Monday, March 11th 2019

ASUS Releases ProArt PA34VC Professional Monitor - 21:9, 3440 x 1440 10-bit IPS Panel, HDR 10, 1900R

ASUS today released the latest into their line of ProArt monitors, especially geared for professionals, where color accuracy is paramount. The ProArt PA34VC features a 21:9 aspect ratio over a 3440 x 1440 IPS panel, which guarantees double the widescreen space of conventional 1080p monitors. The panel already comes factory-calibrated, so there's no need to mix things up in post-buy tinkering (though it does support ASUS' ProArt Calibration Technology,

There's HDR 10 VESA certification with 100% sRGB color gamut coverage, dual Thunderbolt 3 ports for video connectivity and data-transfers at speeds of up to 40 Gbps. These Thunderbolt ports also enable Power Delivery of up to 60W to external devices. It also features built-in Picture-in-Picture (PiP) and Picture-by-Picture (PbP). Gray-to-gray response time is being rated at 0.1ms, according to ASUS, while typical brightness caps out at 300 cd/m².
Source: ASUS
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21 Comments on ASUS Releases ProArt PA34VC Professional Monitor - 21:9, 3440 x 1440 10-bit IPS Panel, HDR 10, 1900R

#1
jmcslob
Brightness is a bit low for that color spectrum... No point in a 10 bit HDR panel that literally can't do it.
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#2
kastriot
From 0.05 cd/M^2 to 1000 cd/M^2 is minimum requremment for HDR LCD-s so this is not HDR10, it's a joke.
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#4
Vya Domus
I wish people would realize once and for all that that the peak brightness of a display is not all. Most OLEDs barley brake the 500 nit mark, what matters most is the contrast. You can have a display that blinds you but if it doesn't have proper local dimming this characteristic is worthless.
Posted on Reply
#5
bug
kastriot said:
From 0.05 cd/M^2 to 1000 cd/M^2 is minimum requremment for HDR LCD-s so this is not HDR10, it's a joke.
HDR10 is a standard for the input signal (i.e. it means the device can read the values you mentioned), it can be implemented on monochrome displays if you want to.

That said, I have to see a professional mastering content on a curved display. Last I checked, focal plane curvature in lenses was still a defect, you know.
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#6
Valantar
bug said:
HDR10 is a standard for the input signal (i.e. it means the device can read the values you mentioned), it can be implemented on monochrome displays if you want to.

That said, I have to see a professional mastering content on a curved display. Last I checked, focal plane curvature in lenses was still a defect, you know.
I'd think they would turn away way before that, seeing how this tops out at sRGB.

raevenlord
The ProArt PA34VC features a 21:9 aspect ratio over a 3440 x 1440 IPS panel, which guarantees double the widescreen space of conventional 1080p monitors.
That... is not how math works. In terms of width it's 80% more, in desktop area (as in resolution) it's 2.5 times more. In terms of physical size, that entirely depends on the size of the monitor you're comparing to. It's a lot smaller than a 50" 1080p monitor...
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#7
lynx29
Vya Domus said:
I wish people would realize once and for all that that the peak brightness of a display is not all. Most OLEDs barley brake the 500 nit mark, what matters most is the contrast. You can have a display that blinds you but if it doesn't have proper local dimming this characteristic is worthless.
they really need to advertise how many local dimming zones each monitor has then, I know Vizio always brags about its 384 zones in most of its 4k tv's, and good for them lol
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#8
my_name_is_earl
It seem that Asus think its Apple. Charging premium for everything and they're not even the best in monitor business.
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#9
INSTG8R
My Custom Title
my_name_is_earl said:
It seem that Asus think its Apple. Charging premium for everything and they're not even the best in monitor business.
I dunno man I’m really missing my Asus MG279Q IPS. My “new” Samsung CGH70 QLED VA Is terrible in comparison...
Posted on Reply
#10
Zendo911
Vya Domus said:
I wish people would realize once and for all that that the peak brightness of a display is not all. Most OLEDs barley brake the 500 nit mark, what matters most is the contrast. You can have a display that blinds you but if it doesn't have proper local dimming this characteristic is worthless.
No, I have a Sony Xperia 9 series (4K TV) with a maximum brightness of around 850 nit and I can tell you the thing that wows me the most (along with others who view the TV) is the maximum brightness points (think the sun in Forza Horizon 4). My TV has a "full local dimming array", but it's still an LED after all, and in no way the local dimming have an effect on the picture comparable to the maximum brightness.
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#11
Prima.Vera
bug said:

That said, I have to see a professional mastering content on a curved display. Last I checked, focal plane curvature in lenses was still a defect, you know.
Sorry, but this is a little wrong. This display is best suited for film editors (eg: cinemascopic format), where is perfect to see how the actual movie would look like in Cinemas that have ultra-wide curved screens. ;)
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#12
Valantar
Zendo911 said:
No, I have a Sony Xperia 9 series (4K TV) with a maximum brightness of around 850 nit and I can tell you the thing that wows me the most (along with others who view the TV) is the maximum brightness points (think the sun in Forza Horizon 4). My TV has a "full local dimming array", but it's still an LED after all, and in no way the local dimming have an effect on the picture comparable to the maximum brightness.
Peak spot brightness can be quite important for effects like those you describe, peak full-panel brightness less so - after all, if the entire screen goes bright white, it's hard to see much anyhow. FALD is also a good compromise for making LCDs comparable to OLEDs in terms of contrast, even if they inevitably have blooming around bright spots - unless all you do is play horror games, that's not likely to be very noticeable, after all. OLED is still superior in some ways, but also inferior in others - and to me, the risk of burn-in is far more concerning than a few bright spots in dark scenes.

