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NVIDIA CMP 170HX Mining Card Tested, Based on GA100 GPU SKU

NVIDIA's Crypto Mining (CMP) series of graphics cards are made to work only for one purpose: mining cryptocurrency coins. Hence, their functionality is somewhat limited, and they can not be used for gaming as regular GPUs can. Today, Linus Tech Tips got ahold of NVIDIA's CMP 170HX mining card, which is not listed on the company website. According to the source, the card runs on NVIDIA's GA100-105F GPU, a version based on the regular GA100 SXM design used in data-center applications. Unlike its bigger brother, the GA100-105F SKU is a cut-down design with 4480 CUDA cores and 8 GB of HBM2E memory. The complete design has 6912 cores and 40/80 GB HBM2E memory configurations.

As far as the reason for choosing 8 GB HBM2E memory goes, we know that the Ethereum DAG file is under 5 GB, so the 8 GB memory buffer is sufficient for mining any coin out there. It is powered by an 8-pin CPU power connector and draws about 250 Watts of power. It can be adjusted to 200 Watts while retaining the 165 MH/s hash rate for Ethereum. This reference design is manufactured by NVIDIA and has no active cooling, as it is meant to be cooled in high-density server racks. Only a colossal heatsink is attached, meaning that the cooling needs to come from a third party. As far as pricing is concerned, Linus managed to get this card for $5000, making it a costly mining option.
More images follow...

Xiaomi Announces CyberDog Powered by NVIDIA Jetson NX and Intel RealSense D450

Xiaomi today took another bold step in the exploration of future technology with its new bio-inspired quadruped robot - CyberDog. The launch of CyberDog is the culmination of Xiaomi's engineering prowess, condensed into an open source robot companion that developers can build upon.

CyberDog is Xiaomi's first foray into quadruped robotics for the open source community and developers worldwide. Robotics enthusiasts interested in CyberDog can compete or co-create with other like-minded Xiaomi Fans, together propelling the development and potential of quadruped robots.

NVIDIA "Ada Lovelace" Architecture Designed for N5, GeForce Returns to TSMC

NVIDIA's upcoming "Ada Lovelace" architecture, both for compute and graphics, is reportedly being designed for the 5 nanometer silicon fabrication node by TSMC. This marks NVIDIA's return to the Taiwanese foundry after its brief excursion to Samsung, with the 8 nm "Ampere" graphics architecture. "Ampere" compute dies continue to be built on TSMC 7 nm nodes. NVIDIA is looking to double the compute performance on its next-generation GPUs, with throughput approaching 70 TFLOP/s, from a numeric near-doubling in CUDA cores, generation-over-generation. These will also be run at clock speeds above 2 GHz. One can expect "Ada Lovelace" only by 2022, as TSMC N5 matures.

ASUS Announces GeForce RTX 3080 Ti and RTX 3070 Ti ROG Strix (LC) and TUF Graphics Cards

When NVIDIA's Ampere GPUs first stormed onto the scene, the GeForce RTX 3090 created an entirely new category of performance for the highest-resolution, highest-refresh-rate graphics and most demanding GPU compute tasks on the market. Now, the GeForce RTX 3080 Ti brings much of the power of that revolutionary graphics card to a wider audience. The RTX 3080 Ti's massive complement of CUDA, RT, and Tensor cores teams up with 12 GB of GDDR6X memory to create a potent package that's tailored for gamers first. And in the hotly contested midrange of the market, the RTX 3070 Ti brings more CUDA, RT, and Tensor cores to bear for mainstream systems.

ASUS has taken advantage of these new, more powerful GPUs to create custom designs that serve up high clock speeds, low temperatures, and whisper-quiet noise levels. The ROG Strix LC GeForce RTX 3080 Ti is our first Ampere card to use a hybrid liquid-cooled design for incredible performance potential, while ROG Strix and TUF Gaming versions of both the RTX 3080 Ti and RTX 3070 Ti deliver distinctly different takes on air cooling.

