Wednesday, September 27th 2017

AMD's Pinnacle Ridge Zen+ 12 nm CPUs to Launch on February 2018

A recent AMD roadmap leak showed the company's "tick", process-improved plans for 2018's Zen+, as well as its painter-imbued aspirations with Zen 2 in 2019. Now, there's some new info posted by DigiTimes that's being sourced straight from motherboard makers that points to the company's Pinnacle Ridge launch being set sometime in February 2018.

This information seems to have been delivered to the motherboard makers straight from AMD itself, as a heads-up for when they should be expecting to ramp up production of next-generation chipsets. Sources report that AMD will follow their Summit Ridge, Ryzen launch, with the initial release of Pinnacle 7 in February, followed by the mid-range Pinnacle 5 and entry-level Pinnacle 3 processors in March 2018. DigiTimes also reports that AMD is expecting to see its share of the desktop CPU market return to at least 30% in the first half of 2018 which, coeteris paribus, is more of a simple mathematical progression than clarvoyance.
The information is particularly important to motherboard makers because, according to DigiTimes, this should allow AMD's partners to gear-up for new motherboard launches with next-generation 400-series chipsets (still designed by ASMedia). X470 and B450-based motherboards are said to be the first to hit the store shelves, with ramp-up orders for the chipsets being expected to grow dramatically starting January 2018. We shouldn't have to worry about having to purchase new motherboards for the new and improved Ryzen processors, though - AMD did promise AM4 would last until 2020, where it's expected that relevant new technologies such as PCIe 4.0 and DDR5 will hit the market.

AMD is also expected to further launch a low-power version of Pinnacle processors in April 2018, with an enterprise version Pinnacle Pro following in May 2018. 2018 is gearing up to be a busy year for AMD as well.Source: DigiTimes
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39 Comments on AMD's Pinnacle Ridge Zen+ 12 nm CPUs to Launch on February 2018

#2
theoneandonlymrk
Im hoping these to have at least a similar uplift as the 8120 to 8350 and I am also interested more in what this means for Threadripper:).
Good times for pc enthusiasts though for sure, competition rocks.
Posted on Reply
#3
ppn
I'm waiting for the Pinnacle of the pinnacle then, which is 7 nm on February 2019, i can hold, i've seen "The onion movie Bates 9000". When it hits 4.5 then I'll be like, meh, "get it to 5.00", etc.
Posted on Reply
#4
Octopuss
Zen+ I might be interested in. Get the cock speeds up a little and we'll talk./
Posted on Reply
#6
Dj-ElectriC
I'm not asking for higher clocks, just better gaming performance.
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#7
deu
Dj-ElectriC said:
I'm not asking for higher clocks, just better gaming performance.
..Which is where you will get your better gaming performance from realisticly :)
Posted on Reply
#8
ShurikN
Dj-ElectriC said:
I'm not asking for higher clocks, just better gaming performance.
Better gaming performance requires better clocks, since most games, or should I say their engines, are optimized like shit. You might wanna take that up with game dev studios.
Posted on Reply
#9
BiggieShady
ShurikN said:
optimized like shit
Ah, if only zero hours spent optimizing were the biggest issue ... quite often you have the genuine miss use of the graphics api ... imagine lumberjack with motor saw that he uses without the fuel
Posted on Reply
#10
Durvelle27
Dj-ElectriC said:
I'm not asking for higher clocks, just better gaming performance.
But Ryzen is barely behind the king 7700K
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#11
Steevo
If this was Intel you would have to buy everything again.
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#12
Durvelle27
Steevo said:
If this was Intel you would have to buy everything again.
But it isn't, so we all good :cool:
Posted on Reply
#13
the54thvoid
Steevo said:
If this was Intel you would have to buy everything again.
This is why i gambled on Ryzen. Hoping I can improve my CPU by a reasonable margin on the same chipset.
Posted on Reply
#14
efikkan
ShurikN said:
Better gaming performance requires better clocks, since most games, or should I say their engines, are optimized like shit. You might wanna take that up with game dev studios.
Ryzen is not on par with Skylake in games running at the same clock, despite having more computational resources. This is due to an inferior prefetcher, which results in more cache and branch misses. We'll see when Zen2 arrives…
Posted on Reply
#15
R-T-B
efikkan said:
Ryzen is not on par with Skylake in games running at the same clock, despite having more computational resources. This is due to an inferior prefetcher, which results in more cache and branch misses. We'll see when Zen2 arrives…
Is there actaully a benchmark to back this up?

Just curious.
Posted on Reply
#16
Finners
Agree with most in here that just a little higher stock frequency and less fussy about RAM and I'll probably upgrade to. It doesn't help that RAM prices are so high atm that anyone like myself upgrading from a DDR3 platform is put off by the overall upgrade cost when Ryzen CPU's themselves are well priced.
Posted on Reply
#17
3rold
Octopuss said:
...Get the cock speeds up...
You dirty, dirty Octopuss ;)
Posted on Reply
#18
TheGuruStud
R-T-B said:
Is there actaully a benchmark to back this up?

Just curious.
Good luck lol. The deficits are from clock and the engine/game not knowing what to do with zen (assuming you're running fast ram).

I wonder what the excuses would be if everything was optimized for AMD for 9 years straight.
Posted on Reply
#19
theoneandonlymrk
TheGuruStud said:
Good luck lol. The deficits are from clock and the engine/game not knowing what to do with zen (assuming you're running fast ram).

I wonder what the excuses would be if everything was optimized for AMD for 9 years straight.
Their wouldn't need to be any and that's a foolish statement, as the constant common use of intel compilation software shows ,it certainly doesn't hurt.
Why lower the tone though tut.
Posted on Reply
#20
R-T-B
TheGuruStud said:
Good luck lol. The deficits are from clock and the engine/game not knowing what to do with zen (assuming you're running fast ram).

I wonder what the excuses would be if everything was optimized for AMD for 9 years straight.
I mean like, an overclocked 1800X and stock i7 6700k. That would eliminate the clock part of the equation as they basically clock similar.

No, it's not a "fair" benchmark. But I'm still curious.

I've done this in CPU-Z on my 1800X and it basically pans out equal. But that isn't "gaming."
Posted on Reply
#21
evernessince
efikkan said:
Ryzen is not on par with Skylake in games running at the same clock, despite having more computational resources. This is due to an inferior prefetcher, which results in more cache and branch misses. We'll see when Zen2 arrives…
Inferior prefetcher? No, more like everyone optimizing for the only choice on the market for the last 10 years, Intel. We've already seen Ryzen can beat the 7700k in gaming with a patch.
Posted on Reply
#22
Octopuss
3rold said:
You dirty, dirty Octopuss ;)
Oh LOL :D
Posted on Reply
#23
eidairaman1
The Exiled Airman
Good news in all but I'd like to see the epyc and tr sockets be the same physically and electrically.
Posted on Reply
#24
Vya Domus
evernessince said:
Inferior prefetcher? No, more like everyone optimizing for the only choice on the market for the last 10 years, Intel. We've already seen Ryzen can beat the 7700k in gaming with a patch.
Inferior prefetcher ... I wonder from where the hell did he pulled that out and based on what. It's been full of computer architecture geniuses around lately. :rolleyes:

A lot of what can be achieved with cache prefetching relies on how efficient are the compilers. It's been pretty obvious that no compiler was aware of Zen upon it's launch.
Posted on Reply
#25
johnspack
Just hurry the hell up already so I can buy a used 8 or 10 core cpu soon for a price that isn't stupid.
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