Monday, April 27th 2020

Kingston Releases Next-Gen KC2500 NVMe PCIe SSD

Kingston Digital, Inc., the Flash memory affiliate of Kingston Technology Company, Inc., a world leader in memory products and technology solutions, today announced KC2500, its next generation M.2 NVMe PCIe SSD for desktop, workstations and high-performance computing (HPC) systems. KC2500 NVMe PCIe SSD delivers powerful performance using the latest Gen 3.0 x 4 controller and 96-layer 3D TLC NAND. With speeds up to 3,500 MB/s read and up to 2,900 MB/s write, KC2500 combines outstanding performance and endurance that improves workflow for desktop, workstation and power users.

KC2500 is available in capacities up to 2 TB housed in a compact M.2 2280 form factor that saves space for other components while allowing users to take advantage of PCIe speeds. The self-encrypting SSD supports a full-security suite for end-to-end data protection using AES-XTS 256-bit hardware-based encryption. It allows the usage of independent software vendors with TCG Opal 2.0 security management solutions such as Symantec, McAfee, WinMagic and others. KC2500 has built-in Microsoft eDrive support, a security storage specification for use with BitLocker.
Kingston KC2500
"KC2500 sets a new bar for high-performance client PC usage, enabling those who demand speed and reliability to handle intensive workloads on desktops, workstations and for HPC applications," said Justin Karasek, SSD business manager, Kingston. "The compact M.2 form factor and broad range of security and encryption options provides greater flexibility for organizations who are looking to refresh their current systems, or for the power user looking to upgrade their current system with the best that NVMe PCIe SSDs can offer."

KC2500 is currently available in 250 GB, 500 GB and 1 TB capacities with 2 TB shipping soon. KC2500 is backed by a limited five-year warranty and free technical support.

Kingston KC2500 NVMe PCIe SSD Features and Specifications:
  • Incredible NVMe PCIe Performance
  • Supports a full-Security Suite: TCG Opal 2.0, XTS-AES 256-bit, eDrive
  • Ideal for Desktop, Workstations and High-Performance Computing (HPC) Systems
  • Upgrade your PC with capacities up to 2 TB
  • Form Factor: M.2-2280
  • Interface: NVMe PCIe Gen 3.0 x 4 Lanes
  • Capacities: 250 GB, 500 GB, 1 TB, 2 TB
  • Controller: SMI 2262EN
  • NAND: 96-layer 3D TLC
  • Encrypted: AES-XTS 256 bit
  • Sequential Read/Write:
    o 250 GB - up to 3,500/1,200 MB/s
    o 500 GB - up to 3,500/2,500 MB/s
    o 1 TB - up to 3,500/2,900 MB/s
    o 2 TB - up to 3,500/2,900 MB/s
  • Random 4K Read/Write:
    o 250 GB - up to 375,000/300,000 IOPS
    o 500 GB - up to 375,000/300,000 IOPS
    o 1 TB - up to 375,000/300,000 IOPS
    o 2 TB - up to 375,000/300,000 IOPS
  • Total Bytes Written (TBW):
    o 250 GB - 150TBW
    o 500 GB - 300TBW
    o 1 TB - 600TBW
    o 2 TB - 1.2PBW
  • Power Consumption:0.003 W Idle /0.2 W Avg / 2.1 W (MAX) Read / 7 W (MAX) Write
  • Storage Temperature: -40°C~85°C
  • Operating Temperature: 0°C~70°C
  • Dimensions: 80 mm x 22 mm x 3.5mm
  • Weight:
    o 250 GB - 8 g
    o 500 GB - 10 g
    o 1 TB - 10 g
    o 2 TB - 11 g
  • Vibration Operating: 2.17G Peak (7-800Hz)
  • Vibration Non-operating: 20G Peak (20-1000Hz)
  • MTBF: 2,000,000
  • Warranty/Support: Limited 5-year warranty with free technical support
For more information, visit the product page.
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15 Comments on Kingston Releases Next-Gen KC2500 NVMe PCIe SSD

#2
scouserpcgamer
ok, so the same as the WD Black SN750 with the read and write speeds.
Im going to use 2TB as example as it is the biggest
Kingston KC2500 & WD Black SN750
Sequential Read/Write:
2TB - up to 3,500/2,900 MB/s
WD & Kingston 2 TB - 1.2PBW
WD Store price £400.99 Kingston not released

