Tuesday, May 18th 2021

Noctua Confirms That its Passive Cooler is "Coming Very Soon"

Noctua first teased their passive CPU cooler at Computex 2019 which weighed 1.5 kg and could handle processors with a TDP of 120 W passively and 180 W with quiet fans. Noctua had been planning to release a commercial version of the cooler in Q1 2021 but that date was pushed to Q2 2021 when Noctua updated its product roadmap in early 2021. Noctua has recently confirmed that this latest launch date is on schedule with an announcement that the cooler is "coming very soon" in response to a user on Twitter. The prototype featured mounting for AM4 and LGA 115x sockets with it keeping the Intel i9-9900K cool under load so we expect it will handle any consumer CPU.
Source: @Noctua_at
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29 Comments on Noctua Confirms That its Passive Cooler is "Coming Very Soon"

#1
FreedomEclipse
~Technological Technocrat~
One thing i love about Noctua... "Coming soon" usually means anywhere between 3-5 years.
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#2
Mussels
Moderprator
why does the roadmap have a 24v to 12v voltage converter??
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#3
Xzibit
Might want to put the most recent roadmap they have on the site

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#4
Uskompuf
XzibitMight want to put the most recent roadmap they have on the site

Updated thanks
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#5
jesdals
UskompufUpdated thanks
I wonder if the new NH-D15 is code for AMD socket AM5 ? Could explain the need for such update
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#6
TheDeeGee
Personally looking forward to the new generation 140 fans.
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#7
Solid State Soul ( SSS )
Noctua might be the most self respecting company on the DIY pc market, they could have earned many times more profit if they did RGB fans and heatsinks as many have been begging them for, but they just dont care about trends and continue to make products that they want to make.

Mad respect.
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#8
King Mustard
Excellent. Hopefully, I can replace my liquid AIO, which has a pump and two fans that all add to the PC's acoustics.
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#9
Chrispy_
Full passive is pointless. Add a fan at 400rpm to quadruple the effectiveness of any passive heatsink, or better yet, reduce the size of the heatsink to something manageable. Even in a GPU-less case, your PSU needs some kind of cooling and there are components on the motherboard that require active airflow in the case anyway (VRMs, M.2 drives, PCH etc) so you HAVE to have at least one fan somewhere.

Your case is as noisy as your noisiest fan. Use motherboard fan control to ensure that no fan ever exceeds 600RPM and you'll struggle to hear it over the sound of your own breathing, or blood flowing through veins near your eardrums.

Certainly for any given budget you are better off using a vastly more compatible and compact cooler, and investing in a few high quality, low-noise fans that can run as low as 400RPM. I have an HTPC with a 3600XT, 2x NVME drives, B550 chipset and a 2060S with fan-stop. Unless the GPU is being used, the CPU fan runs at 500-600 rpm and the dust-filtered case fans run at 400. The only thing I can't really do with that thermal setup is use PBO but PBO is massively inefficient and rarely means more than 200MHz even if you give it free reign to guzzle infinite power. I'm okay with only getting 4.45GHz boost out of my 4.6GHz capable CPU. It's a very small price to pay for inaudible operation.
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#10
micropage7
the fins are pretty thick, i hope they not gonna upping it into 5000 grams
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#11
Voluman
Musselswhy does the roadmap have a 24v to 12v voltage converter??
Industrial fans
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#12
RealKGB
That 8-way fan hub...

Also I wonder what the 140mm fan will look like?
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#13
AsRock
TPU addict
shame it's orientation, but i guess it could work if air sucked in from the bottom and though the top, still waiting on a case that fully does that and have the PSU at the top so GPU can get better cooling.
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#14
MikeMurphy
Chrispy_Full passive is pointless. Add a fan at 400rpm to quadruple the effectiveness of any passive heatsink, or better yet, reduce the size of the heatsink to something manageable. Even in a GPU-less case, your PSU needs some kind of cooling and there are components on the motherboard that require active airflow in the case anyway (VRMs, M.2 drives, PCH etc) so you HAVE to have at least one fan somewhere.

Your case is as noisy as your noisiest fan. Use motherboard fan control to ensure that no fan ever exceeds 600RPM and you'll struggle to hear it over the sound of your own breathing, or blood flowing through veins near your eardrums.

