Thursday, December 26th 2019

Intel LGA1200 Socket Sketched, Appears Cooler-compatible with LGA115x

Intel's upcoming LGA1200 mainstream desktop socket (aka socket H5), appears to be cooler-compatible with older LGA115x sockets. This would mean any CPU cooler compatible with sockets LGA1156, LGA1155, LGA1150, and LGA1151, should be mechanically compatible with LGA1200. You'd still need to ensure the cooler has enough thermal capacity to cool some of the higher TDP SKUs such as the range-topping Core i9-10900K.

Comparative mechanical drawings of LGA1200 and LGA1151 were posted by momomo_us and eUUUK50, which show the LGA1200 package to have the same dimensions as the older socket. A picture of the land-grid of an LGA1200 package also leaked to the web, showing how Intel utilized empty bits of the fiberglass substrate to cram in the additional 49 pins, without changing the size of the contacts. The LGA1200 socket debuts with Intel's 10th generation Core "Comet Lake" desktop processors and motherboards based on the company's 400-series chipsets. Intel is expected to launch these processors by Q2-2020.
Source: momomo_us (Twitter)
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42 Comments on Intel LGA1200 Socket Sketched, Appears Cooler-compatible with LGA115x

#1
Aerpoweron
Looks like the LGA 1200 CPUs would fit into LGA 1151 Sockets. Now we need a pinout to see the differences between LGA 1151 and LGA 1200. If these new pins are only for the Wifi 6 which was added with LGA 1200, we could theoretically run LGA 1200 CPUs on LGA 1151 boards.

LGA 1200 should have the same 16 PCI-E lanes as LGA 1151 as far as rumors go.

I really would like to get the new processors on my Z390 board. And to buy a new platform when the only new feature is Wifi is a hard sell in my eyes.
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#2
Melvis
:laugh: This is just funny.

Compatible with older....... coolers, classic!
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#3
Aerpoweron
The LGA 1156 and 1155 were pretty good. They had enough mass of aluminium and even had a cooper core :)
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#4
dj-electric
Im really not liking how even under fire intel finds it comfy to have a new socket for mostly reused hardware. This is not ok.
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#5
Midland Dog
saw this on VCZ ages ago and intel slides confirmed cooler compatibility and "expanded i/o"
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#6
Tsukiyomi91
as long the holes for the cooler are the same as LGA115x, then compatibility shouldn't be much of an issue.
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#7
Chloe Price
Aerpoweron
The LGA 1156 and 1155 were pretty good. They had enough mass of aluminium and even had a cooper core :)
Even some LGA1150 ones had copper core, the K ones and Pentium G3258 :)
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#8
Flanker
Cooler compatibility is a start. Not having to replace the whole bloody motherboard for marginal performance increase is what we are looking for.
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#9
IceShroom
Chloe Price
Even some LGA1150 ones had copper core, the K ones and Pentium G3258 :)
My Haswell i5 also has the cooler with copper core.
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#10
Chloe Price
IceShroom
My Haswell i5 also has the cooler with copper core.
Probably all the quadcores, I can't remember since well, pretty few uses those.
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#11
efikkan
Flanker
Cooler compatibility is a start. Not having to replace the whole bloody motherboard for marginal performance increase is what we are looking for.
No one is forcing you to upgrade every year. You should wait until there is a significant reason to upgrade.
It's better to invest in something that will last for a few years rather than constantly upgrading CPUs. The whole idea of buying a cheap CPU and then upgrading it later is really an edge case, and 1-3 years later there will be more relevant platforms anyway.
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#12
IceShroom
Chloe Price
Probably all the quadcores, I can't remember since well, pretty few uses those.
Could be.
AFAIK Intel went all Aluminium from Skylake.
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#13
birdie
Here's an official confirmation from a cooler company - scroll down to product pictures.

It's strange how most news pieces related to Intel CPUs are infested with idiots and AMD fans.

1. LGA 1151 has been on the scene since 2015 - Intel might have probably run out of options how to use all the pins on it which has finally warranted a new socket. Also, Comet Lake desktop CPUs feature 125W TDP (which means peak power consumption up to freaking 200W) which could warrant a much better power delivery.
2. If you swap your CPUs every year, most likely you're just dumb. There's a minimum performance improvement and a lot of money lost, and also changing a CPU is an error prone process which can render both your CPU and motherboard dead, so it's not advisable to do that all the time. I rocked a Sandy Bridge system up to 2019 and only a few months ago upgraded to a Ryzen 3000 CPU because I don't upgrade if I get less than a 30% single core performance uplift (sadly in some tasks my Sandy Bridge ran almost at the same speed as my current Ryzen 3700X).
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#14
Chloe Price
IceShroom
Could be.
AFAIK Intel went all Aluminium from Skylake.
Yes they did, and K SKUs don't come with a stock HSF at all. Which is probably a wise choice, when Haswell i7s throttled with stock speeds when using a stock HSF.
birdie
Here's an official confirmation from a cooler company - scroll down to product pictures.

It's strange how most news pieces related to Intel CPUs are infested with idiots and AMD fans.

