Thursday, December 30th 2021

LG Display Unveils Next-Generation OLED TV Display, the OLED EX

LG Display, the world's leading innovator of display technologies, unveiled today its newest OLED TV technology OLED EX. The next-generation OLED EX display implements LG Display's deuterium and personalized algorithm-based EX Technology, which helps boost the innovative display's overall picture quality by enhancing brightness up to 30 percent compared to conventional OLED displays.

The OLED EX name is an acronym of "Evolution" and "eXperience", which represents the company's goal of providing customers with new experiences through its ever-evolving OLED technology. OLED displays are self-emissive by nature with their multiple millions of pixels emitting light independently without a separate backlight source. This distinctive characteristic lets OLED EX achieve the perfect black, rich and accurate color expression as well as an extremely fast response time.
Since 2013, the year it became the first to mass produce OLED TV displays, LG Display has been consistently improving its leading OLED technology. OLED EX is the result of the unparalleled knowledge and know-how the company has gained over nearly ten years of developing OLED displays, created to deliver the most lifelike images that transcend the limitations of a conventional display.

The EX Technology applied to the OLED EX displays combines deuterium compounds and personalized algorithms to enhance the stability and efficiency of the organic light emitting diode, thereby improving the overall display performance.

Thanks to EX Technology, OLED EX displays unlock new levels of picture accuracy and brightness to accurately deliver exquisite, realistic details and colors without any distortion - such as the reflection of sunlight on a river or each individual vein of a tree leaf.

Deuterium compounds are used to make highly efficient organic light-emitting diodes that emit stronger light. LG Display has successfully converted the hydrogen elements present in organic light emitting elements into stable deuterium and managed to apply the compounds to OLED EX for the first time.

Deuterium is twice as heavy as normal Hydrogen, and only a small amount exists in the natural world - as only one atom of Deuterium is found in about 6,000 ordinary Hydrogen atoms. LG Display has worked out how to extract deuterium from water and apply it to organic light-emitting devices. When stabilized, the Deuterium compounds allow the display to emit brighter light while maintaining high efficiency for a long time.

In addition, thanks to LG Display's very own 'personalized algorithm' based on machine learning technology, OLED EX is more in control of its own device. The algorithm predicts the usage amount of up to 33 million organic light-emitting diodes based on 8K OLED displays after learning individual viewing patterns, and precisely controls the display's energy input to more accurately express the details and colors of the video content being played.

LG Display has also upgraded its designs through the new OLED EX technology. By utilizing its innovative EX Technology, the company reduced bezel thickness from the original 6 mm to 4 mm based on 65-inch OLED displays. By reducing the bezel thickness by 30 percent compared to existing OLED displays, the OLED EX display creates an even more immersive viewing experience all the while delivering a sleeker and premium design.

LG Display plans to strengthen its leadership and product competitiveness in the large-sized OLED business by integrating OLED EX technology into all OLED TV displays manufactured at its OLED production plants in Paju, South Korea, and in Guangzhou, China, starting from the second quarter of 2022.

In 2013, LG Display's first year of starting mass-production of OLED TV displays, the company sold 200,000 units and by early last year recorded accumulated sales of 10 million units. In the two years since then, the company's accumulated sales have doubled to surpass 20 million units globally.

"Despite the global TV market experiencing a 12 percent decline this year, we still observed a 70 percent growth in OLED sales," said Dr. Oh Chang-ho, Executive Vice President & Head of the TV Business Unit at LG Display. "With our new OLED EX technology, we aim to provide even more innovative, high-end customer experiences through the evolution of our OLED technology, algorithms and designs."
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80 Comments on LG Display Unveils Next-Generation OLED TV Display, the OLED EX

#76
bug
R-T-BComing from a 600 nit peak, I'm guessing that much brightness hurts?

Not that it's used for more than like realistic momemtary explosions, but just curious. No brand war here, happy for you.
Peak for HDR is not meant to be sustained. There are actually two peaks defined: full-screen and local. Local is the higher one, as you can guess, and is what gets quoted most of the time.

When you go outside, you're routinely subjected to 10,000+ nits, so you're not so easily blinded. What makes high brightness uncomfortable for monitors is the short viewing distance and the long hours you spend looking at them.
Another aspect is the source material. If a movie is mastered for 1,000 nits, it will still look weird on a 2,000 nits monitor. Sadly, HDR in consumer space is only in its infancy. And the tech is behind. So it will take a while until thing s will settle down in this area.
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#77
R-T-B
bugPeak for HDR is not meant to be sustained. There are actually two peaks defined: full-screen and local. Local is the higher one, as you can guess, and is what gets quoted most of the time.
I'm aware of that.
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#78
Fluffmeister
efikkanFor most buyers, this will not be a concern at all. OLED is much more tolerant to uneven wear than plasma ever was (even the last gen Panasonics), to the point that it's really just the extreme edge cases where OLED is a poor choice.
Examples includes;
- TVs showing mostly a single news/sports channel with a "fixed" layout.
- PC users with the majority of screen time with a bright web browser covering only parts of the screen.
The latter is something I certainly do, as in right as we speak.

OLED is great, but I didn't want a display I had to babysit.
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#79
lynx29
bugNeat, I guess, but where do I get it? Netflix still has the original, afaik. (I was actually done with The Hobbit last night, gonna watch LotR again next.)
they only come in 4k blu ray discs off Amazon or walmart. shipped and sold by respective companies of course.

but yeah the LOTR 4k blu ray remasters sold out for a couple months when they first launched, they are highly rated, they went scene by scene enhancing each frame. from the reviews I read on it its the best remaster ever done.
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#80
bug
lynx29they only come in 4k blu ray discs off Amazon or walmart. shipped and sold by respective companies of course.

but yeah the LOTR 4k blu ray remasters sold out for a couple months when they first launched, they are highly rated, they went scene by scene enhancing each frame. from the reviews I read on it its the best remaster ever done.
Joke's on me anyway. Netflix doesn't have LotR at all, it's only on HBO Go/Max now. Only the FHD version, of course.
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