Certainly for any given budget you are better off using a vastly more compatible and compact cooler, and investing in a few high quality, low-noise fans that can run as low as 400RPM. I have an HTPC with a 3600XT, 2x NVME drives, B550 chipset and a 2060S with fan-stop. Unless the GPU is being used, the CPU fan runs at 500-600 rpm and the dust-filtered case fans run at 400. The only thing I can't really do with that thermal setup is use PBO but PBO is massively inefficient and rarely means more than 200MHz even if you give it free reign to guzzle infinite power. I'm okay with only getting 4.45GHz boost out of my 4.6GHz capable CPU. It's a very small price to pay for inaudible operation.
There is a sizeable market for passive and not much competition, so I suspect they can make some money on this which is why they intend to do it.

Or, add fans to fully passive solutions like this for outstanding cooling performance.
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#15
80251
AsRockshame it's orientation, but i guess it could work if air sucked in from the bottom and though the top, still waiting on a case that fully does that and have the PSU at the top so GPU can get better cooling.
The PSU at the top? Retro!
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#16
AsRock
TPU addict
80251The PSU at the top? Retro!
It's better off at the top, it allows much better cooling for the GPU, it's not hard to put a PSU sideways in a case either.

In thought he bottom and out at the top.

That way people could have glass front cases too as air intake would be the bottom of the case.
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#17
Bork Bork
Too bad TEC never took off. I had a CM V10 for quite a while (Q9650 at the time) but it sure pulled a lot which was obviously its biggest flaw.
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#18
AsRock
TPU addict
Bork BorkToo bad TEC never took off. I had a CM V10 for quite a while (Q9650 at the time) but it sure pulled a lot which was obviously its biggest flaw.
Ewww, hell no.
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#19
80251
AsRockIt's better off at the top, it allows much better cooling for the GPU, it's not hard to put a PSU sideways in a case either.

In thought he bottom and out at the top.

That way people could have glass front cases too as air intake would be the bottom of the case.
I like that idea, but doesn't that mean the PSU would be getting a lot of hot, pre-heated intake air from the CPU and GPU?
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#20
AsRock
TPU addict
Not side ways as you would be getting air out of the side of the case, i get it why no one ? released a case with the 120\140mm fan pointing upwards as you have accidents and those who put plants on pc's haha, but side ways solves that.
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#21
80251
AsRockNot side ways as you would be getting air out of the side of the case, i get it why no one ? released a case with the 120\140mm fan pointing upwards as you have accidents and those who put plants on pc's haha, but side ways solves that.
I still have case with a PSU in the top, but it exhausts out the back with the fan pointing into the case.
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#22
AsRock
TPU addict
me too but it's side ways :), one day i will get around making a side vent for the PSU and flip. All so the steel is pretty thick and goes though a lot of dremal disks.

But the heat at top of the case is not a issue, CPU temps are really good it's the GPU that cannot get enough air flow, and cannot be assed to take every thing out of the case to put 3 fans on the bottom of it.

Just would like as new case already as this ones way over 13 years now hahahhaha.
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#23
comtek
AKA Noctua BYO Fans Cooler
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#24
watzupken
King MustardExcellent. Hopefully, I can replace my liquid AIO, which has a pump and two fans that all add to the PC's acoustics.
There's pros and cons with each type of solution. While AIO water cooler requires fans to cool the radiator, the heat gets expelled out of the casing pretty quickly if the fans are exhausting the air out. In addition, it generally don't cause obstructions on the motherboard.

For a passive cooler like this, you will need good airflow in the case as well otherwise heat will build up in the case. So you may lose some fans by going with a passive cooler, you may need extra fans on the case to pull in cooler air and quickly expel warm air in the case. In addition, I feel other downsides to this is going to be the size and weight. The size is going to cause a lot of issues trying to get to certain parts on the motherboard based on my personal experiences with huge air coolers. While nothing is mentioned about the weight, but I think it may put some stress on the motherboard, especially those with lesser PCB layers.
Solid State Soul ( SSS )Noctua might be the most self respecting company on the DIY pc market, they could have earned many times more profit if they did RGB fans and heatsinks as many have been begging them for, but they just dont care about trends and continue to make products that they want to make.

Mad respect.
There is still a sizable market for non RGB products. Most manufacturers out there are just following the herd. So why fight a battle with so many players in it? I rather Noctua focus on what they are good at and I am pretty sure they still make a lot of money out of it because they are a reputable brand when it comes to cooling solution.
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#25
Nordic
MikeMurphyOr, add fans to fully passive solutions like this for outstanding cooling performance.
Noctua says themselves that you can find better cooling with their other products designed for high airflow. This passive cooler has far less surface area and consequently less cooling. It excels in its lack of sound rather than performance.
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