Friday, September 20th 2019

Intel Cascade Lake-X Core i9-10980XE Put Through Its Paces in GeekBench

Intel's upcoming Extreme Edition Core i9-10980XE from the Cascade Lake-X family. Cascade Lake-X (CSL-X) will be Intel's next take on the High End Desktop (HEDT) systems. The Core i9-10980XE is pegged as the flagship on that lineup, sporting an 18-core, 36-thread design, and are still based on Intel's 14 nm process node. These processors will be pin-compatible with Intel's LGA 2066 platform. Caches are expected to be set at 1.125 MB, 18 MB and 24.75 MB of L1, L2 and L3.

Base clocks set in the Geekbench 4 entry are set at 4.1 GHz, with a maximum boost of 4.7 GHz. That's a lot of frequency on a 14 nm CPU with 18 cores; if previous entries on the Intel HEDT family (such as the i9-9980XE) sported a 165 W TDP with clocks of 3.0 GHz and 4.4 GHz respectively, it seems highly unlikely that Intel will keep the same TDP for the i9-10980XE - and even if they do, power consumption will certainly be higher. Those reported clocks for the i9-10980XE may not be right, however - we don't know the conditions of the test run.
Sources: GeekBench, via Momomo_us @ Twitter, Tom's Hardware
Add your own comment

18 Comments on Intel Cascade Lake-X Core i9-10980XE Put Through Its Paces in GeekBench

#1
phanbuey
those scores look kind of low.
Posted on Reply
#2
R0H1T
Outside of a hand fingerful of scenarios, TR3 will murder these already obsolete parts beyond recognition.
Of course if you're doing workstation i.e. serious work & don't mind OCing your work PC, then this is probably great news for those prefer Intel & perhaps better ST performance.
Posted on Reply
#3
phanbuey
R0H1T
Outside of a hand fingerful of scenarios, TR3 will murder these already obsolete parts beyond recognition.
Of course if you're doing workstation i.e. serious work & don't mind OCing your work PC, then this is probably great news for those prefer Intel & perhaps better ST performance.
The 3950x alone might murder this chip if these scores are anything to go by.
Posted on Reply
#5
jeremyshaw
"pin compatible" with LGA2066 like "pin compatible" was with LGA1151? Even if they use the same chipset (goodbye Z270, hello "Z370!"), I no longer give Intel any benefit of the doubt.
Posted on Reply
#6
altcapwn
jeremyshaw
"pin compatible" with LGA2066 like "pin compatible" was with LGA1151? Even if they use the same chipset (goodbye Z270, hello "Z370!"), I no longer give Intel any benefit of the doubt.
Pin compatible which means nothing depending on chipset compatibility of the CPU :P.
Posted on Reply
#7
efikkan
phanbuey
those scores look kind of low.
Intel usually does in GeekBench, but who cares? GeekBench is a useless benchmark anyway.
Additionally, any user submitted benchmark scores are going to be useless for comparison anyway, as there are so many variables impacting the score, ranging from BIOS (and BIOS settings), memory configuration, cooling, testing conditions, drivers, etc. etc.

jeremyshaw
"pin compatible" with LGA2066 like "pin compatible" was with LGA1151? Even if they use the same chipset (goodbye Z270, hello "Z370!"), I no longer give Intel any benefit of the doubt.
When they retain the chipset, it should be fully compatible.
But I guess as with both Intel and AMD, you need a BIOS update, and if you have a motherboard without some kind of "flashback" solution, then tough luck…
Posted on Reply
#8
tabascosauz
efikkan
But I guess as with both Intel and AMD, you need a BIOS update, and if you have a motherboard without some kind of "flashback" solution, then tough luck…
That's never been an issue, at least in North America. You can pay anywhere between $25 to $80 for a large store to do the BIOS update if you're buying a board new, and have it done by the time you pick it up. And if you already are using the board, you already have the means to do the BIOS update.
Posted on Reply
#9
efikkan
tabascosauz
That's never been an issue, at least in North America. You can pay anywhere between $25 to $80 for a large store to do the BIOS update if you're buying a board new, and have it done by the time you pick it up. And if you already are using the board, you already have the means to do the BIOS update.
I don't know the market distribution in America, but at least in Europe builders usually buy their stuff online. When doing so, the buyer have no idea whether the motherboard BIOS is updated, or if this is a motherboard which have been in storage for months.