ZOTAC GAMING Unveils the GeForce RTX 3080 Ti and RTX 3070 Ti Series

ZOTAC Technology Limited, a global manufacturer of innovation, unveils two mighty additions to the ZOTAC GAMING GeForce RTX 30 Series GPU line-up-the GeForce RTX 3080 Ti and 3070 Ti Series. The all-new series are based on thea dvanced NVIDIA Ampere architecture with enhanced CUDA cores, Tensor cores, fast memory, and wide memory bandwidth that bring powerful gaming performance.

The RTX 3080 Ti Series feature the AMP Extreme Holo, AMP Holo, Trinity OC and Trinity models whereas the RTX 3070 Ti Series feature the AMP Extreme Holo, AMP Holo and Trinity. Powered by the NVIDIA Ampere architecture, the GeForce RTX 3080 Ti delivers an incredible leap in performance and fidelity with acclaimed features such as raytracing, NVIDIA DLSS performance-boosting AI, NVIDIA Reflex latency-reduction, NVIDIA Broadcast streaming features and additional memory that allows it to speed through the most popular creator applications as well.

NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3080 Ti GA102-225 GPU Pictured and Detailed

The launch of NVIDIA's upcoming GeForce RTX 3080 Ti graphics card is upon us. The number of rumors circulating the web is getting greater and we have just received die pictures of the GA102 silicon and the specification of the specific SKU. Sources over at VideoCardz have provided the website with the first die picture of GA102-225 silicon, which powers the NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3080 Ti graphics card. Pictured below, it doesn't appear much different compared to the GA102-300 SKU found inside the RTX 3090 card, with the only obvious differentiator being the SKU ID. However, the difference only appears under the hood, with the GA102-225 SKU having 10240 CUDA cores instead of 10752 CUDA cores found inside GA102-300 of RTX 3090.

Paired with 12 GB of GDDR6X memory on a 384-bit bus, the memory will have run around 19 Gbps speeds. That will result in a bandwidth of 912 GB/s. If you are wondering about the performance of the card, it should remain within a few percent of its bigger brother RTX 3090. We have the first leak showing Ethereum mining performance and the GA102-225 silicon achieved a mining hash rate of 118.9 Mh/s with some tuning. The memory was overclocked to 21.5 Gbps, while the GPU TDP was limited to 278 Watts. The leak shows that the card has managed to achieve a 1365 MHz base and 1665 MHz boost frequency. While we don't have the exact launch date, the supposed MSRP will be anywhere from $999 to $1099, assuming you can get it at all at any price.

NVIDIA Announces New Professional Ampere Graphics Cards

NVIDIA today announced a range of eight new NVIDIA Ampere architecture GPUs for next-generation laptops, desktops and servers that make it possible for professionals to work from wherever they choose, without sacrificing quality or time. For desktops, the new NVIDIA RTX A5000 and NVIDIA RTX A4000 GPUs feature new RT Cores, Tensor Cores and CUDA cores to speed AI, graphics and real-time rendering up to 2x faster than previous generations. For professionals on the go needing thin and light devices, the new NVIDIA RTX A2000, NVIDIA RTX A3000, RTX A4000 and RTX A5000 laptop GPUs deliver accelerated performance without compromising mobility.

For the data center, there are the new NVIDIA A10 GPU and A16 GPU. The A10 provides up to 2.5x the virtual workstation performance of the previous generation for designers and engineers, while the A16 GPU provides up to 2x user density with lower total cost of ownership and an enhanced virtual desktop infrastructure experience over the previous generation.

NVIDIA Announces Grace CPU for Giant AI and High Performance Computing Workloads

NVIDIA today announced its first data center CPU, an Arm-based processor that will deliver 10x the performance of today's fastest servers on the most complex AI and high performance computing workloads.

The result of more than 10,000 engineering years of work, the NVIDIA Grace CPU is designed to address the computing requirements for the world's most advanced applications—including natural language processing, recommender systems and AI supercomputing—that analyze enormous datasets requiring both ultra-fast compute performance and massive memory. It combines energy-efficient Arm CPU cores with an innovative low-power memory subsystem to deliver high performance with great efficiency.

