Tuesday, January 8th 2019

Toshiba Memory Unveils 1TB Single Package PCIe Gen3 x4 SSD with 96-Layer 3D Flash

Toshiba Memory Corporation, the world leader in memory solutions, today announced the BG4 series, a new line-up of single package NVMe SSDs with capacities up to 1,024 GB, which places both innovative 96-layer 3D flash memory and an all-new controller into one package to deliver best-in-class read performance. The BG4 series is currently sampling to PC OEM customers in limited quantities, with general sample availability expected later in the second calendar quarter of 2019.

This new series of single package SSDs, featuring PCIe Gen 3.0 x4 lanes, offers sequential read performance up to 2,250 MB/s, and with improved flash management delivers industry-leading random read performance up to 380,000 IOPS. The BG4 single package SSDs are suitable for compact and performance-oriented systems, such as ultra-thin PC notebooks, IoT embedded systems and server boot in data centers.
Additionally, the BG4 series improves upon the prior generation BG3 series in sequential and random write performance by approximately 70% and 90% respectively. Furthermore, power efficiency was improved up to 20% in read and 7% in write by utilizing Toshiba Memory's cutting-edge BiCS FLASH 3D flash memory and a new SSD controller.

The BG4 single package SSD series will be available in four capacities of 128 GB, 256 GB, 512GB, and 1,024 GB, with a slim 1.3 mm height profile for capacities up to 512 GB. Form factor options include a surface-mount M.2 1620 (16 x 20 mm) single package or a removable M.2 2230 (22 x 30 mm) module, enabling more design flexibility for thin and light mobile PCs.

The BG4 SSDs are built upon the NVM Express Revision 1.3b specification and features optional self-encrypting drive (TCG Opal version 2.01) models.
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11 Comments on Toshiba Memory Unveils 1TB Single Package PCIe Gen3 x4 SSD with 96-Layer 3D Flash

#1
cucker tarlson
64-layer tlc is already good enough to endure any consumer usage for lots and lots of years. it's the controllers that limit the performance and are responsible for drive failures.
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#2
randomUser
industry-leading random read performance up to 380,000 IOPS
380k iops is no where near being leading. What a marketing crap.

I would say they are leading ONLY if it is 380k iops for 4k random operations at QD1, otherwise this is all a bull crap of marketing.
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#3
Mussels
Moderprator
That is tiny for a 1TB drive
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#4
hat
Enthusiast
randomUser, post: 3972718, member: 176138"
380k iops is no where near being leading. What a marketing crap.

I would say they are leading ONLY if it is 380k iops for 4k random operations at QD1, otherwise this is all a bull crap of marketing.
You didn't know? Everyone is a leader...
Posted on Reply
#5
punani
hat, leading key masher unveils a new post in TPU forums
Posted on Reply
#6
BakerMan1971
Pretty cool, if they then make full length M.2 drives this way do we get loads more TB's?
Posted on Reply
#7
silentbogo
randomUser, post: 3972718, member: 176138"
380k iops is no where near being leading. What a marketing crap.
For a single-chip M.2 2242 that's actually quite impressive. Considering that almost no one except toshiba makes PCIe NVMe in 2242 format (with some exceptions, that are near-impossible to find), it ups the previous MLC model in random reads by 66%, and more than doubles IOPS comparing to TLC-based RC100.
This also means that soon we'll have affordable 2TB full-size NVMe drives (hopefully sub-$200).
Posted on Reply
#8
bug
randomUser, post: 3972718, member: 176138"
380k iops is no where near being leading. What a marketing crap.

I would say they are leading ONLY if it is 380k iops for 4k random operations at QD1, otherwise this is all a bull crap of marketing.
Any flash maker can claim they're in the top 10. And they wouldn't be lying ;)
Posted on Reply
#9
newtekie1
Semi-Retired Folder
randomUser, post: 3972718, member: 176138"
380k iops is no where near being leading. What a marketing crap.

I would say they are leading ONLY if it is 380k iops for 4k random operations at QD1, otherwise this is all a bull crap of marketing.
The industry of small form factor single package PCIe NVMe SSDs isn't that big.
Posted on Reply
#10
roberto888
Would one of these work in an NGFF Wi-Fi card slot?
Posted on Reply
#11
silentbogo
roberto888, post: 3972905, member: 54360"
Would one of these work in an NGFF Wi-Fi card slot?
Not all. It's gonna work on some newer Lenovo Thinkpad and Dell Latitude laptops in the secondary WWAN slot (not WiFi slot), or most notebooks/ultrabooks with dedicated NVME slot.
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