I think this is an easily solvable problem though, all Intel/AMD would have to do is to add a fallback firmware good enough to flash the BIOS, and then the motherboard makers to update their BIOSes to display this on screen and allow flashing.
Posted on Reply
#10
LFaWolf
Awesome! Right now the sweet spot for me is 12-core or even 14-core. Here is hoping all the board makers will release a BIOS update and the 12-core variant can hit 4GHz base and 4.6 Boost. I would definitely take at least 2 for my team.
Posted on Reply
#11
Vlada011
People will buy obsolete PCI-E Interface...14nm...
I don't know how people could ignore facts any more.
I have Intel and I wait better Intel but they offer nothing. They have no answer 2 years on AMD Zen Core.
AMD sell now R9-3900X capable to serve as gaming PC and better then some Threadripper models.
How much will Intel charge performance of R9-3900X with PCI-E 3.0 and slower OS drives then on AMD platform.
Exactly in moment when Intel show up with 10th Gen Samsung, Toshiba, and others start race in performance of M.2 NVMe Gen 4.0.
Posted on Reply
#12
LFaWolf
Vlada011
People will buy obsolete PCI-E Interface...14nm...
I don't know how people could ignore facts any more.
I have Intel and I wait better Intel but they offer nothing. They have no answer 2 years on AMD Zen Core.
AMD sell now R9-3900X capable to serve as gaming PC and better then some Threadripper models.
How much will Intel charge performance of R9-3900X with PCI-E 3.0 and slower OS drives then on AMD platform.
Exactly in moment when Intel show up with 10th Gen Samsung, Toshiba, and others start race in performance of M.2 NVMe Gen 4.0.
Simple, because look at the stability issues with the 3xxx - many BIOS updates, Pablo, memory incompatibility with many memory kits, dual ranks problem, can't support 2x16GB kit. How can I get to 64GB with 4 slots available? As for Threadripper, same thing with memory compatibility, dual rank problem and scheduling performance. The list goes on.

Also, the difference between PCI-e 3 and 4 is minimal for day to day tasks.

Both are good platform, but many people don't have the time to deal with so many issues to tune to maybe get it working.
Posted on Reply
#13
kapone32
LFaWolf
Simple, because look at the stability issues with the 3xxx - many BIOS updates, Pablo, memory incompatibility with many memory kits, dual ranks problem, can't support 2x16GB kit. How can I get to 64GB with 4 slots available? As for Threadripper, same thing with memory compatibility, dual rank problem and scheduling performance. The list goes on.

Also, the difference between PCI-e 3 and 4 is minimal for day to day tasks.

Both are good platform, but many people don't have the time to deal with so many issues to tune to maybe get it working.
Like the X299 launch was any better
Posted on Reply
#14
LFaWolf
kapone32
Like the X299 launch was any better
I didn't buy mine during launch so..:clap:. As a matter of fact I haven't even started building them yet. I just have the board memory and SSD. Waiting on the latest CPUs.
Posted on Reply
#15
Slizzo
tabascosauz
That's never been an issue, at least in North America. You can pay anywhere between $25 to $80 for a large store to do the BIOS update if you're buying a board new, and have it done by the time you pick it up. And if you already are using the board, you already have the means to do the BIOS update.
Except there's no store here where that could be done for me. Closest Microcenter is over 3 hours away.
Posted on Reply
#16
kapone32
LFaWolf
I didn't buy mine during launch so..:clap:. As a matter of fact I haven't even started building them yet. I just have the board memory and SSD. Waiting on the latest CPUs.
:D
Posted on Reply
#17
ratirt
Vlada011
People will buy obsolete PCI-E Interface...14nm...
I don't know how people could ignore facts any more.
I have Intel and I wait better Intel but they offer nothing. They have no answer 2 years on AMD Zen Core.
AMD sell now R9-3900X capable to serve as gaming PC and better then some Threadripper models.
How much will Intel charge performance of R9-3900X with PCI-E 3.0 and slower OS drives then on AMD platform.
Exactly in moment when Intel show up with 10th Gen Samsung, Toshiba, and others start race in performance of M.2 NVMe Gen 4.0.
I wouldn't buy new Ryzen because of the PCI-e 4.0. The race has started, yes. The fact is I'd wait for next gen to get something out of the PCIe 4.0 because now it is not worth it. Even PCIe 4.0 ain't faster than current top models. I'd wait because there is no rush. Or at least wait for next year when they have improved upon the PCIe 4.0 if you decide to go Ryzen 2 now.
Posted on Reply
#18
yotano211
Vlada011
People will buy obsolete PCI-E Interface...14nm...
I don't know how people could ignore facts any more.
I have Intel and I wait better Intel but they offer nothing. They have no answer 2 years on AMD Zen Core.
AMD sell now R9-3900X capable to serve as gaming PC and better then some Threadripper models.
How much will Intel charge performance of R9-3900X with PCI-E 3.0 and slower OS drives then on AMD platform.
Exactly in moment when Intel show up with 10th Gen Samsung, Toshiba, and others start race in performance of M.2 NVMe Gen 4.0.
It seems like so many people are coming out and bashing intel lately. It seems some people are not happy with what they have. Its good that AMD is releasing good products. There is little difference between PCI 3.0 and PCI 4.0 for SSD real world speeds.
Posted on Reply
Add your own comment