NVIDIA RTX Voice Now Officially Supported on Non-RTX Cards

NVIDIA should probably start thinking about removing the RTX moniker from its RTX Voice suite, the (supposedly) AI-based audio noise-cancellation software the company launched about this time last year. At the time, NVIDIA announced it as an exclusive feature for their RTX GPUs, due to their AI-processing capabilities - and that led everyone to think RTX Voice employed the in-chip Tensor cores for leveraged AI operation. However, soon enough, mods started to appear that allowed GTX graphics cards - going back at least as much as the "hot-oven Fermi" in unofficial support - and that pointed towards a CUDA-based processing solution.

It appears that NVIDIA has now decided to officially extend support for the RTX Voice software to other, non-RTX graphics cards from the latest RTX 30-cards down to their 600-series (essentially any card supported under Nvidia's 410.18 driver or newer). So if you were hoping to leverage the software and wanted to do it officially, in a pre-RTX 20-series graphics card, with no patches - now you can. You can check out our RTX Voice review, where our very own Inle declared it to be "like magic".

NVIDIA Enables GPU Passthrough for Virtual Machines on Consumer-Grade GeForce GPUs

Editor's note: This is not a part of April Fools.

NVIDIA has separated professional users and regular gamers with the company's graphics card offering. There is a GeForce lineup of GPUs, which represents a gaming-oriented version and its main task is to simply play games, display graphics, and run some basic CUDA accelerated software. However, what would happen if you were to start experimenting with your GPU? For example, if you are running Linux, and you want to spin a virtual machine with Windows on it for gaming, you could just use your integrated GPU as the GeForce card doesn't allow for virtual GPU passthrough. For these purposes, NVIDIA has its professional graphics card lineup like Quadro and Tesla.

However, this specific feature is about to arrive in even the GeForce lineup offerings. NVIDIA has announced that the company is finally bringing the basic virtual machine passthrough functions to the gaming GPUs. While the feature is representing a step in the right direction, it is still limited. For example, the GeForce GPU passthrough supports only one virtual machine and SR-IOV feature is still not supported on GeForce. "If you want to enable multiple virtual machines to have direct access to a single GPU or want the GPU to be able to assign virtual functions to multiple virtual machines, you will need to use NVIDIA Tesla, Quadro, or RTX enterprise GPUs.", says the NVIDIA FAQ. GeForce virtualization, which is now still in beta, is supported on R465 or higher drivers.
The full content from NVIDIA's website is written below.

NVIDIA Unveils AI Enterprise Software Suite to Help Every Industry Unlock the Power of AI

NVIDIA today announced NVIDIA AI Enterprise, a comprehensive software suite of enterprise-grade AI tools and frameworks optimized, certified and supported by NVIDIA, exclusively with VMware vSphere 7 Update 2, separately announced today.

Through a first-of-its-kind industry collaboration to develop an AI-Ready Enterprise platform, NVIDIA teamed with VMware to virtualize AI workloads on VMware vSphere with NVIDIA AI Enterprise. The offering gives enterprises the software required to develop a broad range of AI solutions, such as advanced diagnostics in healthcare, smart factories for manufacturing, and fraud detection in financial services.
NVIDIA AI Enterprise Software Suite

NVIDIA Could Give a SUPER Overhaul to its GeForce RTX 3070 and RTX 3080 Graphics Cards

According to kopite7kimi, a famous leaker of information about NVIDIA graphics cards, we have some pieces of data about NVIDIA's plans to bring back its SUPER series of graphics cards. The SUPER graphics cards have first appeared in the GeForce RTX 2000 series "Turing" GPUs with GeForce RTX 2080 SUPER and RTX 2070 SUPER designs, after which RTX 2060 followed. Thanks to the source, we have information that NVIDIA plans to give its newest "Ampere" 3000 series of GeForce RTX GPUs a SUPER overhaul. Specifically, the company allegedly plans to introduce GeForce RTX 3070 SUPER and RTX 3080 SUPER SKUs to its offerings.

