlike on the X58 machine. What worries me is there was only two updates queued.



Really? Is that all others with fully compatible PCs got?

Anyway, poor design decisions are apparent in this OS but it has been stable. All device drivers that worked in Windows 10 work in Windows 11. Even Asus AI Suite 3 works which is a goddamn miracle, but the Intel MEI driver must be installed first.

Got games to install...
Ah. Thanks for the update on it. Might try it on one of my dual-systems (x99 / x79), too :) ... sadly both of them DON'T have TPM2.0 but I'll try it out and see what happens - one of them even has a "chinese after market board" and thus I don't even think I could retrofit it with one. One of my trusty Asus dual-socket-boards died after many years and a new x99 asus board was quite hefty compared to 120€ for a chinese one with C6xx chipset to keep the system running :( . At least when I got the replacement part it was long before the "buy everything in china" hype and the "buy all x99 chips" hype so I still got it for a really really decent price :D (and yes, C6xx chipset, not one of the "x99" boards which then don't even have the x99 chip on it :D ) and could keep my two 2690v3's running which are more than enough still for everything I need it for :) .
Posted on Reply
#169
lexluthermiester
ThrashZoneIndeed without the rounded corners it's win-10.2 funny anyone that hates 10 actually likes 11 lol
So, are you trying to tell us all that you haven't used 11? Because no one can look at the Settings app and think there are no differences, unless they're on drugs or pulling the mickey. The Settings app alone is a solid reason to upgrade to 11 because of the much more intuitively arranged settings and the greater level of fine-grained controls. Then there is the easy access to the classic control panel and other admin type tools that have been added to and enhanced. Then when you add in all the visual refinements to the UI you end up with a total package that is far and away a better experience than what is on offer from 10. Windows 10.2 this is not. Anyone saying that needs to take a closer look.
MusselsOh wow 3.16 lets you disable TPM from the creation?
Nice! Giving that a test..
MusselsThat's awesome!
Hell yes!
ThrashZoneIndex of /downloads
This link now shows a final release.

EDIT; Just tried it. Not seeing any Windows 11 options using the microsoft direct ISO.
Am I missing something?
Posted on Reply
#170
ThrashZone
Hi,
3.16 portable works fine I got the beta2 just encase it wouldn't this was on my 9940x system on win-10 which already has win-11 on it too using the upgrade process here

Just point to the 11 iso with Select search and use Extended windows 11 installation

Might also notice it has windows to go

Posted on Reply
#171
gytaka
What is the solution if the machine meets all the requirements (TPM, safe boot, ram size) except that it has a KABY lake core i5 7400 processor?

With thanks for help!

(It's funny that the ms check-software describes the KABY lake core i5 7400 processor as 3 years old)
Posted on Reply
#172
W1zzard
gytakaWhat is the solution if the machine meets all the requirements (TPM, safe boot, ram size) except that it has a KABY lake core i5 7400 processor?

With thanks for help!

(It's funny that the ms check-software describes the KABY lake core i5 7400 processor as 3 years old)
Have you actually tried the updater? Delete the DLL file as described in the article, I think this bypasses all requirements
Posted on Reply
#173
gytaka
W1zzardHave you actually tried the updater? Delete the DLL file as described in the article, I think this bypasses all requirements
Okay, thank you. I'll try it, until then I only tried the windows update built-in application. I attach a picture, in the top right corner it tells me that the machine is not compatible for windows 11. (Funny: currently :rockout:)
Posted on Reply
#174
ThrashZone
Hi,
All you need to do is save this as a reg file from notepad and merge it then restart
Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\Setup\MoSetup]
"AllowUpgradesWithUnsupportedTPMOrCPU"=dword:00000001
Posted on Reply
#175
gytaka
ThrashZoneHi,
All you need to do is save this as a reg file from notepad and merge it then restart
Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\Setup\MoSetup]
"AllowUpgradesWithUnsupportedTPMOrCPU"=dword:00000001
Thank You for Your help!
Posted on Reply
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