Wednesday, May 27th 2020

ASUS APEs ASRock with a BFB-like Tech for non-K Intel Processors

ASUS with its Intel 400-series chipset motherboards is introducing APE, or ASUS Performance Enhancement, a feature rivaling ASRock Base Frequency Boost (BFB). What it essentially does is override PL1 (power level 1) for 65 W-rated on non-K Core processors, allowing the processor to sustain higher clock speeds after the Turbo Boost algorithm has exhausted Tau (a timing variable that allows the processor to stay within elevated boost states, before having to fall back to base frequency). Several of ASUS's Intel B460 chipset motherboards feature APE with maximum PL1 override values set at 125 W for most of the motherboard models listed in the slide below, except for the top ROG Strix B460-F Gaming, which allows you to dial the value all the way up to 210 W.

ASUS is introducing this feature through BIOS updates for boards that don't have it. The slide details the minimum BIOS version for each of the board that debuts APE. ASRock, on the other hand, introduced BFB for not just its entire Intel 400-series motherboard lineup, but also most of its Z390 and B365 lineups. To be fair to ASUS, this feature is more relevant to chipsets such as the B460, H470, and B365, since Z490 already features options that let you play with power limits. Intel gives motherboard vendors the freedom to set power limits and Tau value, but non-K processors would still be limited by their nameplate base- and boost frequencies, so raising PL1 beyond a point has no impact.
Source: BenchLife.info
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7 Comments on ASUS APEs ASRock with a BFB-like Tech for non-K Intel Processors

#1
cucker tarlson
needs to be tested.but 14nm +++++++++ silicon is probably tougher than a german tank at this point.
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#2
FreedomEclipse
~Technological Technocrat~
I think a certain demographic are gonna go apeshit.
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#3
cucker tarlson
FreedomEclipse
I think a certain demographic are gonna go apeshit.
huh?
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#4
kapone32
Knowing Asus there will probably be a premium for that feature on that class of board(s).
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#5
ppn
I want to be able to run 10400F on H410 cheap Mobo nonK GFXless at 4.00GHz 1.00V Prime95 AVX2 all day long.
But Im more interested in 10700/10900, must be able to maintain 4.6GHz no matter what workloads.
Im getting really frustrated with this uncertainty. It runs for 56 seconds and then it drops. For what? I pay for 4.60GHz. not 3.6 GHz
Well of course in games it sticks at 4.60 no question.
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#6
opteron
cucker tarlson
needs to be tested.but 14nm +++++++++ silicon is probably tougher than a german tank at this point.
+++++++++ is indeed the toughest tech around since 2000. still going strong >= 3+ years
Posted on Reply
#7
herasymcuk
I have an asrock z390 pro4 with an intel core i7-9700 NOT k ...
Leaving the bfb on Auto , or setting it to 125w, what I notice is that with a light load ... all 8 cores reach 4.7ghz simultaneously. While before it happened only (and rarely) on a single core (maximum two).
There is one thing that i don't understand: From the aida64 screens above .... the power limit 1 cpu is set to 125w by setting the bfb to 125: but this was possible even before, by changing directly the pl1 voltage .... What is the difference? I emphasize that before setting the pl1 to the maximum (well over 125w - 4000 if I'm not mistaken) it did not change the top speed, now yes.
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