1. LGA 1151 has been on the scene since 2015 - Intel might have probably run out of options how to use all the pins on it which has finally warranted a new socket. Also, Comet Lake desktop CPUs feature 125W TDP which could warrant a much better power delivery.
2. If you swap your CPUs every year, most likely you're just dumb. There's a minimum performance improvement and a lot of money lost, and also changing a CPU is an error prone process which can render both your CPU and motherboard dead, so it's not advisable to do that all the time. I rocked a Sandy Bridge system up to 2019 and only a few months ago upgraded to a Ryzen 3000 CPU because I don't upgrade if I get less than a 30% single core performance uplift.
Comedy Lake's "125W TDP" is as believable as 9900K's "95W".
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#15
efikkan
Chloe Price
Comedy Lake's "125W TDP" is as believable as 9900K's "95W".
Intel's TDP is accurate for sustained load with power limits enabled. But Intel allows for short burts above that TDP, so some cooler headroom is recommended.
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#16
Object55
Intel I've had z390 and a chip. I sold it and bought AMD. If you haven't switched the sockets I would have stayed. You could've pulled this off before but now when AMD is in front that's the dumbest move in the history of computing. Security hole riddled toasters with old production process with maximum of 10 cores. You have to be special kind of smart to buy into new motherboard platform now.
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#18
Bones
madness777
Look at the notches.


It's more than just the notches, look at the contact points for the socket pins, esp in relation to how they are to these notches. Locations of these contact points on the chip are different too so no easy modding of chips for different board models as was done before.
The fact you can use older coolers isn't a bad thing, aftermarket coolers many invested in could work even with the larger, highend chips depending on the cooler itself.
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#19
notb
Melvis
:laugh: This is just funny.

Compatible with older....... coolers, classic!
Well, you love pointing out that Intel changes sockets all the time, but the simple fact is: compatible coolers is a decent perk.
People change motherboards anyway for features. Changing heatsinks only makes sense when you drop them.

There's a high chance that an expensive Intel cooler bought a decade ago would work with all consumer Intel platforms released until now (both mainstream and HEDT) and - as it seems likely - will continue to work with next gen mainstream socket (HEDT very unlikely though).

Given that high-end coolers cost very nearly as much as motherboards, this is not something an intelligent person would mock.
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#20
Berfs1
efikkan
No one is forcing you to upgrade every year. You should wait until there is a significant reason to upgrade.
It's better to invest in something that will last for a few years rather than constantly upgrading CPUs. The whole idea of buying a cheap CPU and then upgrading it later is really an edge case, and 1-3 years later there will be more relevant platforms anyway.
Well AMD made it easier to just upgrade the CPU instead of paying an extreme premium just to get more performance. With Ryzen, just plug in a new CPU, and ur good. Keep all the other stuff too. Don’t need to reinstall drivers just because you changed cpus (maybe update bios but that’s about it)
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#21
eidairaman1
The Exiled Airman
Berfs1
Well AMD made it easier to just upgrade the CPU instead of paying an extreme premium just to get more performance. With Ryzen, just plug in a new CPU, and ur good. Keep all the other stuff too. Don’t need to reinstall drivers just because you changed cpus (maybe update bios but that’s about it)
The dude is a total amd hater/troll
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#22
notb
eidairaman1
The dude is a total amd hater/troll
Yes, we're AMD haters because we think most people don't replace CPUs often enough to notice a difference between socket life of 2 vs 4 years.

BTW: how's your FX doing? Will you ever benefit from the AM4 longevity that you praise so much? :P
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#23
E-curbi
Ahh LGA1200 - Comet Lake and Rocket Lake Z490 and Z495.

Think AMD might move ahead in Single Thread performance for 2020. And then Intel regains the lead in 2021? Either way we've finally got a real battle on our hands and thank goodness. :clap:

Just gonna sit back and watch the fireworks, lol. :laugh:

When the dust settles, probably update my platform either Intel Z590 Tiger Lake or AMD Ryzen 5000 CPUs sometime when ddr5 launches.

Always a blast to check out all the new motherboards for an upcoming chipset series, even when you're NOT buying a new platform. :)
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#24
Berfs1
eidairaman1
The dude is a total amd hater/troll
Yea amd sucks even though their cpus offer double the core counts of intel, more IPC than intel, and actually have lower TDPs (and stick to the TDPs way better than intel). Yea, I *hate* AMD. I mean, who gives a f*ck that AMD makes processors that offer more performance/watt, performance/$, and more cores with more IPC? I consider the 9900K a 210W cpu, not a 95W cpu, because that’s the secret turbo TDP. And no, I don’t hate AMD, I hate how intel loves to say they are better than AMD but don’t have the balls to state their turbo TDP 210W for the 8 core cpus.
madness777
Look at the notches.


This is when you go back to the LGA771/775 era and delete the notch on ur motherboard socket ;)
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#25
efikkan
Berfs1
Well AMD made it easier to just upgrade the CPU instead of paying an extreme premium just to get more performance. With Ryzen, just plug in a new CPU, and ur good. Keep all the other stuff too. Don’t need to reinstall drivers just because you changed cpus (maybe update bios but that’s about it)
There is no difference in needing to reinstall drivers with CPU swaps between Intel and AMD.

While I like the idea of motherboard support that spans many years, the way stuff works today it's more a fantasy than reality. Even with AM4 where the theoretical support from AMD is there (with a few exceptions), they should advertise the support with huge asterisks. It's really up to the motherboard markers to add and maintain support for CPU types and features in their BIOSes.

Motherboard makers don't really maintain their products for more than 1-2 years, except for occasional bugfixes, which often tend to break more things than they fix. They push out dozens of new motherboards each year, and by the time the new series is out, the old one is not actively maintained any more. Even when they roll out a new BIOS, they don't really test that many hardware configurations at all.
I would much rather want a motherboard that guarantees proper support for at least 3 years, then perhaps we can talk about adding support across multiple CPU generations.
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