While there is no concrete information about the possible specifications of these cards, we can speculate that just like the previous SUPER upgrade, new cards would receive an upgrade in CUDA core count, and possibly a memory improvement. The last time a SUPER upgrade happened, NVIDIA just added more cores to the GPU and overclocked the GDDR6 memory and thus increased the memory bandwidth. We have to wait and see how the company plans to position these alleged cards and if we get them at all, so take this information with a grain of salt.
NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3080 SUPER Mock-Up
This is only a mock-up image and is not representing a real product.

NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3080 Ti Graphics Card Launch Postponed to February

In the past, we heard rumors about NVIDIA's upcoming GeForce RTX 3080 Ti graphics card. Being scheduled for January release, we were just a few weeks away from it. The new graphics card is designed to fill the gap between the RTX 3080 and higher-end RTX 3090, by offering the same GA102 die with the only difference being that the 3080 Ti is GA102-250 instead of GA102-300 die found RTX 3090. It allegedly has the same CUDA core count of 10496 cores, same 82 RT cores, 328 Tensor Cores, 328 Texture Units, and 112 ROPs. However, the RTX 3080 Ti is supposed to bring the GDDR6X memory capacity down to 20 GBs, instead of the 24 GB found on RTX 3090.

However, all of that is going to wait a little bit longer. Thanks to the information obtained by Igor Wallosek from Igor's Lab, we have data that NVIDIA's upcoming high-end GeForce RTX 3080 Ti graphics card is going to be postponed to February for release. Previous rumors suggested that we are going to get the card in January with the price tag of $999. That, however, has changed and NVIDIA allegedly postponed the launch to February. It is not yet clear what the cause behind it is, however, we speculate that the company can not meet the high demand that the new wave of GPUs is producing.

NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3080 Ti Landing in January at $999

According to the unknown manufacturer (AIB) based in Taiwan, NVIDIA is preparing to launch the new GeForce RTX 3000 series "Ampere" graphics card. As reported by the HKEPC website, the Santa Clara-based company is preparing to fill the gap between its top-end GeForce RTX 3090 and a bit slower RTX 3080 graphics card. The new product will be called GeForce RTX 3080 Ti. If you are wondering what the specification of the new graphics card will look like, you are in luck because the source has a few pieces of information. The new product will be based on GA102-250-KD-A1 GPU core, with a PG133-SKU15 PCB design scheme. The GPU will contain the same 10496 CUDA core configuration as the RTX 3090.

The only difference to the RTX 3090 will be a reduced GDDR6X amount of 20 GB. Along with the 20 GB of GDDR6X memory, the RTX 3080 Ti graphics cards will feature a 320-bit bus. The TGP of the card is limited to 320 Watts. The sources are reporting that the card will be launched sometime in January of 2021, and it will come at $999. This puts the price category of the RTX 3080 Ti in the same range as AMD's recently launched Radeon RX 6900 XT graphics card, so it will be interesting to see how these two products are competing.

NVIDIA and Atos Team Up to Build World's Fastest AI Supercomputer

NVIDIA today announced that the Italian inter-university consortium CINECA—one of the world's most important supercomputing centers—will use the company's accelerated computing platform to build the world's fastest AI supercomputer.

The new "Leonardo" system, built with Atos, is expected to deliver 10 exaflops of FP16 AI performance to enable advanced AI and HPC converged application use cases. Featuring nearly 14,000 NVIDIA Ampere architecture-based GPUs and NVIDIA Mellanox HDR 200 Gb/s InfiniBand networking, Leonardo will propel Italy as the global leader in AI and high performance computing research and innovation.

NVIDIA Unveils RTX A6000 "Ampere" Professional Graphics Card and A40 vGPU

NVIDIA today unveiled its RTX A6000 professional graphics card, the first professional visualization-segment product based on its "Ampere" graphics architecture. With this, the company appears to be deviating from the Quadro brand for the graphics card, while several software-side features retain the brand. The card is based on the same 8 nm "GA102" silicon as the GeForce RTX 3080, but configured differently. For starters, it gets a mammoth 48 GB of GDDR6 memory across the chip's 384-bit wide memory interface, along with ECC support.

