Wednesday, November 7th 2018

It Can't Run Crysis: Radeon Instinct MI60 Only Supports Linux

AMD recently announced the Radeon Instinct MI60, a GPU-based data-center compute processor with hardware virtualization features. It takes the crown for "the world's first 7 nm GPU." The company also put out specifications of the "Vega 20" GPU it's based on: 4,096 stream processors, 4096-bit HBM2 memory interface, 1800 MHz engine clock-speed, 1 TB/s memory bandwidth, 7.4 TFLOP/s peak double-precision (FP64) performance, and the works. Here's the kicker: the company isn't launching this accelerator with Windows support. At launch, AMD is only releasing x86-64 Linux drivers, with API support for OpenGL 4.6, Vulkan 1.0, and OpenCL 2.0, along with AMD's ROCm open ecosystem. The lack of display connector already disqualifies this card for most workstation applications, but with the lack of Windows support, it is also the most expensive graphics card that "can't run Crysis." AMD could release Radeon Pro branded graphics cards based on "Vega 20," which will ship with Windows and MacOS drivers.
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29 Comments on It Can't Run Crysis: Radeon Instinct MI60 Only Supports Linux

#1
Kamgusta
You can play Crysis in Linux using Wine.
So, yeah, it can play Crysis, after all.
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#2
Patriot
Supports hardware virtualization, can totally play crysis
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#3
lexluthermiester
@btarunr
You had to know the flack you were gonna get with this article. And to be fair, there are many ways to run Windows based software on Linux. And to suppose the Windows support isn't incoming might be a tad naive. Delayed, maybe, but non-existent? I'll believe that when AMD confirms it.
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#4
Patriot
"lexluthermiester said:
@btarunr
You had to know the flack you were gonna get with this article. And to be fair, there are many ways to run Windows based software on Linux. And to suppose the Windows support isn't incoming might be a tad naive. Delayed, maybe, but non-existent? I'll believe that when AMD confirms it.
You mean the prorender cards based on it they showed earlier in the year? Yeah, vega 7nm has windows support, for the instinct60/50 it doesn't much matter.
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#5
qubit
Overclocked quantum bit
Are AMD expecting this card to only be used in supercomputers, which normally don't run Windows? Seems a risky move to make to cut out Windows support.
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#6
Vayra86
Gaming and datacenter product in the same article.

Was that really necessary? It's really starting to become quite annoying, these silly references with AMD GPUs. And they don't help the utter state of confusion for some around Vega 20 either.
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#7
m4dn355
TPU and fellow members should put the Crysis reference to rest. Amen
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#8
bug
"qubit said:
Are AMD expecting this card to only be used in supercomputers, which normally don't run Windows? Seems a risky move to make to cut out Windows support.
Are you implying AMD don't know their customers?
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#9
HTC
"qubit said:
Are AMD expecting this card to only be used in supercomputers, which normally don't run Windows? Seems a risky move to make to cut out Windows support.
The problem with Windows is the licensing costs because Windows does it on a per certain-amount-of-cores basis and Linux does not: it's that simple.

In the supercomputer world, you generally have thousands of CPUs and / or GPUs and the licensing costs are staggering in these situations if using Windows.
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#10
bug
"HTC said:
The problem with Windows is the licensing costs because Windows does it on a per certain-amount-of-cores basis and Linux does not: it's that simple.

In the supercomputer world, you generally have thousands of CPUs and / or GPUs and the licensing costs are staggering in these situations if using Windows.
Not to mention with Linux being open source you can customize everything down to the OS to fit your needs. Which in supercomputing tend to get quite specific.

"Kamgusta said:
You can play Crysis in Linux using Wine.
So, yeah, it can play Crysis, after all.
Does Wine come with display outputs now? :D
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#11
Valantar
"bug said:
Does Wine come with display outputs now? :D
Steam Play does. No official Crysis support, but no doubt that'll arrive soon.

