Friday, December 31st 2021

ASUS is Working on a DDR4 RAM Adapter for DDR5 Motherboards

With the current short supply and maybe more importantly, the rather insane pricing for DDR5 memory, ASUS is working on what could be called a quick fix for the problem, an adapter that would allow DDR5 motherboard owners to put DDR4 memory in their motherboards. It's not what we'd call an elegant solution at this point, but it's said it'll be refined before it's ready for retail—if it ever enters the market—since apparently the engineer that developed the adapter doesn't always get to see his projects hit retail, as from our understanding he's responsible for a lot of the more unusual products from ASUS' ROG brand.

That said, considering that a lot of high-end Z690 motherboards only support DDR5, this might be an interim solution that makes sense for a lot of people until availability of DDR5 improves. There's some complexity in making the adapter work though, as not only does it need its own power regulation, since DDR4 memory doesn't have onboard power conversion components unlike DDR5, but there's also the 2x 32-bit vs 64-bit bus to take into consideration as well. On top of this, the DRAM traces are obviously extended, which could lead to instabilities, which is why it's apparently only tested with one type of memory right now, which appears to be G-Skill's Tridentz Royal. A further limitation of the adapter is that it requires a special UEFI version to be installed that allows DDR4 memory to be used, but this might be the smallest issue in this "skunk works" project from ASUS' ROG team.

Sources: Bing on YouTube, via Anandtech
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104 Comments on ASUS is Working on a DDR4 RAM Adapter for DDR5 Motherboards

#101
TheLostSwede
lexluthermiesterIntel has no say in the matter. Vendors are free to match any hardware they wish with an Intel CPU. Intel even trying to prohibit specfic hardware pairing would be technically and literally illegal.
Of course they do. Again, as I also already mention, they can withhold their MDF funds, which for all but Asus, is a significant income source when it comes to motherboards. They can also stop selling chipsets to non compliant partners. Then what? They're under no obligation to sell their chipset to every Tom, Dick and Harry that shows up at their doorstep. You clearly don't have much insight into what goes on in this industry if you think Intel has no say over its partners.
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#102
lexluthermiester
TheLostSwedeYou clearly don't have much insight into what goes on in this industry if you think Intel has no say over its partners.
It's called fair-trade. Intel can not discriminate without cause. However, this line of discussion would be WAY off-topic. Just know that Intel can not discriminate without risking severe government penalties.
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#103
TheLostSwede
lexluthermiesterIt's called fair-trade. Intel can not discriminate without cause. However, this line of discussion would be WAY off-topic. Just know that Intel can not discriminate without risking severe government penalties.
But withholding MDF has nothing to do with fair or trade. It's an incentive that Intel can give or take away at a whim.
They can also limit supply to companies that aren't doing as they're being told.
All these things have happened in the past and Intel are likely to use those "tools" again in the future.
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#104
chrcoluk
The KingI don't see why board don't come with two slots for DDR4 and 2 slots for DDR5.
Basically if you using DDR4 then the DDR5 slot get disable and vice versa.

Then you would not have to make separate DDR4 and DDR5 versions of the same board.
$$?

I remember AGP transition, and still own the board, it was an AMD64 board that had both GPU slot tech's.
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