The company did not reveal the GPU's CUDA core count, but mentioned that the card's typical board power is 300 W. The card also gets NVLink support, letting you pair up to two A6000 cards for explicit multi-GPU. It also supports GPU virtualization, including NVIDIA GRID, NVIDIA Quadro Virtual Data Center Workstation, and NVIDIA Virtual Compute Server. The card features a conventional lateral blower-type cooling solution, and its most fascinating aspect is its power input configuration, with just the one 8-pin EPS power input. We will update this story with more information as it trickles out.
Update 13:37 UTC: The company also unveiled the A40, a headless professional-visualization graphics card dedicated for virtual-GPU/cloud-GPU applications (deployments at scale in data-centers). The card has similar specs to the RTX A6000.

Update 13:42 UTC: NVIDIA website says that both the A40 and RTX A6000 a 4+4 pin EPS connector (and not 8-pin PCIe) for power input. An 8-pin EPS connector is capable of delivering up to 336 W (4x 7 A @ 12 V).

Folding @ Home Bakes in NVIDIA CUDA Support for Increased Performance

GPU Folders make up a huge fraction of the number-crunching power of Folding@home, enabling us to help projects like the COVID Moonshot open science drug discovery project evaluate thousands of molecules per week in their quest to produce a new low-cost patent-free therapy for COVID-19. The COVID Moonshot (@covid_moonshot) is using the number-crunching power of Folding@home to evaluate thousands of molecules per week, synthesizing hundreds of these molecules in their quest to develop a patent-free drug for COVID-19 that could be taken as a simple 2x/day pill.

As of today, your folding GPUs just got a big powerup! Thanks to NVIDIA engineers, our Folding@home GPU cores—based on the open source OpenMM toolkit—are now CUDA-enabled, allowing you to run GPU projects significantly faster. Typical GPUs will see 15-30% speedups on most Folding@home projects, drastically increasing both science throughput and points per day (PPD) these GPUs will generate.

Editor's Note:TechPowerUp features a strong community surrounding the Folding @ Home project. Remember to fold aggregated to the TPU team, if you so wish: we're currently 44# in the world, but have plans for complete world domination. You just have to input 50711 as your team ID. This is a way to donate efforts to cure various diseases affecting humanity that's at the reach of a few computer clicks - and the associated power cost with these computations.

NVIDIA RTX IO Detailed: GPU-assisted Storage Stack Here to Stay Until CPU Core-counts Rise

NVIDIA at its GeForce "Ampere" launch event announced the RTX IO technology. Storage is the weakest link in a modern computer, from a performance standpoint, and SSDs have had a transformational impact. With modern SSDs leveraging PCIe, consumer storage speeds are now bound to grow with each new PCIe generation doubling per-lane IO bandwidth. PCI-Express Gen 4 enables 64 Gbps bandwidth per direction on M.2 NVMe SSDs, AMD has already implemented it across its Ryzen desktop platform, Intel has it on its latest mobile platforms, and is expected to bring it to its desktop platform with "Rocket Lake." While more storage bandwidth is always welcome, the storage processing stack (the task of processing ones and zeroes to the physical layer), is still handled by the CPU. With rise in storage bandwidth, the IO load on the CPU rises proportionally, to a point where it can begin to impact performance. Microsoft sought to address this emerging challenge with the DirectStorage API, but NVIDIA wants to build on this.

According to tests by NVIDIA, reading uncompressed data from an SSD at 7 GB/s (typical max sequential read speeds of client-segment PCIe Gen 4 M.2 NVMe SSDs), requires the full utilization of two CPU cores. The OS typically spreads this workload across all available CPU cores/threads on a modern multi-core CPU. Things change dramatically when compressed data (such as game resources) are being read, in a gaming scenario, with a high number of IO requests. Modern AAA games have hundreds of thousands of individual resources crammed into compressed resource-pack files.

NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3090 and 3080 Specifications Leaked

Just ahead of the September launch, specifications of NVIDIA's upcoming RTX Ampere lineup have been leaked by industry sources over at VideoCardz. According to the website, three alleged GeForce SKUs are being launched in September - RTX 3090, RTX 3080, and RTX 3070. The new lineup features major improvements: 2nd generation ray-tracing cores and 3rd generation tensor cores made for AI and ML. When it comes to connectivity and I/O, the new cards use the PCIe 4.0 interface and have support for the latest display outputs like HDMI 2.1 and DisplayPort 1.4a.

The GeForce RTX 3090 comes with 24 GB of GDDR6X memory running on a 384-bit bus at 19.5 Gbps. This gives a memory bandwidth capacity of 936 GB/s. The card features the GA102-300 GPU with 5,248 CUDA cores running at 1695 MHz, and is rated for 350 W TGP (board power). While the Founders Edition cards will use NVIDIA's new 12-pin power connector, non-Founders Edition cards, from board partners like ASUS, MSI and Gigabyte, will be powered by two 8-pin connectors. Next up is specs for the GeForce RTX 3080, a GA102-200 based card that has 4,352 CUDA cores running at 1710 MHz, paired with 10 GB of GDDR6X memory running at 19 Gbps. The memory is connected with a 320-bit bus that achieves 760 GB/s bandwidth. The board is rated at 320 W and the card is designed to be powered by dual 8-pin connectors. And finally, there is the GeForce RTX 3070, which is built around the GA104-300 GPU with a yet unknown number of CUDA cores. We only know that it has the older non-X GDDR6 memory that runs at 16 Gbps speed on a 256-bit bus. The GPUs are supposedly manufactured on TSMC's 7 nm process, possibly the EUV variant.

NVIDIA Announces GTC 2020 Keynote to be Held on October 5-9

NVIDIA today announced that it will be hosting another GTC keynote for the coming month of October. To be held between October 5th and October 9th, the now announced keynote will bring updates to NVIDIA's products and technologies, as well as provide an opportunity for numerous computer science companies and individuals to take center stage on discussing new and upcoming technologies. More than 500 sessions will form the backbone of GTC, with seven separate programming streams running across North America, Europe, Israel, India, Taiwan, Japan and Korea - each with access to live demos, specialized content, local startups and sponsors.

This GTC keynote follows the May 2020 keynote where the world was presented to NVIDIA's Ampere-based GA100 accelerator. A gaming and consumer-oriented event is also taking place on September 1st, with expectations being set high for NVIDIA's next-generation of consumer graphics products. Although if recent rumors of a $2,000 RTX 3090 graphics card are anything to go by, not only expectations will be soaring by then.

Dynics Announces AI-enabled Vision System Powered by NVIDIA T4 Tensor Core GPU

Dynics, Inc., a U.S.-based manufacturer of industrial-grade computer hardware, visualization software, network security, network monitoring and software-defined networking solutions, today announced the XiT4 Inference Server, which helps industrial manufacturing companies increase their yield and provide more consistent manufacturing quality.

Artificial intelligence (AI) is increasingly being integrated into modern manufacturing to improve and automate processes, including 3D vision applications. The XiT4 Inference Server, powered by the NVIDIA T4 Tensor Core GPUs, is a fan-less hardware platform for AI, machine learning and 3D vision applications. AI technology is allowing manufacturers to increase efficiency and throughput of their production, while also providing more consistent quality due to higher accuracy and repeatability. Additional benefits are fewer false negatives (test escapes) and fewer false positives, which reduce downstream re-inspection needs, all leading to lower costs of manufacturing.

GALAX Designs a GeForce GTX 1650 "Ultra" with TU106 Silicon

NVIDIA board partners carving out GeForce RTX 20-series and GTX 16-series SKUs from ASICs they weren't originally based on, is becoming more common, but GALAX has taken things a step further. The company just launched a GeForce GTX 1650 (GDDR6) graphics card based on the "TU106" silicon (ASIC code: TU106-125-A1). The company carved a GTX 1650 out of this chip by disabling all of its RT cores, all its tensor cores, and a whopping 61% of its CUDA cores, along with proportionate reductions in TMU- and ROP counts. The memory bus width has been halved from 256-bit down to 128-bit.

