Monday, December 8th 2014

Century Micro Launches First Low-profile DDR4 DIMM

Japanese company Century Micro launched the world's first low-profile (half-height) DDR4 DIMM (model: CK4GX4-D4RE2133VL81). With a module height of just 1.87 cm, the 4 GB module uses DRAM chips made by SK Hynix, and offers JEDEC-specified DDR4-2133 MHz speeds, with 15-15-15 timings, and 1.2V DRAM voltage. It sells in 16 GB kits of four modules, which sells at 51,980 JPY (US $428), including taxes.

Source: Akiba PC Watch
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5 Comments on Century Micro Launches First Low-profile DDR4 DIMM

#1
jmcosta
whats the point of this? i mean the actual drr4
my samsung is low voltage with the same clock and 10cl :S
Posted on Reply
#2
Jorge
jmcosta said:
whats the point of this? i mean the actual drr4
my samsung is low voltage with the same clock and 10cl :S
It's low PROFILE (half-height), for restricted space areas like portable devices.
Posted on Reply
#3
Jack1n
jmcosta said:
whats the point of this? i mean the actual drr4
my samsung is low voltage with the same clock and 10cl :S
Your DDR3 cant pull off the same clocks/timings at the same voltage.
Posted on Reply
#4
Jorge
Jack1n said:
Your DDR3 cant pull off the same clocks/timings at the same voltage.
LV DDR3 however can run at essentially the same voltage as DDR4. Extensive testing with real applications shows that on desktop PCs using discrete CPUs that DDR3 RAM running above 1600 MHz. shows no tangible system performance gains because DDR3 @ 1600 MHz. is not a system bottleneck. DDR4 is primarily designed for servers but may find itself in more portables if priced right. If too expensive mfgs. will stick with LV DDR3.

FYI - Clock cycle time makes even less system performance difference than frequency so it's all meaningless once you exceed 1600 MHz.
Posted on Reply
#5
repman244
Jorge said:
LV DDR3 however can run at essentially the same voltage as DDR4. Extensive testing with real applications shows that on desktop PCs using discrete CPUs that DDR3 RAM running above 1600 MHz. shows no tangible system performance gains because DDR3 @ 1600 MHz. is not a system bottleneck. DDR4 is primarily designed for servers but may find itself in more portables if priced right. If too expensive mfgs. will stick with LV DDR3.

FYI - Clock cycle time makes even less system performance difference than frequency so it's all meaningless once you exceed 1600 MHz.
And LV DDR4 can run even lower.

We might as well stick with DDR1 then since "there is no benefit"....it's similar to that "640kB should be enough for anyone".

They won't stick to DDR3 because the CPU's won't have a DDR3 controller anymore.
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