Tuesday, April 28th 2020

Intel 10th Generation Core Desktop Series Presentation Leaked

Ahead of its launch, tech publication HD Tecnologia posted the press-deck of Intel's 10th generation Core "Comet Lake-S" desktop processor series, as its launch is imminent (30th April, according to the slides). Right upfront, we see Intel's new retail packaging for the flagship Core i9 parts. Gone is the large acrylic dodecahedron, and in its place is a conventional paperboard-looking cuboidal box with a large triangular cutout window (probably made of LDPE) on the front face, which reveals the processor inside.

The next slide reveals all that's new with the 10th generation Core processor family, starting with clock speeds of up to 5.30 GHz, the desktop debut of Intel's Thermal Velocity Boost technology, HyperThreading being enabled across the board (Core i9 thru Core i3), native support for DDR4-2933, new CPU- and memory-overclocking features, and new platform I/O through the 400-series chipset. Next up, we see overclocker-relevant new features. Apparently, these processors allow you to toggle HyperThreading on a per-core basis. Until now, you could toggle HTT only across all cores. Next up, is "overclocking" for the PCI-Express x16 link (PEG) and DMI chipset bus. There are improved V/F curve controls with this generation. Intel is preparing to announce updated XTU and Performance Maximizer utilities. There are some packaging-level refinements, too, such as a physically thinner die (Z-height), making way for a thicker IHS. The internal TIM is still solder. We now move on to the actual SKUs.
The slides don't reveal which specific SKUs launch on April 30, but we count 22 SKUs spanning every client-segment brand extension by Intel. The lineup is led by the Core i9-10900K, a monolithic 10-core/20-thread processor featuring clock speeds of up to 5.30 GHz boost. Intel claims that the i9-10900K will be the fastest processor for gaming at launch. The Core i7-10700K is an 8-core/16-thread part clocked up to 5.10 GHz (4.70 GHz all-core), which should make it slower than the i9-9900KS, but matching the i9-9900K. The i5-10600K is a 6-core/12-thread clocked up to 4.80 GHz.
The pricing is particularly interesting. The new 10-core flagship Core i9-10900K launches at roughly the same price as the i9-9900K (launch price). The i7-10700K brings i9-9900K levels of performance at prices resembling those of the i7-9700K at launch (around $280). The i5-10600K brings i7-8700K levels of performance at prices similar to the i5-9600K. There are several SKUs detailed in the slides, the one that has our most attention is the i5-10400F (6-core/12-thread under $160). The prices in the slides could be for 1,000-unit tray quantities, retail prices could differ.
Source: HD Tecnologia
Add your own comment

32 Comments on Intel 10th Generation Core Desktop Series Presentation Leaked

#1
gamefoo21
Ugh...

Thinner package makes for a more fragile CPU.
Posted on Reply
#2
Caring1
Day early for this news?
Embargoed until April 30th 6am.
gamefoo21
Ugh...

Thinner package makes for a more fragile CPU.
Package is the same size.
Posted on Reply
#3
gamefoo21
Caring1
Day early for this news?
Embargoed until April 30th 6am.


Package is the same size.
Leaks?

You are right!

They are just removing material from the die.

Doh!
Posted on Reply
#4
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
gamefoo21
Ugh...

Thinner package makes for a more fragile CPU.
Underneath a thicker copper IHS.
Posted on Reply
#5
madness777
Really good news for delidders! The thinner die will make direct-die cooling a bit more efficient.
Will have to be extra careful not to put too much pressure on it tho!
Posted on Reply
#6
Xex360
Good news is AMD probably will lower their prices to undercut Intel.
Posted on Reply
#7
Logoffon
The only thing I like is the packaging on the first image, the rest, well, are what we'll expect.
Posted on Reply
#8
Melvis
Id like to see if this "new" STIM design they have will actually work, 4.9GHz all core clock on 10cores would run stupid hot! Id be surprised if the temps would be under 90c when running on normal cooling solutions.
Posted on Reply
#9
MrAMD
Per-core HT settings is interesting. Wonder how a mix of 5/5 on/off cores would fare for gaming and productivity workloads. Best of both worlds? Maybe 2/8 since most games use the first two cores as the main threads. Kinda wanna play around with it
Posted on Reply
#10
GoldenX
So, still no AVX-512.
Intel, this is no longer 2015.
Posted on Reply
#11
Vayra86
Intel 'Up To' Core.

