Sunday, August 11th 2019

SK Hynix Announces its HBM2E Memory Products, 460 GB/s and 16GB per Stack

SK Hynix Inc. announced today that it has developed HBM2E DRAM product with the industry's highest bandwidth. The new HBM2E boasts approximately 50% higher bandwidth and 100% additional capacity compared to the previous HBM2. SK Hynix's HBM2E supports over 460 GB (Gigabyte) per second bandwidth based on the 3.6 Gbps (gigabits-per-second) speed performance per pin with 1,024 data I/Os (Inputs/Outputs). Through utilization of the TSV (Through Silicon Via) technology, a maximum of eight 16-gigabit chips are vertically stacked, forming a single, dense package of 16 GB data capacity.

SK Hynix's HBM2E is an optimal memory solution for the fourth Industrial Era, supporting high-end GPU, supercomputers, machine learning, and artificial intelligence systems that require the maximum level of memory performance. Unlike commodity DRAM products which take on module package forms and mounted on system boards, HBM chip is interconnected closely to processors such as GPUs and logic chips, distanced only a few µm units apart, which allows even faster data transfer.
"SK Hynix has established its technological leadership since its world's first HBM release in 2013," said Jun-Hyun Chun, Head of HBM Business Strategy. "SK Hynix will begin mass production in 2020, when the HBM2E market is expected to open up, and continue to strengthen its leadership in the premium DRAM market."
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6 Comments on SK Hynix Announces its HBM2E Memory Products, 460 GB/s and 16GB per Stack

#1
R0H1T
This puts it right within striking distance of HBM3, which was supposed to debut @2TBps for 4 stacks & similar capacity IIRC. Speaking of which, I wonder what happened to this next gen memory :confused:
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#2
Patriot
R0H1T, post: 4096673, member: 131092"
This puts it right within striking distance of HBM3, which was supposed to debut @2TBps for 4 stacks & similar capacity IIRC. Speaking of which, I wonder what happened to this next gen memory :confused:
Well when the memory companies conspired and quadroupled the prices together... it became a lot less appealing.
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#3
Prima.Vera
Does that mean 3680GB/s for a 16GB package?
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#4
Aquinus
Resident Wat-man
If only we could take a Ryzen 3900x and replace one of the chiplets with a stack of this stuff.
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#5
HugsNotDrugs
Aquinus, post: 4097283, member: 102461"
If only we could take a Ryzen 3900x and replace one of the chiplets with a stack of this stuff.
I'm sure something like that is already in development at AMD and Intel.

It's certainly the evolution of SOCs is to put high-bandwidth low-latency memory on the package itself. Someday we'll lose our external memory slots.
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#6
Aquinus
Resident Wat-man
HugsNotDrugs, post: 4097759, member: 164532"
I'm sure something like that is already in development at AMD and Intel.

It's certainly the evolution of SOCs is to put high-bandwidth low-latency memory on the package itself. Someday we'll lose our external memory slots.
That's good for ultrabooks. More room for battery, less space needed for the motherboard. I seriously doubt that desktops and servers will lose external memory though.
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