Seagate Firecuda 510 M.2 SSD
2TB - up to 3,450/3,200 MB/s
2TB - 2.6PBW
Ebuyer price £294.99

Wow
when you look at the specs and price, me personally i would go for the Seagate drive
Posted on Reply
#3
Tomgang
Yawn nothing next gen over this SSD. Just typical gen 3 nvme.
Posted on Reply
#4
bonehead123
brian_i6
Next-Gen?
Hummm, and here I was thinkin that pcie 4 drives were the "next gen"........oops...my bad.. :slap:
Posted on Reply
#5
windwhirl
brian_i6
Next-Gen?
Not really in general, but for the Kingston line it is an upgrade speed-wise, at least on paper. Everything else seems to be the same though.

FeatureKC2000KC2500
Seq. Read/Write250GB – up to 3,000/1,100MB/s
500GB – up to 3,000/2,000MB/s
1TB – up to 3,200/2,200MB/s
2TB – up to 3,200/2,200MB/s
250 GB - up to 3,500/1,200 MB/s
500 GB - up to 3,500/2,500 MB/s
1 TB - up to 3,500/2,900 MB/s
2 TB - up to 3,500/2,900 MB/s
Random 4k Read/Write250GB – up to 350,000/200,000 IOPS
500GB – up to 350,000/250,000 IOPS
1TB – up to 350,000/275,000 IOPS
2TB – up to 250,000/250,000 IOPS
250 GB - up to 375,000/300,000 IOPS
500 GB - up to 375,000/300,000 IOPS
1 TB - up to 375,000/300,000 IOPS
2 TB - up to 375,000/300,000 IOPS
Posted on Reply
#6
scouserpcgamer
windwhirl
Not really in general, but for the Kingston line it is an upgrade speed-wise, at least on paper. Everything else seems to be the same though.

FeatureKC2000KC2500
Seq. Read/Write250GB – up to 3,000/1,100MB/s
500GB – up to 3,000/2,000MB/s
1TB – up to 3,200/2,200MB/s
2TB – up to 3,200/2,200MB/s
250 GB - up to 3,500/1,200 MB/s
500 GB - up to 3,500/2,500 MB/s
1 TB - up to 3,500/2,900 MB/s
2 TB - up to 3,500/2,900 MB/s
Random 4k Read/Write250GB – up to 350,000/200,000 IOPS
500GB – up to 350,000/250,000 IOPS
1TB – up to 350,000/275,000 IOPS
2TB – up to 250,000/250,000 IOPS
250 GB - up to 375,000/300,000 IOPS
500 GB - up to 375,000/300,000 IOPS
1 TB - up to 375,000/300,000 IOPS
2 TB - up to 375,000/300,000 IOPS

Totally agree on paper not a lot of different on the models, still think the seagate one is great on price and performance
bonehead123
Hummm, and here I was thinkin that pcie 4 drives were the "next gen"........oops...my bad.. :slap:
Would agree the Seagate Firecuda 520 M.2 SSD is what i would consider next gen
Posted on Reply
#7
TheLostSwede
scouserpcgamer
Would agree the Seagate Firecuda 520 M.2 SSD is what i would consider next gen
Based on your UK pricing...
The situation is quite different in other parts of the world.
The WD Black SN750 costs the equivalent of £348 where I live and the Seagate FireCuda 510 costs the equivalent of £375, both in 2TB sizes.
As such, the Seagate drive would be a bad deal.
On the other hand, an Adata SX8200 Pro 2TB costs a mere £215.
This random SSD that I've never seen before, goes for as little as £188 for 2TB.
www.leven.com.tw/?page_id=673
Posted on Reply
#8
AnarchoPrimitiv
scouserpcgamer
Totally agree on paper not a lot of different on the models, still think the seagate one is great on price and performance