What a joke



They could have just printed in fat bold 'No Guarantees' across this whole part. Well, I guess the core count is true.
Posted on Reply
#12
ARF
GoldenX
So, still no AVX-512.
Intel, this is no longer 2015.
I don't need AVX-512 and don't see why it should be taken seriously. AMD doesn't support it as well.
Posted on Reply
#13
R0H1T
You know it's not a leak when much of it is intentional & nearly regular as each passing day :shadedshu:
Posted on Reply
#14
ZoneDymo
is that thicker IHS needed? less material = better heat transfer right?
If the first was solid enough to take the pressure, then surely they could use that same height for the new one.
Posted on Reply
#15
ARF
ZoneDymo
is that thicker IHS needed? less material = better heat transfer right?
If the first was solid enough to take the pressure, then surely they could use that same height for the new one.
Well, with the silicon die maybe, but for cooling, larger heatsink is always better. The IHS plays the role of a heatsink, no?
Posted on Reply
#16
Tom Yum
ZoneDymo
is that thicker IHS needed? less material = better heat transfer right?
If the first was solid enough to take the pressure, then surely they could use that same height for the new one.
Thicker IHS will lead to better heat distribution across the bottom of the heatsink, improving heat transfer. Metal conducts heat better than silicon, so a thinner die and a thicker IHS overall supports better heat transfer.
Posted on Reply
#17
dj-electric
Out of the 240 media participants in that call, no idea how Intel did not expect this to leak within mare minutes.

lol.
Posted on Reply
#18
Aerpoweron
Just check how well silicon conducts heat compared to copper. Copper is over twice as efficient in transferring heat. So a thinner CPU-die is better, and the copper does not cause a big issue.

The 9900K was bad, because the heat was trapped inside the CPU-die and could not get out. Der 8auer stated to me peak heat transfer is around 240 to 260W for the 9900K. If you want more you need to delid and lap the cpu-die.

With the Z370 / 390 boards ignoring intel guidelines, pushing the cpu always to all core boost, you get a heat problem with heavy AVX2 load.
Posted on Reply
#19
watzupken
Intel's claim on fastest gaming CPU is likely true due to the clockspeed advantage, assuming one will have a good cooling, motherboard and power supply to go along with it. I can imagine every CPU in the Comet Lake series is going to run very hot. Even the base CPU have an up to 4.1Ghz all core turbo. With the rubbish cooler they have been giving for the non K series, I doubt it will be able to sustain this sort of boost.

The TDP as usual is still as misleading since the likes of the flagship is likely going to need at least 2.5 to 3x the TDP when boosting. I am starting to dislike this "boost" marketing a lot because I feel both Intel and AMD are starting to abuse this, with Intel being the main culprit. For example, if they are claiming XX TDP, then they should be comparing performance at the base clock, and not an "up to 5.3Ghz" comparison. In cases like gaming, I feel if the cooling is sufficient, the CPU will certainly run above the base clock, and thus, drawing more than the advertised TDP by quite a large margin considering the base clock is quite low.
Posted on Reply
#20
laszlo
after making jokes about amd "glued" cpu's i see now more often "overclocking" in their slides and advertising from them;there were against it not so long ago...desperate moves to get some attention
Posted on Reply
#21
jabbadap
Wonder how many different dies will there be. Highly doubt 2 core Celeron will have same die as 10 core i9. And yeah it's real shame that there's no unlocked i3 in the lineup.
Posted on Reply
#22
ARF
jabbadap
Wonder how many different dies will there be. Highly doubt 2 core Celeron will have same die as 10 core i9. And yeah it's real shame that there's no unlocked i3 in the lineup.
Good question. I thought that only the 10-core Core i9 needs a new die, and everything down the line could be just rebranded 9th generation.
These Celerons have very low efficiency - 2C/2T @3.4GHz in 58-watt?!
Posted on Reply
#23
Cranky5150
These things are gonna suck power like a vacuum on dirt. And we will see on their "pricing"..
Posted on Reply
#24
GoldenX
ARF
I don't need AVX-512 and don't see why it should be taken seriously. AMD doesn't support it as well.
You don't need HT either, or Turbo clock speed, or a free, useful heatsink with the CPU, or having the option of an upgrade path.
Why don't we return to x87 while we are at it? We don't need those many SSE versions.
Posted on Reply
#25
jabbadap
ARF
Good question. I thought that only the 10-core Core i9 needs a new die, and everything down the line could be just rebranded 9th generation.
These Celerons have very low efficiency - 2C/2T @3.4GHz in 58-watt?!
Plausible and most probable. That new velocity boost feature is only available on 10 core i9s, which kind of support your thoughts.
Posted on Reply
Add your own comment