Monday, January 15th 2018

Marvell's Ready to launch QLC Controller Delivers 670K IOPS

QLC is the next big step in flash memory, with another bump in density increases and, crucially for consumers, revised, lower pricing for flash-based products that employ the new technology. We've already had a sneak peek at what QLC-based products can deliver - Intel's leaked SSD 660P employs QLC memory and is expected to deliver 1,800 MB/s in sequential read and up to 1,200 MB/s in sequential write speeds with 150,000 IOPS. Expect base drive capacities to increase - QLC being higher density would mean fewer NAND chips, but manufacturers want to keep the added performance of chip parallelism.

However, flash needs controllers to deliver its true potential, and Marvell has one up its sleeve. The new controller will eventually replace the NVMe 1.1 Eldora (88SS1093) used in some popular SSDs that are already shipping, such as Plextor's M9Pe, and the folks at Tom's hardware took a peek at it - running the current TLC memory, that is. The controller delivered over 670,000 IOPS and 3,500 MB/s in the demo, though there's no information on the density of the drive. But for those performance levels, it must've had a good amount of silicon. While not representative of final QLC memory performance of the controller, it's good to know that at least this part of the ecosystem is good to go. Now if only QLC was quick and hot off the presses, we could see a $100 512 GB SSD.
Source: Tom's Hardware
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4 Comments on Marvell's Ready to launch QLC Controller Delivers 670K IOPS

#1
RejZoR
And yet for some bizarre reason, companies still can't make cheap SATA drives that would max out with anything. You still have cheap but terrible SATA SSD's. Argh.
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#2
XiGMAKiD
The six million dollar questions are how good is the endurance and how long is the warranty? Because for me big speed is nothing without big endurance
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#3
lexluthermiester
XiGMAKiD said:
The six million dollar questions are how good is the endurance and how long is the warranty? Because for me big speed is nothing without big endurance
^ This, and hell yes. For some people speed is a secondary concern to durability, longevity and cost.
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#4
Xajel
I wonder when will they have the new SATA standard ? SATA SSD's needs some boost, M.2 are nice but we just started to get 3 slots in some motherboards and we can't use a cable with that we need that ugly U.2 port or the uglier SATA Express one...
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