Would agree the Seagate Firecuda 520 M.2 SSD is what i would consider next gen
I Personally wouldn't even consider the CURRENT PCIe Gen 4 SSDs to be "next-gen" because they're all using the same NAND flash as PCIe 3.0 drives (whether it's 64 layer or 96 Layer TLC, or even MLC doesn't matter) and basically the same controllers (or at best, hastily developed) and the fact that they con only reach 5GB sequential transfers is evidence of this as 5GB/sec sequential transfers are basically the theoretical limit of PCIe Gen 3.0 x 4 bandwidth, so it's either the controllers or NAND basically bottlenecking the potential of PCIe Gen4 x4 bandwidth. What I will consider to be truly "next gen" is when something like the Samsung 980 Pro/EVO are announced (reports of the 980 pro reach sequential transfers of 7GB/sec in engineering samples shows that it is truly a PCIe Gen 4 capable controller as it's most likely not the NAND being used that's responsible for the speed boost). Also the yet to be released Phison PS5018-E18 controller that has been teased will also be truly "next-gen" with the use of PCIe 4.0 AS WELL AS NVMe 1.4 protocol, importantly using a 12nm node as opposed to 28nm which was used on the PS5016-E16 (the controller used in all the currently extant PCIe 4.0 NVMe drives) and even increasing the core count of the controller from two to three.
Posted on Reply
#10
scouserpcgamer
AnarchoPrimitiv
I Personally wouldn't even consider the CURRENT PCIe Gen 4 SSDs to be "next-gen" because they're all using the same NAND flash as PCIe 3.0 drives (whether it's 64 layer or 96 Layer TLC, or even MLC doesn't matter) and basically the same controllers (or at best, hastily developed) and the fact that they con only reach 5GB sequential transfers is evidence of this as 5GB/sec sequential transfers are basically the theoretical limit of PCIe Gen 3.0 x 4 bandwidth, so it's either the controllers or NAND basically bottlenecking the potential of PCIe Gen4 x4 bandwidth. What I will consider to be truly "next gen" is when something like the Samsung 980 Pro/EVO are announced (reports of the 980 pro reach sequential transfers of 7GB/sec in engineering samples shows that it is truly a PCIe Gen 4 capable controller as it's most likely not the NAND being used that's responsible for the speed boost). Also the yet to be released Phison PS5018-E18 controller that has been teased will also be truly "next-gen" with the use of PCIe 4.0 AS WELL AS NVMe 1.4 protocol, importantly using a 12nm node as opposed to 28nm which was used on the PS5016-E16 (the controller used in all the currently extant PCIe 4.0 NVMe drives) and even increasing the core count of the controller from two to three.
having just read up on that new controller
Phison PS5018-E18 wow that is fast
Posted on Reply
#11
AsRock
TPU addict
scouserpcgamer
having just read up on that new controller
Phison PS5018-E18 wow that is fast
be a Hell long time before i buy another with a Phison controller, my current one which drops and raises health% every week. Was only last week it dropped to 80% for a day or so and could not be recognized but after pluging it in another computer it showed up fine so put it back were it was and all was back to 98% once again.

Posted on Reply
#12
TheLostSwede
AsRock
be a Hell long time before i buy another with a Phison controller, my current one which drops and raises health% every week. Was only last week it dropped to 80% for a day or so and could not be recognized but after pluging it in another computer it showed up fine so put it back were it was and all was back to 98% once again.


Not seen anything like that from my Patriot drive. That said, the one I bought had a bit of an issue with the heatsink/thermal pad not touching the actual controller on the SSD. It caused it to overheat in like 30 seconds. Got it swapped out by Patriot, not questions asked. Been working flawlessly since then as my game drive.
Posted on Reply
#13
xvi
btarunr
KC2500 sets a new bar for high-performance client PC usage
No? No it doesn't? Not even close to any regard? I normally don't bother reading any of this marketing fluff but I don't see anything that makes this claim even remotely true.
Even the Samsung 970 Evo is something like 500k IOPS.
Posted on Reply
#14
AsRock
TPU addict
TheLostSwede
Not seen anything like that from my Patriot drive. That said, the one I bought had a bit of an issue with the heatsink/thermal pad not touching the actual controller on the SSD. It caused it to overheat in like 30 seconds. Got it swapped out by Patriot, not questions asked. Been working flawlessly since then as my game drive.
Well this has thermal pads on it now, as when i took it apart the metal was discolored.
Posted on Reply
#15
dicktracy
Everyone is snubbing PCIE 4.0 in anticipation of PCIE 5.0.
Posted on Reply
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