The card, however, is only listed by the Chinese regional arm of GALAX. The card's marketing name is "GALAX GeForce GTX 1650 Ultra," with "Ultra" being a GALAX brand extension, and not an NVIDIA SKU (i.e. the GPU isn't called "GTX 1650 Ultra"). The GPU clock speeds for this card is identical to those of the original GTX 1650 that's based on TU117 - 1410 MHz base, 1590 MHz GPU Boost, and 12 Gbps (GDDR6-effective) memory.

Aetina Launches New Edge AI Computer Powered by the NVIDIA Jetson

Aetina Corp., a provider of high-performance GPGPU solutions, announced the new AN110-XNX edge AI computer leveraging the powerful capabilities of the NVIDIA Jetson Xavier NX, expanding its range of edge AI systems built on the Jetson platform for applications in smart transportation, factories, retail, healthcare, AIoT, robotics, and more.

The AN110-XNX combines the NVIDIA Jetson Xavier NX and Aetina AN110 carrier board in a compact form factor of 87.4 x 68.2 x 52 mm (with fan). AN110-XNX supports the MIPI CSI-2 interface for 1x4k or 2xFHD cameras to handle intensive AI workloads from ultra-high-resolution cameras to more accurate image analysis. It is as small as Aetina's AN110-NAO based on the NVIDIA Jetson Nano platform, but delivers more powerful AI computing via the new Jetson Xavier NX. With 384 CUDA cores, 48 Tensor Cores, and cloud-native capability the Jetson Xavier NX delivers up to 21 TOPS and is the ideal platform to accelerate AI applications. Bundled with the latest NVIDIA Jetpack 4.4 SDK, the energy-efficient module significantly expands the choices now available for developers and customers looking for embedded edge-computing options that demand increased performance to support AI workloads but are constrained by size, weight, power budget, or cost.

DirectX Coming to Linux...Sort of

Microsoft is preparing to add the DirectX API support to WSL (Windows Subsystem for Linux). The latest Windows Subsystem for Linux 2 will virtualize DirectX to Linux applications running on top of it. WSL is a translation layer for Linux apps to run on top of Windows. Unlike Wine, which attempts to translate Direct3D commands to OpenGL, what Microsoft is proposing is a real DirectX interface for apps in WSL, which can essentially talk to hardware (the host's kernel-mode GPU driver) directly.

To this effect, Microsoft introduced the Linux-edition of DXGkrnl, a new kernel-mode driver for Linux that talks to the DXGkrnl driver of the Windows host. With this, Microsoft is promising to expose the full Direct3D 12, DxCore, and DirectML. It will also serve as a conduit for third party APIs, such as OpenGL, OpenCL, Vulkan, and CUDA. Microsoft expects to release this feature-packed WSL out with WDDM 2.9 (so a future version of Windows 10).

AAEON Unveils AI and Edge Computing Solutions Powered by NVIDIA

AAEON, a leading developer of embedded AI and edge-computing solutions, today announced it is unveiling several new rugged embedded platforms—augmenting an already extensive lineup of AAEON AI edge-computing solutions powered by the NVIDIA Jetson platform. The new AAEON products provide key interfaces needed for edge computing in a small form factor, making it easier to build applications for all levels of users, from makers to more advanced developers for deployments in the field.

AAEON also introduced a new version of the popular BOXER-8120AI, now featuring the Jetson TX2 4 GB module, providing an efficient and cost-effective solution for AI edge computing with 256 CUDA cores delivering processing speeds up to 1.3 TFLOPS."Partnering with an AI and edge computing leader like NVIDIA supports our mission to deliver more diversified embedded products and solutions at higher quality standards," said Alex Hsueh, Senior Director of AAEON's System Platform Division. "These new offerings powered by the Jetson platform complement our existing lineup of rugged embedded products, providing an optimal combination of performance and price in a smaller form factor for customers to easily deploy across a full range of applications."
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