Wednesday, February 15th 2017

AMD Provides Support for BIOS Update on 2nd Gen Ryzen - Boot Kit Available

The Socket AM4 platform is designed to be a long life, fully featured, scalable solution with support for multiple processors, with varying capabilities. Since the release of the AMD Socket AM4 motherboards in early 2017 with the AMD Ryzen desktop processor, there have been several BIOS updates made available through our motherboard partners. These updates not only provide improved system performance but also expand support for newer processors as they become available.

In February 2018, AMD began introduction of the new 2nd Gen Ryzen Desktop Processor with Radeon Vega Graphics. To enable support for this new processor, an updated BIOS is required. Due to the rapid pace of innovation, and strong demand for Ryzen Processors with Radeon Graphics, it may be possible that some users with an AMD Socket AM4 motherboard paired with a 2nd Generation Ryzen Desktop introduced in 2018, may experience an issue where the system does not boot up during initial setup.
The boot up issue likely means a system is running an early BIOS that does not have support for newer processors. This can be resolved by updating the motherboard BIOS to the latest version, which can be performed by using any processor supported with the currently installed BIOS. For a list of supported processors per BIOS version, please refer to the CPU Support List document available on the motherboard manufacturer's website. BIOS download and installation instructions are also found on their websites.

Workarounds
The following workarounds may be feasible for affected users, depending on their individual circumstances, and should be considered before applying the boot kit solution detailed below:

1: Update from Retailer
If the motherboard was purchased through a computer parts retailer, check with the retailer to see if they can facilitate the BIOS update at their location. There may be a charge for this, or it may be offered at no cost.

If you have access to a processor supported on the current installed BIOS, use it to perform the BIOS update, then swap out the processors when the update process is complete.

For a list of supported processors per BIOS version, please refer to the CPU Support List document available on the motherboard manufacturer's website. BIOS download and installation instructions are also found on their website.

If these workarounds are not feasible, please see the sections below for a solution.

2: Original Manufacturer Replacement
The Original Design Manufacturer (ODM) of the motherboard will support affected end users with an RMA exchange for a compatible motherboard, upon request. Affected end users are recommended to contact their local representative for the motherboard manufacturer to exchange their motherboard.

3: Boot Kit Solution
AMD will provide affected and qualified users a boot kit to perform the BIOS update on their motherboard.

This solution is offered through AMD warranty services and is available only for affected and qualified users of this specific boot up issue. This boot kit is free of charge.

To obtain the boot kit, please carefully follow these instructions:
  • Go to the AMD online warranty claims page: https://support.amd.com/en-us/warranty/rma
  • Fill in your full contact and product details
  • In the Problem Description field enter "Boot kit Required" (without quotes)
Source: AMD
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34 Comments on AMD Provides Support for BIOS Update on 2nd Gen Ryzen - Boot Kit Available

#1
Basard
So... update your BIOS before installing a CPU that your current BIOS doesn't support. Got it.
Posted on Reply
#2
Shamalamadingdong
Basard said:
So... update your BIOS before installing a CPU that your current BIOS doesn't support. Got it.
Well, that or buy a 400 series motherboard with your new purchase.
Posted on Reply
#3
RejZoR
Basard said:
So... update your BIOS before installing a CPU that your current BIOS doesn't support. Got it.
I've seen boards that can bootup without any CPU. You can flash them and all with an empty CPU socket. Not the usual OEM boards tho...
Posted on Reply
#4
sutyi
Basard said:
So... update your BIOS before installing a CPU that your current BIOS doesn't support. Got it.
Here in Hungary we have a check in option of "BIOS update" with the larger e-tailers / retrailers. So they flash the newest BIOS on your freshly ordered MB before delivery takes place and you are ready to go out of the box.

On the other hand there are Ryzen + VEGA APU stickers on MB boxes that are out of box 2200G & 2400G compatible.
Posted on Reply
#5
ZeDestructor
RejZoR said:
I've seen boards that can bootup without any CPU. You can flash them and all with an empty CPU socket. Not the usual OEM boards tho...
I've been told that Asus' USB flashback can do that. Never had any need to test it though, so I can't confirm
Posted on Reply
#6
IceScreamer
ZeDestructor said:
I've been told that Asus' USB flashback can do that. Never had any need to test it though, so I can't confirm
Yup, my old M5A97 EVO R2.0 does that. I updated the BIOS without any CPU, just the board, PSU and the BIOS file on a flash drive.
Posted on Reply
#7
Wastedslayer
ZeDestructor said:
I've been told that Asus' USB flashback can do that. Never had any need to test it though, so I can't confirm
Yep they do. Flashed an old Maximus Hero VIII without any memory or a CPU. Was way easier then I thought it would be.
Posted on Reply
#8
damric
My son is doing a $600 Ryzen G build so hopefully this goes smooth. It's nice that AMD is offering a kit. Hopefully it's available.
Posted on Reply
#9
ironwolf
CPU-less BIOS flashing is not on most boards, which bites. Lucky those with a board that has it. I have a spare dual core Bristol Ridge APU on order just for this occasion. I remember AMD hinting at this at least a week or two ago, was really hoping it was not true. This is the Kaby Lake on 100-series problem all over again. :(

