Tuesday, November 14th 2017

Battlefield V with RTX Initial Tests: Performance Halved

Having survived an excruciatingly slow patch update, we are testing "Battlefield V" with DirectX Ray-tracing and NVIDIA RTX enabled, across the GeForce RTX 2070, RTX 2080, and RTX 2080 Ti, augmenting the RTX-on test data to our Battlefield V Performance Analysis article. We began testing with a GeForce RTX 2080 Ti graphics card with GeForce 416.94 WHQL drivers on Windows 10 1809. Our initial test results are shocking. With RTX enabled in the "ultra" setting, frame-rates dropped by close to 50% at 1080p.

These may look horrifying, given that at its highest setting, even an RTX 2080 Ti isn't able to manage 1080p 120 Hz. But all is not lost. DICE added granularity to RTX. You can toggle between off, low, medium, high, and ultra as "degrees" of RTX level of detail, under the "DXR ray-traced reflections quality" setting. We are currently working on 27 new data-points (each of the RTX 20-series graphics cards, at each level of RTX, and at each of the three resolutions we tested at).

Update: Our full performance analysis article is live now, including results for RTX 2070, 2080, 2080 Ti, each at RTX off/low/medium/high/ultra.
Add your own comment

180 Comments on Battlefield V with RTX Initial Tests: Performance Halved

#176
VPII
This is a case of software catching up with technology and not the other way around. DICE will eventually get it to work as it should. I mean go and look at the Star Wars demo using the Unreal Engine with RTRT running with one RTX 2080.
Posted on Reply
#177
londiste
RT cores do not seem to be that expensive in terms of die space, 10% or a little below that compared to Volta and ~15% compared to Pascal.
Tensor cores and other Volta stuff is what takes up a lot of space on Turings.
Posted on Reply
#178
Xzibit
londiste said:
RT cores do not seem to be that expensive in terms of die space, 10% or a little below that compared to Volta and ~15% compared to Pascal.
Tensor cores and other Volta stuff is what takes up a lot of space on Turings.
Turing has a 1:1 (SM:RT) they need to make them better or increase 1:2+
Posted on Reply
#179
VPII
In all honesty as I stated before, I do not think the current RTX cards cannot handle real time ray tracing it is more a case of software not using the hardware properly and that will be ironed out going forward.
Posted on Reply
Add your own comment