Thursday, February 15th 2018

AMD Provides Support for BIOS Update on 2nd Gen Ryzen - Boot Kit Available

The Socket AM4 platform is designed to be a long life, fully featured, scalable solution with support for multiple processors, with varying capabilities. Since the release of the AMD Socket AM4 motherboards in early 2017 with the AMD Ryzen desktop processor, there have been several BIOS updates made available through our motherboard partners. These updates not only provide improved system performance but also expand support for newer processors as they become available.

In February 2018, AMD began introduction of the new 2nd Gen Ryzen Desktop Processor with Radeon Vega Graphics. To enable support for this new processor, an updated BIOS is required. Due to the rapid pace of innovation, and strong demand for Ryzen Processors with Radeon Graphics, it may be possible that some users with an AMD Socket AM4 motherboard paired with a 2nd Generation Ryzen Desktop introduced in 2018, may experience an issue where the system does not boot up during initial setup.
The boot up issue likely means a system is running an early BIOS that does not have support for newer processors. This can be resolved by updating the motherboard BIOS to the latest version, which can be performed by using any processor supported with the currently installed BIOS. For a list of supported processors per BIOS version, please refer to the CPU Support List document available on the motherboard manufacturer's website. BIOS download and installation instructions are also found on their websites.

Workarounds
The following workarounds may be feasible for affected users, depending on their individual circumstances, and should be considered before applying the boot kit solution detailed below:

1: Update from Retailer
If the motherboard was purchased through a computer parts retailer, check with the retailer to see if they can facilitate the BIOS update at their location. There may be a charge for this, or it may be offered at no cost.

If you have access to a processor supported on the current installed BIOS, use it to perform the BIOS update, then swap out the processors when the update process is complete.

For a list of supported processors per BIOS version, please refer to the CPU Support List document available on the motherboard manufacturer's website. BIOS download and installation instructions are also found on their website.

If these workarounds are not feasible, please see the sections below for a solution.

2: Original Manufacturer Replacement
The Original Design Manufacturer (ODM) of the motherboard will support affected end users with an RMA exchange for a compatible motherboard, upon request. Affected end users are recommended to contact their local representative for the motherboard manufacturer to exchange their motherboard.

3: Boot Kit Solution
AMD will provide affected and qualified users a boot kit to perform the BIOS update on their motherboard.

This solution is offered through AMD warranty services and is available only for affected and qualified users of this specific boot up issue. This boot kit is free of charge.

To obtain the boot kit, please carefully follow these instructions:
  • Go to the AMD online warranty claims page: https://support.amd.com/en-us/warranty/rma
  • Fill in your full contact and product details
  • In the Problem Description field enter "Boot kit Required" (without quotes)
Source: AMD
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34 Comments on AMD Provides Support for BIOS Update on 2nd Gen Ryzen - Boot Kit Available

#1
qubit
Overclocked quantum bit
kruk said:
As per Arstechnica: The boot kit contains an AM4 compatible dual core Bristol Ridge A6-9500.
Thanks, I thought it had to be something like that. That word "kit" though implies that there's more than one component to this, but it seems that it's just the CPU that's sent out.

I would have thought it wouldn't have been too much trouble to make all future CPUs compatible enough with a socket/chipset that it will at least boot and run well enough for a BIOS flash when an incompatible BIOS is found, if not a full Windows boot in some sort of safe/crippled mode. If not that, then I don't think it's unreasonable to expect all mobos to allow a BIOS flash without a CPU to get over this problem. This comment applies to AMD and Intel.
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#2
hojnikb
ZeDestructor said:
You can use an SPI flasher to flash the BIOS chip directly, but that way is a bit of a pain.. gotta decode the BIOS, figure out the pinout, pick the right coding, then flash the thing.
there are clamps for bios chips and pinout is standard for SPI
Posted on Reply
#3
ZeDestructor
hojnikb said:
there are clamps for bios chips and pinout is standard for SPI
Still gotta pick the right clamp...
Posted on Reply
#4
ironwolf
qubit said:
Thanks, I thought it had to be something like that. That word "kit" though implies that there's more than one component to this, but it seems that it's just the CPU that's sent out.

I would have thought it wouldn't have been too much trouble to make all future CPUs compatible enough with a socket/chipset that it will at least boot and run well enough for a BIOS flash when an incompatible BIOS is found, if not a full Windows boot in some sort of safe/crippled mode. If not that, then I don't think it's unreasonable to expect all mobos to allow a BIOS flash without a CPU to get over this problem. This comment applies to AMD and Intel.
The email seems to indicate CPU + heastink/fan is sent out along with you getting emailed a pre-paid return label. Someone on the forums over there posted this copy/paste of the instructions they received:


our boot kit request has been approved and we are processing this through our standard RMA system.