Still, this whole "OMG OH NOES this datacenter product isn't for gamers OMG OMG AMD hates gamers!!!!11!!1!" stuff is getting too old, it ought to be put out to pasture a long time ago.
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#12
Frick
Fishfaced Nincompoop
"m4dn355 said:
TPU and fellow members should put the Crysis reference to rest. Amen
Yes, but not because of age but rather because Crysis was very forgiving when you dialed back the settings. It was only on the highest settings it became properly brutal on the hardware.
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#13
qubit
Overclocked quantum bit
"HTC said:
The problem with Windows is the licensing costs because Windows does it on a per certain-amount-of-cores basis and Linux does not: it's that simple.

In the supercomputer world, you generally have thousands of CPUs and / or GPUs and the licensing costs are staggering in these situations if using Windows.
So you're saying that the licensing costs would outweigh extra sales of the cards? I don't have any numbers to make a proper judgement, but it doesn't seem right to me. Dunno.
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#14
HTC
"qubit said:
So you're saying that the licensing costs would outweigh extra sales of the cards? I don't have any numbers to make a proper judgement, but it doesn't seem right to me. Dunno.
No, but i'm saying it favors Linux / other OSes instead of Windows because of licensing costs: that is regardless of the number of CPUs / GPUs used in the supercomputer in question.

Micro$oft is still operating "in the past" with the way they manage licensing and that forces customers that have high core / thread counts to look for alternatives: the higher the core counts, the more they are driven away from Windows and unless whatever is needed to run on the supercomputer only runs on Windows, they'll look for other OSes.
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#15
Aquinus
Resident Wat-man
Isn't this kind of like buying a 2P Xeon server with a ton of cores and not very high clock speeds then complaining about it not running games well?

It's a GPU that's not intended for playing games, so why do you people even care?
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#16
Vayra86
"Valantar said:
Still, this whole "OMG OH NOES this datacenter product isn't for gamers OMG OMG AMD hates gamers!!!!11!!1!" stuff is getting too old, it ought to be put out to pasture a long time ago.
Exactly, its quite next level to see staff doing subtle flamebaits.

And not in a good way, and it happens in nearly every piece @btarunr puts out, editorial or not. What happened to just reporting the news?

"Aquinus said:
Isn't this kind of like buying a 2P Xeon server with a ton of cores and not very high clock speeds then complaining about it not running games well?

It's a GPU that's not intended for playing games, so why do you people even care?
See above. There was no reason to put the title it had, and it was obvious this was going to happen because of it. Hell, even without it, its hard enough...
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#17
yakk
It's not supposed to, bad clickbait post (not really an article). :kookoo:

OTOH Having AMD devote thier resources to their Linux drivers is a *MASSIVE* win for Linux users everywhere! :toast:
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#18
Vya Domus
"Aquinus said:

It's a GPU that's not intended for playing games, so why do you people even care?
Hope, desperation, frustration, etc. The current consumer GPU landscape isn't very appealing to most hence the bizarre interest in this.
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#20
lexluthermiester
"m4dn355 said:
TPU and fellow members should put the Crysis reference to rest. Amen
Not a chance. Crysis is still a relevant performance metric because it still taxes cards even to this day.
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#21
jabbadap
The purpose of this card is to play Crysis not run it... Albeit it should do the both at the same time just fine.
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#22
bug
"jabbadap said:
The purpose of this card is to play Crysis not run it... Albeit it should do the both at the same time just fine.
That wouldn't be much of an achievement since the AI in Crysis is notoriously bad.
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#23
lexluthermiester
"bug said:
That wouldn't be much of an achievement since the AI in Crysis is notoriously bad.
Try playing on the hardest difficulty setting..
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#24
bug
"lexluthermiester said:
Try playing on the hardest difficulty setting..
Never played it, but it was discussed at length when it was released. It used to resort to tricks like "seeing" you even when cloaked. And there was this video where a guy simply ran in circles and the enemies made a bee line in his wake.

And generally speaking, you get your rear handed to you on higher difficulty settings because the computer gets super-human accuracy and reactions, not because the AI is good or not.
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#25
GoldenX
"bug said:
Not to mention with Linux being open source you can customize everything down to the OS to fit your needs. Which in supercomputing tend to get quite specific.


Does Wine come with display outputs now? :D
You send the data to the IGP/second card with outputs.
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