Prima.Vera said:
Sorry, but this is wrong. This display is best suited for film editors (eg: cinemascopic format), where is perfect to see how the actual movie would look like in Cinemas that have ultra-wide curved screens. ;)
You're likely right. The curvature is more extreme than cinemas (except maybe IMAX), but you're likely right otherwise. Just a shame that this has such a narrow gamut.
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#13
Tsukiyomi91
3440x1440 curved display with a measly 300 nits & calls it "professional monitor"?? ASUS is smoking the wrong mushroom yet again.
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#14
las
Fake HDR like 99.9999477% of HDR PC monitors :)

INSTG8R said:
I dunno man I’m really missing my Asus MG279Q IPS. My “new” Samsung CGH70 QLED VA Is terrible in comparison...
Loving my PG279Q. I tested C27HG70 for a few weeks. No way I'd trade my PG279Q for that. It does not even do good HDR even tho it's DisplayHDR 600 and VA is way too slow in pixel response times for my use (FPS). For a VA panel the blacks and colors were not even that good. Nowhere near Eizo FG2421 for example (that monitors had so many other cons tho)..

Vya Domus said:
I wish people would realize once and for all that that the peak brightness of a display is not all. Most OLEDs barley brake the 500 nit mark, what matters most is the contrast. You can have a display that blinds you but if it doesn't have proper local dimming this characteristic is worthless.
For HDR on LCD, it is pretty much everything. Needs at least 600 (bare minimum) and FALD with good zone control to work decent.

I have never seen great HDR on a LCD panel.
Posted on Reply
#15
bug
Tsukiyomi91 said:
3440x1440 curved display with a measly 300 nits & calls it "professional monitor"?? ASUS is smoking the wrong mushroom yet again.
You looking at Asus and expecting a product for professionals? You're smoking the wrong mushroom :D
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#16
Tsukiyomi91
@bug something like that. But, their ROG monitors are decent thou. XD
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#17
bug
Tsukiyomi91 said:
@bug something like that. But, their ROG monitors are decent thou. XD
For gaming, yes. Their motherboards are nice, too (though quirky at times). Some of their laptops are decent. For everything else, they're usually subpar.
And besides motherboards, their QC seems to be all over the place.
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#18
Valantar
bug said:
You looking at Asus and expecting a product for professionals? You're smoking the wrong mushroom :D
I think you're on to something here. Outside of motherboards and GPUs, I don't think I've ever seen an Asus product and thought "that ticks all the right boxes". Some ROG monitors and laptops come close (except for their extreme "look what a pro gamer I am" aesthetic), but for non-ROG laptops and anything "pro" they just don't seem to quite understand what goes into "premium" and "professional". This monitor demonstrates that perfectly - a curved 100Hz VA display with a relatively narrow color gamut targeted at... photography/VFX/video/3D/CAD professionals? That doesn't add up to me. At the very least I imagine wide color gamut support would trump refresh rates in 100% of cases in those industries.
Posted on Reply
#19
bug
Valantar said:
I think you're on to something here. Outside of motherboards and GPUs, I don't think I've ever seen an Asus product and thought "that ticks all the right boxes". Some ROG monitors and laptops come close (except for their extreme "look what a pro gamer I am" aesthetic), but for non-ROG laptops and anything "pro" they just don't seem to quite understand what goes into "premium" and "professional". This monitor demonstrates that perfectly - a curved 100Hz VA display with a relatively narrow color gamut targeted at... photography/VFX/video/3D/CAD professionals? That doesn't add up to me. At the very least I imagine wide color gamut support would trump refresh rates in 100% of cases in those industries.
The thing is, even as a professional, if your target is digital, you have to keep in mind most of audience will have devices limited to sRGB. But when you go to print, the story changes.
Also, I don't think they don't understand what makes a premium or professional product. It's just that their game is more like "use this slightly off mainstream component, slap on a nice sticker and people will be more than happy to pay a premium for that".
Posted on Reply
#20
INSTG8R
My Custom Title
las said:
Loving my PG279Q. I tested C27HG70 for a few weeks. No way I'd trade my PG279Q for that. It does not even do good HDR even tho it's DisplayHDR 600 and VA is way too slow in pixel response times for my use (FPS). For a VA panel the blacks and colors were not even that good. Nowhere near Eizo FG2421 for example (that monitors had so many other cons tho)..
Yeah it’s been a very disappointing experience. I just wanted Freesync 2 and full range(ASUS was 35-90 only “bad thing) but the horrible backlight bleed for me is the big one. It’s like “marquee lighting” all around the borders which no settings alleviates. I agree with the rest of your points though. Rather disappointed in Samsung if I’m honest.
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#21
Tsukiyomi91
a measly Dell Ultrasharp IPS monitor does better than this "professional" monitor IMO, in terms of price & features.
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