Also would like to know what this AMD kit consists of.
Posted on Reply
#10
texas64
Humm... I still don't understand what's included in the boot kit. Anyone know?
Posted on Reply
#11
hojnikb
texas64 said:
Humm... I still don't understand what's included in the boot kit. Anyone know?
I'd guess a cheap bin of bristol ridge cpu and some instructions.
Posted on Reply
#12
eidairaman1
The Exiled Airman
Probably a low capacity thumb drive, instruction booklet, might be very specific to board maker too, some boards can flash without a cpu others require it. Maybe a very crippled lowest of low binned cpu that can just boot and post but not run an OS...
Posted on Reply
#13
texas64
Thanks, interesting approach. Has Intel ever done the same on their platforms?
Posted on Reply
#14
eidairaman1
The Exiled Airman
texas64 said:
Thanks, interesting approach. Has Intel ever done the same on their platforms?
Im just thinking possibilities, im unaware if intel has done it but most who buy parts from a brick and mortar either do the bios update at the shop/store or the buy a low end chip and resake it or keep it for other systems for troubleshooting.
Posted on Reply
#15
Aquinus
Resident Wat-man
ZeDestructor said:
I've been told that Asus' USB flashback can do that. Never had any need to test it though, so I can't confirm
I had to do this with my P9X79 Deluxe when I first got it. It's real nice to be able to update the BIOS when you need a newer BIOS to boot with your hardware.
Posted on Reply
#16
RealNeil
RejZoR said:
I've seen boards that can bootup without any CPU. You can flash them and all with an empty CPU socket.
I've done this twice with X99 Mainboards. It was weird doing it, but it worked without a hitch both times.
Posted on Reply
#17
kn00tcn
shouldnt there be an option4 to use a hardware flasher with a raspberry pi?
Posted on Reply
#18
ZeDestructor
kn00tcn said:
shouldnt there be an option4 to use a hardware flasher with a raspberry pi?
You can use an SPI flasher to flash the BIOS chip directly, but that way is a bit of a pain.. gotta decode the BIOS, figure out the pinout, pick the right coding, then flash the thing.
Posted on Reply
#19
kn00tcn
ZeDestructor said:
You can use an SPI flasher to flash the BIOS chip directly, but that way is a bit of a pain.. gotta decode the BIOS, figure out the pinout, pick the right coding, then flash the thing.
<div class="youtube-embed" data-id="zMRrNY0pxfM"><img src="https://i.ytimg.com/vi/zMRrNY0pxfM/hqdefault.jpg" /><div class="youtube-play"></div><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zMRrNY0pxfM" target="_blank" class="youtube-title"></a></div>

flasher is still useful for removing ME, or never worrying about having too old stock on any platform from anyone you know, you can flash for them

requesting RMA from AMD is also a pain
Posted on Reply
#20
ZeDestructor
kn00tcn said:
<div class="youtube-embed" data-id="zMRrNY0pxfM"><img src="https://i.ytimg.com/vi/zMRrNY0pxfM/hqdefault.jpg" /><div class="youtube-play"></div><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zMRrNY0pxfM" target="_blank" class="youtube-title"></a></div>

flasher is still useful for removing ME, or never worrying about having too old stock on any platform from anyone you know, you can flash for them

requesting RMA from AMD is also a pain
Yeah, but you can't expect the average enthusiast to have an SPI flasher lying around, let alone an average user...
Posted on Reply
#21
kn00tcn
ZeDestructor said:
Yeah, but you can't expect the average enthusiast to have an SPI flasher lying around, let alone an average user...
for sure, i only meant they have been talked about a lot in the past year due to intel's crap so an increase of usage has happened, a smaller amount of people with them can handle multiple people they know in their area, or if some modern tinkerer library has them available, or simply reminding someone that has or knows where to get one that it's an option as they may not realize at the time, etc
Posted on Reply
#22
eidairaman1
The Exiled Airman
kn00tcn said:
for sure, i only meant they have been talked about a lot in the past year due to intel's crap so an increase of usage has happened, a smaller amount of people with them can handle multiple people they know in their area, or if some modern tinkerer library has them available, or simply reminding someone that has or knows where to get one that it's an option as they may not realize at the time, etc
Its a tool that is hardly used but is needed in a toolkit.
Posted on Reply
#23
qubit
Overclocked quantum bit
I'd like to know what this bootkit actually is and does. Anyone know?
Posted on Reply
#24
kruk
qubit said:
I'd like to know what this bootkit actually is and does. Anyone know?
As per Arstechnica: The boot kit contains an AM4 compatible dual core Bristol Ridge A6-9500.
Posted on Reply
#25
eidairaman1
The Exiled Airman
kruk said:
As per Arstechnica: The boot kit contains an AM4 compatible dual core Bristol Ridge A6-9500.
Pretty good presumption on some of our parts...
Posted on Reply
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