Sunday, October 20th 2019

SK hynix Develops 1Znm 16Gb DDR4 DRAM

SK hynix Inc. announced today that it has developed 1Znm 16Gb (Gigabits) DDR4 (Double Data Rate 4) DRAM. As 16Gb is the industry's largest density for a single chip, the total memory capacity per wafer is also the largest of the existing DRAMs. The productivity of this product has improved by about 27% compared to the previous generation, 1Y nm. It does not require highly expensive extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography, which gives it a competitive edge cost-wise.

The new 1Z nm DRAM also supports a data transfer rate of up to 3,200 Mbps, which is the fastest data processing speed in DDR4 interface. The Company significantly increased its power efficiency, successfully reducing power consumption by about 40% compared to modules of the same density made with 1Y nm 8 Gb DRAM.
In particular, SK hynix applied a new substance not used in the manufacturing process of the previous generation, maximizing the capacitance of this 1Znm product. Capacitance, the amount of electrical charge a capacitor can store, is a key element of DRAM operation. A new design has also been introduced to increase operational stability.

"1Znm DDR4 DRAM boasts the industry's highest density, speed, and power efficiency, making it the best product to meet the changing demands of customers seeking high-performance/high-density DRAM," said Lee Jung-hoon, Head of 1Z TF of DRAM Development & Business. "SK hynix will start mass production and full-scale delivery next year to actively respond to market demand."

SK hynix plans to expand the 1Znm technology process to a variety of applications, such as LPDDR5, the next generation mobile DRAM, and HBM3, the fastest DRAM to be.
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6 Comments on SK hynix Develops 1Znm 16Gb DDR4 DRAM

#2
Fouquin
Minus Infinity
What does it mean 1Znm or 1Ynm?
It means they're coming up with fancy marketing to put in place of process size rather than straight up lie about it. It's basically the same as the "10nm Class" naming that Samsung uses for what is effectively 20/19nm.
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#3
TheLostSwede
Minus Infinity
What does it mean 1Znm or 1Ynm?
Here's a rough explanation. It's mostly a matter for the DRAM guys to not reveal too many details about their manufacturing process to the competition and it's just BS imho.
1X, stands for a process between 10 nm and 20 nm. 1X could mean 19 to 17 nm, 1Y may stand for 16 to 14 nm and 1Z for 13 to 10 nm - no manufacturer can look into the cards here.
https://www.guru3d.com/news-story/micron-starts-volume-production-of-1z-(13-to-10-nm)-nanometer-dram-process-node.html
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#4
Minus Infinity
TheLostSwede
Here's a rough explanation. It's mostly a matter for the DRAM guys to not reveal too many details about their manufacturing process to the competition and it's just BS imho.

https://www.guru3d.com/news-story/micron-starts-volume-production-of-1z-(13-to-10-nm)-nanometer-dram-process-node.html
Ah I see, yes I agree BS. Anadtech did a great articel on this a few years ago, showing the whole farce about naming convention for process nodes and what small % of the features sizes were actually the stated size of the node.
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#5
Valantar
TheLostSwede
Here's a rough explanation. It's mostly a matter for the DRAM guys to not reveal too many details about their manufacturing process to the competition and it's just BS imho.

https://www.guru3d.com/news-story/micron-starts-volume-production-of-1z-(13-to-10-nm)-nanometer-dram-process-node.html
I don't see how this is any more BS than any node naming - and arguably it's less BS as it's less precise than a specific number. 1x/y/z essentially says "smallest feature less than 20nm but more than 10nm, 1st/2nd/3rd generation". That's certainly more honest than renaming a tuned "16nm" or "14nm" process "12nm" when it has no change in the smallest feature size. And it's certainly better than 14+++++++.
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#6
Eskimonster
We see the same weard mesurements in CPU, 10 nm and 7 nm use transistors and chips that are larger then you think.
Infact its a beehive, companies use any trick to tell you they are working on a smaler node then the competitor.
GN have a nice video about this issue, interviewing a Intel guy.
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