You should have received the RMA number and confirmation details in a separate email by now.

Please note: Your RMA will be for your boot kit model number and not for your Ryzen APU.
Once you have received the boot kit, please install the boot kit processor onto your motherboard and boot up the system to begin the BIOS update procedure.
The latest BIOS is available for download from the motherboard manufacturer’s website. You may save the BIOS onto a USB flash drive using another PC or download directly onto the current system after the operating system has been successfully installed and configured.
With the latest BIOS file downloaded and saved, please follow the motherboard BIOS update instructions. These instructions are available online from the manufacturer’s website or found in the user manual.
After the BIOS update is complete, please swap out the boot kit processor with your new Ryzen APU and confirm that the system is now booting up successfully.
Once you have confirmed that your Ryzen APU is working on your motherboard, please send your boot kit back to AMD following the instructions below.

Book Kit Return Shipping Instructions
Please securely package the boot kit CPU in the box it came in with the RMA number and return shipping address clearly written on the outside of the box.
Note: Please keep the heatsink and fan as it is not required to send this back to AMD but be advised that this heatsink is not compatible with your Ryzen APU.

The shipping address is:
AMD/ ModusLink Global Solution Center
11010 NW 92nd Terrace
Miami, Florida 33178
Tel: 1-305-803-0916


I am currently arranging a pre-paid FedEx return label to return your CPU back to AMD free of charge - It will be emailed to you shortly.
Please print the label and attach it to the return package and arrange pick up or drop off through your local FedEx service center.

I will keep this ticket open for another 10 days so you can provide an update. If you need to update the ticket after 10 days, please submit a new request via http://support.amd.com/en-us/contact/email-form

In order to update this service request, please respond, leaving the service request reference intact.

Best regards,

Shibu

AMD Global Customer Care
Posted on Reply
#5
damric
qubit said:
Thanks, I thought it had to be something like that. That word "kit" though implies that there's more than one component to this, but it seems that it's just the CPU that's sent out.

I would have thought it wouldn't have been too much trouble to make all future CPUs compatible enough with a socket/chipset that it will at least boot and run well enough for a BIOS flash when an incompatible BIOS is found, if not a full Windows boot in some sort of safe/crippled mode. If not that, then I don't think it's unreasonable to expect all mobos to allow a BIOS flash without a CPU to get over this problem. This comment applies to AMD and Intel.
I never had upgrade trouble with the AM2 AM2+ AM3 AM3+ platforms, but did have problems with FM2 FM2+ upgrades where a flash was needed. With the older platforms it would boot fine but just say unknown cpu model in place of the name.
Posted on Reply
#6
kn00tcn
odd, ars says the heatsink isnt required to be returned & that it's not compatible with AM4... but also, if you're building, dont you already have a heatsink? unless you're flashing on behalf of someone else, why would you need to flash before having a heatsink/unsupported cpu ready?
Posted on Reply
#7
qubit
Overclocked quantum bit
damric said:
I never had upgrade trouble with the AM2 AM2+ AM3 AM3+ platforms, but did have problems with FM2 FM2+ upgrades where a flash was needed. With the older platforms it would boot fine but just say unknown cpu model in place of the name.
Unknown CPU would be a perfectly acceptable situation until the BIOS was updated.

kn00tcn said:
odd, ars says the heatsink isnt required to be returned & that it's not compatible with AM4... but also, if you're building, dont you already have a heatsink? unless you're flashing on behalf of someone else, why would you need to flash before having a heatsink/unsupported cpu ready?
I suspect that AMD are just covering their bases with this one. Maybe they're covering for the potential muppet who installs the temporary CPU without the heatsink and burns it up...
Posted on Reply
#8
kn00tcn
qubit said:
installs the temporary CPU without the heatsink and burns it up...
challenge accepted! how hot can it possibly get? it's not being loaded & will throttle itself... or at least... hope it does... has anyone ever proven if cpus/gpus require drivers or an OS to use their power states? we know nvidia gpus boot at idle clocks but that's about it
Posted on Reply
#9
ZeDestructor
kn00tcn said:
challenge accepted! how hot can it possibly get? it's not being loaded & will throttle itself... or at least... hope it does... has anyone ever proven if cpus/gpus require drivers or an OS to use their power states? we know nvidia gpus boot at idle clocks but that's about it
nV GPUs will basically not do anything until you load real firmware on them. This is the source of quite a lot of moaning every time nV launches something new and shiny (said blobs being available only in the closed drivers). I believe AMD and Intel are quite similar, though easier to get their binary blobs since both just publish their blobs freely.
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