Tuesday, December 1st 2020

TEAMGROUP is Taking the Global Lead in the New DDR5 Generation

As a world leader in computer memory, TEAMGROUP understands the importance of getting ahead in the next generation of DDR technology, hence it will be releasing ELITE series DDR5 memory in 2021. With over 20 years of experience developing DDR3 and DDR4 products, the company has dazzled the world with its advanced R&D capabilities and excellent product quality. After the JEDEC announced the DDR5 memory standard, TEAMGROUP has been actively designing and working together with our IC manufacturing partners to pioneer and prepare for this new generation.

TEAMGROUP is leading the way with its first DDR5 memory under its global top-selling ELITE memory product line. It plans to release a 16 GB 4800 MHz module operating at 1.1 V, down from the 1.2 V of the previous generation. The data transfer rate is increased to 4,800-5,200 Mbps, an increase of up to 1.6 times while reducing power consumption by 10%. Today's DDR4 memory with error correction code (ECC) requires an additional chip installed on the PCB, whereas DDR5 supports on-die ECC, a feature that self-corrects single-bit errors, greatly improving system stability. Anticipation is high for the efficiency improvements brought by the new generation, which can be utilized for big data and AI computing and other related applications.
TEAMGROUP has made ample preparations in 2020 to take the lead in the DDR5 market and will coordinate its releases with the DDR5 platforms of the top two CPU manufacturers, Intel and AMD. The company's DDR5 memory is expected to be available as early as Q3 2021. TEAMGROUP has always stood out as a global leader and will continue to do so as it brings more powerful and stable next-generation products to consumers worldwide.
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7 Comments on TEAMGROUP is Taking the Global Lead in the New DDR5 Generation

#1
Valantar
It's good to see even early DDR5 hitting speeds notably above common DDR4 speeds - while DDR3-2133 wasn't the most common, it was nonetheless common enough for initial DDR4 to be rather underwhelming. And of course we have DDR4 at and above this speed, but it's ridiculously expensive and exceedingly rare. Of course DDR5 promises to scale past 8000MT/s, so I'm looking forward to seeing things pick up in the future, but even this should be really good for AM5(?) APUs.
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#2
Gungar
ValantarIt's good to see even early DDR5 hitting speeds notably above common DDR4 speeds - while DDR3-2133 wasn't the most common, it was nonetheless common enough for initial DDR4 to be rather underwhelming. And of course we have DDR4 at and above this speed, but it's ridiculously expensive and exceedingly rare. Of course DDR5 promises to scale past 8000MT/s, so I'm looking forward to seeing things pick up in the future, but even this should be really good for AM5(?) APUs.
You have no idea how fast that 4800mhz DDR5 is because you don't have the latency, it could be as slow as ddr2 or faster than ddr4.
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#3
Valantar
GungarYou have no idea how fast that 4800mhz DDR5 is because you don't have the latency, it could be as slow as ddr2 or faster than ddr4.
DDR2 often had better latency than DDR4 (not just in cycles, but in ms too), so ...

But regardless of this, bandwidth is more important than latency for iGPU operations - GDDR already has far worse latencies than DDR, so GPUs don't care that much, and that is the most relevant memory limited scenario for consumers these days. As such, this will be an improvement regardless of the latencies of these chips. JEDEC latencies for DDR5-4800 are these:
Anandtech
  • DDR5-4800A: 34-34-34
  • DDR5-4800B: 40-40-40
  • DDR5-4800C: 42-42-42
Source. None of these latencies are even remotely impressive, but the focus for DDR5 is increasing bandwidth, so that's to be expected. Of course there will more than likely be much lower latency non-JEDEC spec offerings once the chips mature even a little, but there's little reason to think DDR5 will be any better than DDR4 in terms of latency.
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#4
Th3pwn3r
GungarYou have no idea how fast that 4800mhz DDR5 is because you don't have the latency, it could be as slow as ddr2 or faster than ddr4.
It could be as slow as DDR2 but it will not be.
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#5
Valantar
Th3pwn3rIt could be as slow as DDR2 but it will not be.
Apparently this needs repeating:
DDR2 is no slower than DDR4 in terms of latency.

DDR2-800 CL4 = 10ms latency
DDR2-1066 CL5 = 9.38ms latency
DDR4-3200 CL14 = 8.75ms latency
DDR4-3200 CL16 = 10ms latency

DDR2 was no slower than DDR4, only lower bandwidth.


For reference, the slowest DDR5-4800 class (C, 42-42-42) = 17.5ms latency, with A (34-34-34) at 14.17ms. In other words, DDR5 clearly prioritizes bandwidth over latency. To match DDR4-3200 C16 or DDR2-800 CL4 you'd need DDR5-4800 CL24.
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#6
Th3pwn3r
ValantarApparently this needs repeating:
DDR2 is no slower than DDR4 in terms of latency.

DDR2-800 CL4 = 10ms latency
DDR2-1066 CL5 = 9.38ms latency
DDR4-3200 CL14 = 8.75ms latency
DDR4-3200 CL16 = 10ms latency

DDR2 was no slower than DDR4, only lower bandwidth.


For reference, the slowest DDR5-4800 class (C, 42-42-42) = 17.5ms latency, with A (34-34-34) at 14.17ms. In other words, DDR5 clearly prioritizes bandwidth over latency. To match DDR4-3200 C16 or DDR2-800 CL4 you'd need DDR5-4800 CL24.
So what is bandwidth going to do for DDR5?
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#7
Valantar
Th3pwn3rSo what is bandwidth going to do for DDR5?
Unless they've changed something fundamental about DDR5, bandwidth should scale linearly with effective clock speed. So unless I've messed up the formula somehow (raw bandwidth * bus width / 8 / 1024 / 1024 / 1024, e.g. 3200000000*128/8/1024/1024/1024=47.68GB/s) the maximum theoretical bandwidth for a standard dual 64-bit channel desktop setup should be something like this:
DDR2-1066: 15.88GB/s
DDR3-1866: 27.8GB/s
DDR4-3200: 47.68GB/s
DDR5-4800: 71.53GB/s
DDR5-8000: 119.21GB/s
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